Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 5, January

Alfred Jensen: Dia Center for the Arts, New York
Location, location, location: That was my mantra as I stumbled out of Dia's galleries and down those breakneck steps. No, I wasn't thinking about Chelsea real estate but about the Alfred Jensen problem. Where do we put him? Where does he put us? ...
"Arbeit Essen Angst": Kokerei Zollverein. (Essen)
More and more, art addresses the human and economic conditions of society. Since the G8 summit in Genoa, there have been efforts to formulate a viable basis for critiquing globalization in cultural as well as economic terms. This trend remains unchanged...
Back at You: Cady Noland
"THEY ARE CONFRONTATIONAL, TOUGH," says Cady Noland about the artists she brings together here. "WHUT CHOO LOOKIN AT, MOFO?" asks Adrian Piper's alter ego in Self Portrait as a Nice White Lady, 1995. It's a question of who's welcome, who's allowed...
Bruno Fazzolari: Gallery Paule Anglim. (San Francisco)
A strangely white-brown (sun-aged?) desk, one short leg a browned end of an unpeeled banana, hides the smiling arc of a golden banana, its ends somehow melded to the underside of the tabletop. As Banna, 2001, demonstrates, Bruno Fazzolari is making...
Call to Order
IN ANTICIPATION OF THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART'S FEBRUARY RETROSPECTIVE "GERHARD RICHTER: 40 YEARS OF PAINTING," TOM HOLERT TALKS WITH ROBERT STORR IN THE CURATOR'S MOMA OFFICE. The well-mannered monstre sacre of postwar German art learned his profession...
Carla Arocha: Monique Meloche. (Chicago)
The threat of terrorism and the fear that follows a terrorist attack reduce "normalcy" to a veneer of routine that only imperfectly masks our vulnerabilities and anxieties. On March 20, 1995, several teams of Aum Shinrikyo sect members released aqueous...
Carlo Valsecchi: Studio Casoli. (Milan)
When people leave the places where they live and work, it sometimes seems that those urban and industrial landscapes, no longer "disturbed" by human presence, finally begin to lead a secret life, their true life, invisible to the human eye. This is...
Celeste Boursier-Mougenot: Paula Cooper Gallery. (New York)
Though it's been years now since Chelsea became the new SoHo, the area still seems to exist at the edge of the action. There are more places to eat and drink, but thankfully it hasn't yet acquired the outdoor-mall atmosphere of its cousin to the south....
Chris Finley: ACME. (Los Angeles)
To be honest, I've always found Chris Finley's work hit-or-miss at best. His early- to mid-'90s bricolages of chopped and tailored Tupperware containers, pencils, and other dime-store miscellany seemed to succeed mostly when they failed to deliver...
Daniel Senise: Galeria Brito Cimino. (Sao Paulo)
It's tough to be a painter these days, let alone one who has reached midcareer having emerged and won acclaim in the days when painting was the privileged medium--the '80s. Now, with the emphasis on video, photography, and interactive work, more than...
Dan Peterman: Kunstverein Hannover/Helga Maria Klosterfelde. (Hannover/Hamburg)
Dan Peterman's work comes from a brick building in Chicago ("the Building"), whose precincts housed a self-managed recycling yard, a bicycle repair shop, the publishers of a journal (The Baffler), a community service organization, and guest studios,...
David Byrne. (Top Ten)
David Byrne is a musician, producer of music and films, and photographer. His images appeared most recently in a fall 2001 solo show at the Maryland Institute College of Art's Decker Gallery. 1 ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA This guy...
David Musgrave: Greengrassi. (London)
A quality of restrained, forceful inquisitiveness pervaded the small but intense group of pieces that made up David Musgrave's latest exhibition (all works 2001). Within their playful diversity, the works seemed to test the boundaries of the human...
Dike Blair: Feature Inc. (New York)
Dike Blair has always been a careful observer of scenes. His paintings of hotel lobbies, full ashtrays, car interiors, and glistening glasses of champagne amount to a compendium of luxury-class still life. His installations tend to capture less rarefied...
Early Decision: Adam Lehner on Kirk Varnedoe. (News)
AT FIRST THE NEWS OF KIRK VARNEDOE's departure from the Museum of Modern Art was a source of bafflement to much of the art world. The chief curator of painting and sculpture announced in October that he would be leaving his post in January to join...
Eva Hesse: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Eva Hesse, with her lumpy, handmade sculpture, her bumpy, dramatic personal life, and her premature death at the age of thirty-four, has long been something of a heroine in college art departments, not unlike Frida Kahlo or Sylvia Plath. With a mere...
First Take First Take First
What's new in the new year? For the second season running we called on a dozen critics and curators we find dependably prescient when it comes to identifying new ideas and new art and asked them to introduce the work of a young artist they feel shows...
