Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 6, February

A Thousand Words
I started working in the art world largely because of my experience with the film industry. In film, waiting for funding can be very frustrating, so while I was sitting around with my video camera waiting for the money for my second, and last, feature--a...
Ben Whitehouse: Belloc Lowndes Fine Art. (Reviews: Chicago)
Plein-air painting, once a central genre of modern art, has experienced such a precipitous decline in recent decades as to have practically disappeared. In what often seems an openhanded acknowledgment of the accomplishments of his art-historical predecessors,...
Bernar Venet: Robert Miller. (Reviews: New York)
In 1973, Bernar Venet wrote an essay in which he disclaimed any connection with "Duchampian style or Nouveau Realisme" and instead connected his art to the theory of French semiologist Jacques Bertin, which grouped signs into three categories. The...
Burning Bright. (Music)
FAMILIAR WITH HERM CHOREOGRAPH? Well, if you've ever attended a Le Tigre concert, choreographed by band member JD Samson, you've seen it. Herm (slang for androgynous queer) locates Samson and the boy-band-derivative moves one sees at Le Tigre shows--her...
Castello Di Rivoli, Turin. (Reviews)
"Trans-Avanguardia" As it was with arte povera, so it goes with the Transavanguardia. Some two decades after Achille Bonito Oliva coined the term (in a 1979 article in Flash Art), it now resurfaces on the occasion of an exhibition reuniting the...
Caves of New York
On the heels of his sprawling Bataille Monument, realized for Documenta 11, Thomas Hirschhorn made his Manhattan allery debut last fall with Cavemanman. Michael Wilson paid a visit to the site as the Swiss artist's moden-day cardboard-and-packing-tape...
David Hammons: Ace Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
By all accounts, the opening for David Hammons's Concerto in Black and Blue, 2002, was magical. Rather than put objects on display or represent the depth of his artistic practice--which ranges from film and video to performance to works on paper--Hammons...
Dia Center for the Arts, New York. (Reviews)
Jo Baer Viewed in reproduction, the early paintings of Jo Baer can make a misleading first impression. They might appear impassive, even "noncommittal," to repeat a term used by John Ashbery when he reviewed Baer's first solo show in 1966. Seen...
Erwin Redl: Riva Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
Erwin Redl is a sculptor whose primary material is the light-emitting diode (or LED), deployed at a dominating and theatrical scale. He is best known in New York for having sheathed the Whitney Museum in red and blue curtains of light for the 2002...
"Etnografia: Modo De Empleo"; Museo De Bellas Artes. (Reviews: Caracas)
According to the brochure for the exhibition, the intention of "Etnografia: Modo de Empleo--Arqueologia, Bellas Artes, Etnografia y Variedades" (Ethnography: a user's guide--archaeology, fine arts, ethnography and varieties) was to "examine the distinct...
February 1973
THIRTY YEARS AGO THIS MONTH, Artforum published a five-page feature on the career of Sam Francis on the occasion of the artist's retrospective at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, in Buffalo. Marked by the rather harsh judgment of its author ("Francis...
Fondation Cartier Pour L'Art Contemporain, Paris. (Reviews)
The gnawing question raised by "Ce qui arrive..." (What happens ... , officially translated as "Unknown Quantity"), the exhibition at the Fondation Cartier conceived by technology theorist Paul Virilio and cocurated by Leanne Sacramone, is how this...
Giuseppe Uncini: Galleria Gio Marconi/Galleria Christian Stein. (Reviews: Milan)
Around 1960, Pier Paolo Pasolini was describing the life of Rome's new urban periphery, with its big apartment blocks right up against age-old nature and inhabited by a lumpenproletariat that seemed to hold the memory of a certain classical grandeur...
Ines Lombardi: Georg Kargl Fine Arts. (Reviews: Vienna)
A journey from Rotterdam across Europe to the delta of the Danube: The tanker ship moved lethargically down the Rhine, Main, and Danube, from the Dutch and German industrial regions to the picturesque vineyards of Wachau and through the Iron Gate,...
Jason Meadows: Marc Foxx. (Reviews: Los Angeles)
The announcement card to Jason Meadows's show, "Animal Eyes" provided a starting point for considering his recent work. If the show's title is read phonetically (to become animalize), Meadows could be seen to animalize his earlier DIY geometric formalism,...
Jason Middlebrook. (Top Ten)
New York-based artist Jason Middlebrook's installation Empire of Dirt will be on view this spring at the Palazzo delle Papesse Centro Arte Contemporanea in Siena. 1 THE FUTURE OF LIFE (Knopf, 2002) Harvard-based sociobiologist Edward O. Wilson thrilled...
