Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 7, September

ABM Treaty Remains Threatened by Continuing U.S. Push for TMD
THE ONGOING debate over the future of missile defenses took a serious turn for the worse this summer as ABM Treaty discussions with Russia reached a stalemate and as the Republican-led Congress took up the defense authorization bills for fiscal year...
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Brigadier General Gregory G. Govan: An In-Depth Look at On-Site Inspections
On July 28, Brigadier General Gregory G. Govan retired after 31 years in the U.S. Army, most recently as director of the On-Site Inspection Agency (OSIA), the Pentagon's joint-service organization responsible for treaty-related monitoring and inspection...
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Cold Warriors Target Arms Control
While disagreements over the conflict in Bosnia have strained U.S. relations with Western Europe and Russia, these divisions will pale in comparison to the tensions that will arise if recent congressional arms control decisions become law. If the Republicans...
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Compromise Meriting a Veto
Pursuing its "Contract with America," the Republican-dominated Congress is seeking to force the Clinton administration to deploy a nationwide ballistic missile defense, in flagrant violation of the ABM Treaty. With practically no public debate, the Senate...
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France Replaces U.S. as Top Weapons Exporter in 1994
IN 1994 FRANCE for the first time replaced the United States as the world's top exporter of conventional weapons to developing countries, according to an annual Congressional Research Service (CRS) survey of global arms sales released in August. The...
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Gore-Chernomyrdin Talks Resolve Several Outstanding Issues
DURING THE fifth meeting of the Gore-Chemomyrdin Commission in Moscow June 29-30, the United States and Russia concluded several new understandings on defense, security, space and energy issues, including follow-on agreements to ensure the shutdown of...
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Iraq Provides IAEA with Significant New Information
UN WEAPONS inspectors in Iraq, benefiting from the recent defection of the Iraqi government minister who once directed his country's weapons of mass destruction programs, were told in August that Iraqi officials initiated a "crash program" in August...
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JASON Nuclear Testing Study
On August 4, the Energy Department released the summary and conclusions of a major classified study on the U.S. nuclear testing program, prepared by the JASON Committee, an independent group of senior non-governmental scientists that has advised the...
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KEDO Takes First Steps to Fulfill Nuclear Accord with North Korea
THE UNITED STATES and its Asian allies made encouraging progress during August implementing the denuclearization agreement with North Korea, expanding the multilateral effort to construct two proliferation-resistant nuclear reactors in the North and...
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Moscow's START II Ratification: Problems and Prospects
Long held hostage due to delays in START I's entry into the force, the START II agreement, signed in January 1993, is now high on the legislative agenda for ratification in Moscow and Washington. But despite the treaty's historic strategic importance,...
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New Senate Legislation Threatens ACDA's Survival
LEGISLATION THAT would abolish the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) and transfer its activities and personnel to the State Department has moved through the House of Representatives but has stalled in the Senate, provoking Senate Foreign Relations...
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Reassessing the Potential for Nuclear Proliferation -- Bridled Ambition: Why Countries Constrain Their Nuclear Capabilities by Mitchell Reiss
Mitchell Reiss, Bridled Ambition: Why Countries Constrain Their Nuclear Capabilities, Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 1995, 346 pp. Paper: $16.95.It is rare to find a specialist concerned with a policy goal whose commitment does not prejudice...
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Russia Ready to Join New Post-COCOM Organization
HAVING APPARENTLY settled its differences with the United States over its arms sales to Iran, Russia is set to join the "New Forum," the successor regime to the Coordinating Committee for Multilateral Export Controls (COCOM)--the now defunct export control...
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The CCW Review Conference: An Opportunity for U.S. Leadership
Every 22 minutes, someone in the world is maimed or killed by a land-mine. That is 26,000 people each year, most of them innocent civilians, according to the latest estimate by the State Department.When delegates to the Convention on Conventional Weapons...
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United States and EURATOM Strike New 35-Year Nuclear Accord
THE EUROPEAN Union (EU) on August ratified a major commercial accord between the United States and the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) that will govern trade in nuclear fuel and technologies for the next 35 years.The agreement, a follow-on...
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U.S. Policy Decision on Testing Seen as Helping CTB Talks
AFTER MONTHS of internal debate, President Bill Clinton announced August 11 that the United States would seek a strict I "zero-yield" definition for the comprehensive test ban (CTB) treaty under negotiation at the Geneva Conference on Disarmament (CD)....
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