Hannah Villiger: Kunsthalle Basel. (Basel)
Just four years after Hannah Villiger's death at the age of forty-six, the Kunsthalle Basel dedicated an exhibition of considerable scope to the Swiss artist, accompanied by a detailed monograph, including a catalogue raisonne of her works. Nevertheless,...
Haus Beautiful: Jeff Weinstein on the Neue Galerie. (Preview)
Countries come in and out of fashion, and this seems to be primetime, in New York at least, for Austria. David Bouley's Danube, with neo-Viennese food on the menu and faux Klimts on the walls, is doing bang-up business. And now there is Cafe Sabarsky,...
Heike Baranowsky: Kunst-Werke. (Berlin)
What's wrong with this picture? The German artist Heike Baranowsky would be happy to explain the strange things going on in her videos. But the explanations--which amount to digital manipulation and changes in camera perspective-- don't seem to help....
Helen Altman: Dunn and Brown Contemporary. (Dallas)
Helen Altman's recent show "My Best Eggs" included fifteen "torch" drawings of animals ranging from pandas and lions to sad-sack dogs and mules. Her technique, developed several years ago, involves scorching marks into water-soaked paper with a propane...
Home in the World: The Art of Do-Ho Suh
A voluminous canopy in translucent celadon silk is suspended from the gallery ceiling like a dream or a ghost of a house. Responsive to light and air currents and open at the bottom as if it could drift down to enclose a viewer standing below, the...
Ian Wallace: P.H.A.G., Inc. (New York)
Well-known in Vancouver as a founder of photoconceptualism, Ian Wallace has had a profound influence on such artists as Jeff Wall and Ken burn, yet he does not share their high profile internationally: This was his first New York show since 1992. Of...
"Into the Light: Image in American Art 1964-1977"; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
After the September II attack on the World Trade Center, some psychologists discovered that young children watching the endlessly repeated footage of the second collision on TV believed that each replay of the crash represented a new event. The fact...
James Siena: Gorney Bravin and Lee. (New York)
James Siena's small enamel paintings on aluminum are always absorbing, his drawings on paper no less so. Like Op art, they tend to confuse the eye as it tries to untangle their intricate webs of line and color. Some are quite regular and geometric:...
Janet Cardiff: P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, New York
Works of visual art that rely on sound, site-specific projects that induce an overwhelming sense of physical dislocation, Janet Cardiff's audio walks chart a terrain that can only be described as interstitial. Visitors to her midcareer survey who pick...
January 1992. (10*20*30)
Ten years ago this month, Michael Corris introduced Damien Hirst to Artforum's readers in the seventh installment of "Openings," a recurring feature launched the previous year. Senior editor ERIC C. BANKS looks back at Hirst's legacy--and that of the...
Jess Von der Ahe: Jay Grimm Gallery. (New York)
Perhaps it's a mark of my own post-feminism (or just squeamishness) that I assumed the blood in von der Ahe's work was drawn from her arm. Taking the politics out of menstrual blood is certainly one of the artist's accomplishments: Rather than provocation...
Jim Waters: Kiang Gallery. (Atlanta)
Jim Waters paints in series: Each group of works on shaped panels explores a single form, such as a star burst. In this case, all the panels are shaped like the letter O, in many colors and sizes but always in the same font (narrower on the top and...
Katharina Fritsch: Tate Modern, London
To begin, a niggly question: When painting or sculpture is labeled "uncanny," what is actually being claimed? Katharina Fritsch's image world--of effigies and doubles, skulls and spooks, votive figures and volkisch motifs--has fixed her work in this...
Keith Sonnier: Location One. (New York)
Keith Sonnier gained recognition in the early '70s for work that engaged the "new" medium of light. Along with Dan Flavin, Robert Irwin, and James Turrell, Sonnier experimented with neon and argon to create sculpture and installations that treated...
Knut Asdam: Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert, Inc. (New York)
Knut Asdam deals with boundaries, both physical and metaphoric. By problematizing such apparently clear-cut categories as subject/object, internal/external, and private/public, Asdam shows how slippery binary oppositions can be. The results are often...
Laura Owens: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. (Boston)
The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, where Laura Owens spent a month in residence in the spring of 2000, provided the ideal site for the Los Angeles-based artist's first solo museum show: Owens's clever and oddball mixing of styles and vocabularies...
Leaving Los Angeles: Louisa Buck on Mike Figgis's Battle of Orgreave. (Film)
JUNE 17, 2001. In a muddy field in the north of England near a giant slag heap, British film director Mike Figgis is engulfed in a crowd of picketers who are slugging it out with massed ranks of bobbies in full riot gear. As the protesters hurl themselves...
Mark Bradford: Lombard-Freid Fine Arts. (Reviews)
Mark Bradford, an artist who works as a hairstylist in South-Central Los Angeles, displays a deceptively austere sensibility in the modular veils of subtly graded hues that ripple over the surfaces of his latest paintings. But the purity of the abstract...
