Editor & Publisher

Articles from Vol. 127, No. 33, August 13

Ad Attack: Cuban Group Buys Full-Page Miami Herald Ad Zapping the Paper and Publisher David Lawrence
OVER THE YEARS, Jorge Mas Canosa's Cuban American National Foundation has used bumper stickers, bus posters and billboards to blast the Miami Herald and publisher David Lawrence Jr. Last week, however, the fervently anti-Castro group used the Herald...
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American Color Executive Joins Potential Competitor
TIM ROSENTHAL HAS resigned as syndicate coordinator at American Color to become production manager at Koessler Graphics, a new printing and prepress company which reportedly plans to compete with AC in the Sunday comics arena. AC handles, among...
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Ban the Naming of Rape Victims?
"DON'T USE MY name!" She was an old friend. I simply mentioned that I was finishing an article describing her experience with sexual violence. I told her once before that I wouldn't identify her, but she reiterated the above-mentioned plea. ...
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Collier-Jackson Sold to Canadian Firm
COLLIER-JACKSON INC., the supplier of newspaper business systems founded by Charles Jackson in 1975 and sold 12 years later to CompuServe Inc., was bought for cash last month by Geac Computer Corp. Ltd., Markham, Ontario. No price was disclosed...
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Diversity's Delineations: To Management, Diversity Means Numbers and Payback; to Minority Journalists, It Means Newsroom Transformation
UNITY '94, THE first-ever joint convention of African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American and Native American journalists, had, in effect, two opening ceremonies. The first, held on the evening of July 28, was a familiar set piece of the newspaper...
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Drop Indian Sports Terms, Minorities Say
ALL NEWSPAPERS SHOULD follow the lead of the Portland Oregonian and stop printing American Indian sports team nicknames, the Unity '94 convention of minority journalists declared in Atlanta. The resolution, proposed by the Native American journalists...
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Ethical Principals
THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE of the Associated Presss Managing Editors has wisely backed off from the hazardous reef it was sailing into with an overly detailed code of ethics and is now proposing a much shorter and simpler Statement of Ethical Principles...
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FreeHand to Revert to Altsys
ALTSYS CORP., RICHARDSON, Texas, said it settled its lawsuit against Seattle-based Aldus Corp. with an amended license for Aldus to continue marketing its Freehand illustration and design software. While the parties involved reached agreement on...
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Inter Press Cuts Support for N. American Outlet
FINANCIAL PROBLEMS AT Inter Press Service are threatening the future of its Global Information Network distribution wing. The difficulty bodes ill for GIN'S subscribers: 28 English-language and 15 Spanish-language publications or broadcasting outlets,...
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Jersey Press Group Hits Hard in Bid for Political Ads
WHEN IT COMES to getting those hard-to,come-by political advertising dollars, the New Jersey Press Association no longer is going to be Mr. or Ms. Nice Guy. The association, which represents 20 daily and about a dozen weekly newspapers in the Garden...
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N.Y. Daily News 'Wins' Thumbs Down, Again
FOR THE SECOND year in a row, the National Association of Black Journalists singled out the New York Daily News for its Thumbs Down Award. Last year, the Daily News was cited because it fired all its black male reporters during a downsizing and...
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Pulitzer Winner Commits Suicide
FREE-LANCE PHOTOGRAPHER Kevin Carter, who won the Pulitzer Prize this year for his picture of a vulture trailing a starving Sudanese girl, was found dead July 26 near Johannesburg, South Africa, in an apparent suicide. Police found Carter's body...
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Scarborough Apologizes for Newspaper Survey Done for TV Network
SCARBOROUGH RESEARCH CORP. has apologized to its newspaper clients after recently conducting a readership study of newspaper sections in five markets on behalf of a television network and its affiliate stations. "Scarborough had pursued a policy...
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Syndicates Criticize Comics Survey Firm
IN 1984, UNITED Media executive David Hendin asked Media Research Associates to no longer list United's two syndicates as clients of MRA's annual comics survey. "We purchased your service one time a number of years ago, and do not wish to purchase...
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There's No Censorship Quite like Murder; Foreign Born, They Died Violently in the USA as Journalists
AMONG THE IMMIGRANT journalists killed on U.S. soil and featured in a report from the Committee to Protect journalists, eight are believed to be victims of political assassinations. Between 1981 and 1990, five Vietnamese-American journalists were...
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Times a Changing at Third World Agency; Cold War's End Signals Shift of Focus for Inter Press Service
INTER PRESS SERVICE, which for almost three decades has prided itself on being a Third World news agency, is becoming more of a supplemental service for mainstream media in what managing director Roberto Savio called "a transition process from the...
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Trouble under the Big Tent: Resentment Arises When Gay White Men Wear Mantle of 'Oppressed.'
UNITY '94 WAS the Woodstock of multiculturalism, an often moving and always invigorating demonstration of how American journalism is changing and growing. But all was not sweetness and light at the Atlanta conference. For at this first-ever meeting...
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United for the Cause of Newsroom Diversity
For America's journalists of color, Unity '94 was a triumph of organizational genius, compassion and self-confidence. It was a grand celebration of ethnic diversity in the large newsrooms of print journalism and, to a slightly less degree, in the...
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Unusual Alliances Bring Ad Dollars to Newspapers
FACED WITH GROWING real estate ad competition, newspapers are taking a cue from their competitors and forming nontraditional alliances that offer advertisers a variety of marketing platforms. Six months ago, Phoenix Newspapers Inc., which operates...
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Where's the Outrage? CPJ Report Calls Murder of Immigrant Journalists Terrorism, but U.S. Law Enforcement and Press Remain Indifferent
TERRORIST ACTS HAVE been committed on U.S. soil but have gone unsolved and have received scant media attention, a new report says. Between 1981 and 1993, 10 foreign-language journalists working in the United States were murdered, eight of them in...
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