Jeff Koons: Sonnabend Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
Jeff Koons did not become the most famous artist to emerge from the milieu of '80s New York because of his paintings--but they have always been there. He produced works on canvas as early as 1986 in his "Luxury and Degradation" series, which appropriated...
Jennifer Bartlett: Artemis Greenberg Van Doren. (Reviews: New York)
Jennifer Bartlett established her reputation with her 1975-76 work Rhapsody. The painting consists of a grid of 987 square panels offering a compendium of artistic genres and motifs--geometric structuralism, representation, abstraction, the monochromatic,...
Jennifer Steinkamp: Acme. (Reviews: Los Angeles)
Jennifer Steinkamp's latest exhibition included three digital videos (all 2002). Mar Vista, a collaboration with composers Holly Lovecat and Jimmy Johnson, who provide a likable, techno-y score, is a small projected digital animation that takes a romantic...
Jonathan Podwil: Plane Space. (Reviews: New York)
The art historian Gertrud Koch once characterized Gerhard Richter's famously fuzzy-edged technique as the "Richter-scale of blur." I thought of this phrase when viewing Jonathan Podwil's recent exhibition of painting and film. The artist's still and...
Larry Poons. (First Break)
Barry Schwabsky looks back on the early days of Larry Poons's career, when a studio visit by artist Ray Johnson ultimately led to Poons's first one-man show, at the Green Gallery in 1963. BEFORE THERE WAS THE ART WORLD, there was bohemia. And you...
"Latente Utopien"/"Enactments of the Self": Landesmuseum Joanneum/Various Locations. (Reviews: Graz, Austria)
How I live equals who I am. So architectural issues are also questions of identity. And utopian thought, which is nothing other than the reflection that the way one lives and who one is might well be otherwise, demands new kinds of building to support...
Leandro Erlich: Galerie Gabrielle Maubrie. (Reviews: Paris)
The globe-trotters of the contemporary-art world remember it still: In June 2001, at the 49th Venice Biennale, Leandro Erlich, representing Argentina (that year exhibiting in the Central Post Office), invited people to participate in a strange experience--to...
Marina Abramovic: Sean Kelly Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
Marina Abramovic's The House with the Ocean View, 2002, may well be one of the most important live artworks of the decade, but not for obvious reasons. Not only because the artist produced an elegant work that continues themes from a thirty-year career...
Michael Ashkin: Andrea Rosen Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
"Drive Route 1 and 9 from Metuchen to the Holland Tunnel. Do this from South to North late in the afternoon on a sunny day to catch the full effect of the light on the multi-colored signs and roadside architecture. Make sure that...you stay on Truck...
Missing in Action: The Art of the Atlas Group/Walid Raad
Walid Raad is writing a history of contemporary events in Lebanon, a seemingly comprehensive essay using video, the Internet, performance, collage, and digital photography, not to mention prose in English, French, and Arabic. Given its scope and the...
New Again. (News)
At a time when long-established organizations such as the Guggenheim Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art have been forced to shelve expansion plans in line with austere budgets, the New Museum of Contemporary Art has announced plans to...
Openings: Aleksandra Mir
To get a sense of New York--based artist Aleksandra Mir's ongoing project HELLO, recall the final scene of Fellini's 8 1/2. The film's narrative unhinges in front of the camera, as all the characters walk onto an abandoned set and join hands in a long...
Pae White. (Hotlist)
Pae White is a Los Angelesubased artist whose work is often inspired by design. Her series ot stylized barbecues, created as part of the Minetta Brooku sponsored Watershed project, will go on view at three Hudson Valley locations in May. BELIEVE...
Pat Steir: Baldwin Gallery. (Reviews: Aspen)
One does not typically visit the exhibition of a veteran artist expecting to be surprised by some sweeping stylistic change, although that can happen. Instead, the appeal is in seeing the latest steps in the evolution of a body of work and in discerning...
Portfolio: Simryn Gill
"Standing Still" is a suite of 113 photographs made by the Singapore-born artist Simryn Gill in her travels across the Malaysian countryside over a period of two years ending last summer. Gill, who was educated in India and England and has lived and...
Rachel Feinstein: Corvi-Mora. (Reviews: London)
There's something slyly diabolical about Rachel Feinstein's imaginary universe. The American sculptor is fixated on the most hedonistic and decorative manifestations of eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century European court culture, whose visual codes...
Rainer Ganahl: Base. (Reviews: Florence)
One could describe Rainer Ganahl's work as a mutant strain of endurance-oriented performance art. 'Whereas most such work, created in the late '6os and '70S, centered around the body--getting shot or cut, squeezing into a confined space, living in...
