East European Quarterly

A scholarly journal publishes articles in the disciplines of East European history, including its economics, politics, culture and history.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, Summer

Kosovo: A Case of Ethnic Change of Population(*)
The question which tribes inhabited the central part of the Balkan peninsula at the time of the arrival of the Slav tribes seems to be of limited importance today. Over several hundred years towards the middle of the first millennium Europe was the...
Nationalism and the Bosnian Muslims
INTRODUCTION The Bosnian Muslims were recognized by the socialist regime of Yugoslavia as "Muslims in the national sense" in 1968. Even though it marked a turning point in the approach to the nationality question of the Bosnian Muslims, who were...
Representational Mechanisms and Ethnopolitics: Evidence from Transitional Democracies in Eastern Europe
The history of the modern era has been littered with examples of failed democratic experiments. In ethnically divided societies, the introduction of democratic competition and expanded political participation has often led to disintegrative ethnic...
The Politics of Autocracy: Serbia under Slobodan Milosevic
INTRODUCTION The upheavals throughout Eastern Europe in 1989/91 were a truly remarkable phenomenon in modern human history. The world is still struggling to understand both the domestic and international significance of these events, as well as...
The War against Bosnia-Herzegovina
The war in Bosnia-Herzegovina may be explained as part of a wider process which also included the collapse of Yugoslavia. To this day there has been no comprehensive model offered to interpret this process. Furthermore, what we see promoted and adopted...
Yugoslavia's Internal Borders as International Borders: A Question of Appropriateness
The break-up of Yugoslavia during the early 1990s following the secessions of the republics of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Hercegovina and Macedonia, resulted in these four republics being recognized as independent states within the international community...
Yugoslav Wars: The "Revenge of the Countryside" between Sociological Reality and Nationalist Myth
THE YUGOSLAV WARS AS A "REVENGE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE" Numerous journalists and intellectuals have, with good reason, rejected the Hobbesian presentation of the Yugoslav wars--the idea of a "war of everyone against everyone"--as a mere reflection of...