Muntean/Rosenblum: Galerie Georg Kargl. (Vienna)
There's a prefab housing development just outside the gates of Vienna called the Blue Lagoon--an idyll of single-family homes erected between a shopping mall and the Autobahn. "Experience your dream life," promises the brochure. This artificial suburbia...
Otto Freundlich: Michael Werner. (New York)
It's hard to find stranger, more uncanny sculptures in early avant-garde art than Otto Freundlich's. That may be why he is omitted from such major compendiums of modem art as those by H. Harvard Arnason and Sam Hunter, and even from the purportedly...
Paris De Deux: Jennifer Allen on Palais De Tokyo and le Plateau. (Preview)
Enfin. On January 19, the long-anticipated Palais de Tokyo opens its doors as the world's first art center to welcome visitors "from midday to midnight." Located in the building adjacent to the Musee d'Art Moderne de la Vile de Paris, the Palais is...
Perino & Vele: Alfonso Artiaco. (Naples)
Unlike their typical repertoire of embroidered objects made from simple materials such as papier-mache or rusted iron, Perino & Vele's latest work, Closed for this week, 2001, was an installation that transformed the surrounding space. Two rolling...
Philippe Ramette: Galerie Xippas. (Parris)
The world upside down: The artist is standing in a suit and tie; he has climbed onto a pulpit, and his hands grip a wooden balcony that is floating on the water. Behind him the Bay of Hong Kong extends as far as the eye can see, but is turned at a...
Preview International Shorts
SPONTANEITY SURE AIN'T WHAT IT used to be. Nowadays acting off the cuff takes detailed preplanning: Just ask Nouveau Realiste Daniel Spoerri, who reprises his Eat Art Concept at the Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume, Paris, from April 19 to May 19....
Preview U.S. Shorts
WILL AMERICANS TURN TO ART AS an escape from trying times, or will we just keep going to the mall? Luckily for those of us who are feeling the squeeze, there'll be plenty of thrills beyond the Cineplex and Victoria's Secret this spring. Visitors to...
Rebeca Bollinger: Rena Bransten Gallery. (San Francisco)
Off-the-shelf electronic devices always seem to have a feature that some engineer gleefully cooked up but few actual users ever figure out quite what to do with. Take the "tile" function on most digital cameras--the button that multiplies an image...
Robert Breer &: GB Agency. (Paris)
A "retouched self-portrait" published in 1962 presents Robert Breer--an American artist born in Detroit in 1926--with his face half-photographed and half-drawn, as though he were being absorbed little by little into his work; he sits at a table in...
Roni Horn: Dia Center for the Arts. (New York)
When an artist settles into the niche of her obsessions, the line can become very fine between the rote re-presentation of a signature discovery and the passionate revision of a central but enigmatic urge. Twenty-some years into her career, Roni Horn's...
Roy Lichtenstein: Mitchell - Innes and Nash. (New York)
The hard thing about Roy Lichtenstein's paintings of brushstrokes isn't getting the joke (they are often extremely funny) but thinking of them as paintings. The forty-eight drawings, sculptures, and paintings in this show of work from the late '50s...
Sarah Dobai: Entwistle. (London)
In Sarah Dobai's photograph Above the City (all works 2001), London stretches out toward a low horizon. Even the structures that puncture the skyline--Centre Point, the London Eye Millennium Wheel, and a tower block in the foreground-- reach only tentatively...
Small Wonder: Frances Richard on Rochelle Steiner. (Preview)
Set like a jewel in London's Kensington Gardens, the Serpentine Gallery is "probably the greatest art space in the world for its size," according to Ralph Rugoff, director of the CCAC Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts (his show "The Greenhouse...
States of Grace: Barbara Novak on "American Sublime". (the Vault Preview)
IN 1829 THOMAS COLE COMPLAINED THAT HIS paintings were skied in the hanging at the Royal Academy and British Gallery in London. "On the varnishing day," he wrote, "I found them in the most exalted situations." Soon his most extraordinary work, the...
Sunday Jack Akpan: Contemporanea Arti E Culture. (Milan)
Sunday Jack Akpan's business card bears the following words: "Undertakes Construction of Images, Statues, Tombstones of all kinds, Pottery Products, Marble Tombstones, Decoration of House Furniture, Drawing and General Arts." This first exhibition...
Tribal Counsel: Nico Israel on the Whitney Biennial. (Preview)
"SO YOU GOT THE LIST?" ASKS LAWRENCE RINDER, chief curator of the Whitney Museum's 2002 Biennial, as we settle into his office. I tell him it was faxed to me that morning. "Let me see if you got the right list," he says, perusing it carefully. "The...
Willem De Kooning: Matthew Marks Gallery. (Reviews)
Like an unsigned will, Willem de Kooning's 1980s paintings ended his career with a kind of divisive largesse. For some viewers, the aged de Kooning is a kind of Yeatsian hero, sailing off into his own Byzantium. To detractors, he's a pitiable mannequin,...