Rip Hopkins: Galerie Baudoin Lebon. (Reviews: Paris)
For once, something has been gained in the translation--and there is a lot of translation going on in this remarkable series of images. To begin with, the title: What began in the mind of Sheffield-born, Paris-based photographer Rip Hopkins as "Tajikistan...
Robert Ryman: Pacewildenstein. (Reviews: New York)
In the catalogue accompanying Robert Ryman's show of recent paintings is a photograph of the artist's studio: pristine, with paints, brushes, palette knives, solvents, and tools resting on two small carts and a stool, his signature white paintings...
Rosemarie Trockel: Dia Center for the Arts. (Reviews: New York)
First encounters with Rosemarie Trockel have often left American viewers puzzled. The many narrative routes into her work, plus the specificity of her German-language references, can appear unfathomable. Yet this didn't prevent a favorable critical...
Rosie Lee Tompkins: Peter Blum. (Reviews: New York)
The decorative arts are noticed more widely now and then in fine-art circles, effectively deflating categorical hierarchies of media and genres--having been brought into the museum context to widen the scope of modernism so that it might be thought...
Rut Blees Luxemburg: Laurent Delaye Gallery. (Reviews: London)
Noises carried up from the street below through an open window that is usually closed, shuttered, and covered by a screen wall on which art is hung. But Rut Blees Luxemburg revealed it again as part of the installation of her show "Cauchemar," which...
Sanja Ivekovic: Neue Gesellschaft Fur Bildende Kunst. (Reviews: Berlin)
The biography of Croatian artist Sanja Ivekovic, who was born in 1949, is characterized by enormous leaps. The Balkan wars turned her work on feminist themes into a work of mourning: At Documenta II, one could see the installation Searching for my...
Sergei Bugaev: I-20 Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
Splash-painted in oil or tar onto a white gallery wall, the title of Sergei Bugaev's installation Stalker 3, 1996/2002, could be that of a low-budget slasher film, but it soon became clear that a different kind of terror was being evoked. The cinematic...
Silke Otto-Knapp: Galerie Karin Gunther. (Reviews: Hamburg)
The way catastrophes are reported in the news regularly prompts discussions on the formative influence media images have on our understanding of these events. Much less is said about how our notions about paradisiacal places, unspoiled wilderness,...
Size Matters: Big Is the Only Word for It. (News)
The big new space for big newish art that the Dia Art Foundation will open this May in Beacon, New York, should be a very big deal. Dia:Beacon's impeccably renovated industrial building, designed by Robert Irwin and OpenOffice architects, makes 240,000...
Superflex: Rooseum. (Reviews: Amsterdam)
"Every tool is a weapon if you hold it right." Superflex-the artists collective composed of Bjornstjerne Reuter Christiansen, Jakob Fenger, and Rasmus Nielsen-take the Ani DiPranco lyric as a truism but also as a call to arms. Like Empire authors Michael...
The Happy End of Kippenberger's Amerika
MARTIN KIPPENBERGER SPAWNED A WEALTH OF ART-WORLD legends in his truncated career. His practice seemed specifically designed to maintain a steady buildup of anecdotes, many of which continue to circulate today, six years after his death. On the occasion...
The Jewish Museum, New York. (Reviews)
Adolph Gottlieb There's supposed to be a moment of conversion in the careers of Abstract Expressionists. For Adolph Gottlieb, it comes in 1957, when he studies his "Imaginary Landscapes" and decides to get rid of everything except the orbs floating...
Tracey Emin: Stedelijk Museum. (Reviews: Amsterdam)
Only a handful of contemporary artists are household names. In England, at least, Tracey Emin tops the list. I began to understand why a few years ago when she walked into an opening and immediately this warm, happy feeling went through me: Ah, there's...
Webbed Wonder. (Film)
DAVID CRONENBERG'S SPIDER stars Ralph Fiennes as a mentally disturbed man whose web of defenses unravels when he's transferred from an asylum to a halfway house in the squalid East End London neighborhood where he lived as a child. The film--which...
Work in Process: Bernard Frize
THE INSTALLATIONS BY FISCHLI & WEISS no less than the performances by Paola Pivi and Eric Duyckaerts carry out, in slapstick mode, deliberate inquiries into process. From the Gutai group's spectacular gestures to Wim Delvoye's digesting machine,...
Yehudit Sasportas: Berkeley Art Museum. (Reviews: Berkeley)
The Carpenter and the Seamstress, 2000-2001, the first major work by Yehudit Sasportas to be seen outside her native Israel, was a room-scale installation (at Deitch Projects in New York) pitched at an uneasy juncture between painting, sculpture, and...