Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 10, June

Annika Strom: Casey Kaplan. (Reviews: New York)
I HAVE NOTHING TO SAY. This wry anti-statement, with its overtones of Cagean Zen, is brushed in shades of dilute blue acrylic on an oversize sheet of white paper by Swedish artist and musician Annika Strom, forming the disingenuous introduction to...
A Thousand Words: Jennifer Pastor Talks about the Perfect Ride, 2003
It takes a lot of research for me to know exactly what I want to make, and to commit myself to it--a year of reading, traveling, and drawing, in the case of The Perfect Ride. I always feel like I'm starting from scratch, but with some problems or discontents...
Camera Libido: The Photography of Walter Pfeiffer
Imagine an optical device designed to project--and then to trace--a virtual image of desire onto the plane surface of everyday life. That would be Walter Pfeiffer's libidinal camera lucida. Since the late '6os, beginning in his native Zurich, Pfeiffer...
"Cardinales": Marco-Museu De Arte Contemporanea. (Reviews: Vigo, Spain)
Seldom does the inaugural show of a new museum so effectively bring together the very concept of exhibition with the architecture of the institution itself and its historical and social place in the city. The former prison that today houses the MARCO...
Carlos Garaicoa: Maison Europeenne De la Photographie. (Reviews: Paris)
"Got it!" you say to yourself when you make out the graffiried slogan NI CRISTO NI MARX NI BAKUNIN in the photo of the same title by Cuban artist Carlos Garaicoa. But the catch, for those who take the time to look a little more closely, is that the...
Chantal Michel: Kabinett Zorich/Kabinett Bern. (Reviews: Zurich/Bern)
Having abandoned her early plaster objects as being too "cool and technical," Chantal Michel has for the last few years made her own body the sculptural subject of her photographs, videos, and performances. Perched astride an eighteenth-century chest...
"Christian Schad and the Neue Sachlichkeit": Neue Galerie, New York. (Reviews)
Christian Schad's self-portrait of 1927, included in curators Jill Lloyd and Michael Peppiatt's large retrospective of the artist's work at the Neue Galerie in New York, is a haunting image that--partly because of the picture surface's seductive smoothness...
Christine Hill: Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art. (Reviews: Cleveland)
In late February, artist Christine Hill moved to Cleveland for five weeks to carry out a project that involved organizing and shooting a pilot for a television show. Toward this end, she studied the history of Cleveland, constructed a set, sought out...
Christopher Williams. (Portfolio)
Christopher Williams's photographs, individually, in series, and configured hyperconsciously with respect to given sites, often suggest a quasi documentary directness, yet they are open to metonymic drift and metaphoric condensation. He plays on foreground...
Cleveland Heights: Amy Taubin on American Splendor. (Film)
AMERICAN SPLENDOR, Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini's tatty, tender, volatile, and, yes, splendid biopic of Harvey Pekar, takes its name from the series of underground comic books that Pekar began publishing in 1976. Issued just about annually,...
Cosima Von Bonin: Friedrich Petzel Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
At the rate of one exhibition every dozen years, Cosima von Bonin seems to be perpetually having her first show in New York; and yet her subtlety and sophistication are unmistakably those of a mature artist who plays by her own rules. There's a built-in...
Dave Muller. (Top Ten)
Dave Muller is a Los Angeles-based artist and the operator of Three Day Weekend, an artist-run nomadic project space. His drawings will be on view this fail In the Biennale de Lyon and at The Approach in London. 1 WILD SUBURBAN PARROTS Before you...
David Rimanelli. (Entries)
April 11 TAKASHI MURAKAMI'S LOUIS VUITTON SHOW opens at Marianne Boesky. "Sandy Brant, Ingrid Sischy, and Marc Jacobs invite you..."--to Hell? Pert but raptorlike PR girls screened you at the door; a velvet rope herded the queue. Inside, a stifling...
Diller + Scofidio: Whitney Museum of American Art New York. (Reviews)
For all the recent talk of blurred boundaries between architecture and the visual arts, nobody's made much of a splash in both fields since Michelangelo hit Saint Peter's. The twentieth century spawned its share of architect/artists, such as Le Corbusier,...
Donald Baechler: Cheim & Read. (Reviews: New York)
In his most recent paintings, Donald Baechler's visual language has become increasingly abstract and iconic. Despite his reticence about relating his work directly to his life--he's admitted only that there might be "something vaguely autobiographical"...
"Eigene Systeme": Kunstverein Harburger Bahnhof/Institut Fur Zeitgenossische Kunst. (Reviews: Hamburg)
The attempt to counter prevailing political, economic, and social realities with an alternative model may be the most ubiquirous impulse in modern and contemporary art. "Eigene Systeme" (Autonomous systems) tried to situate itself in this dichotomy...
Elizabeth Magill: Artemis Greenberg Van Doren. (Reviews: New York)
Most landscape painting focuses on the land: its valleys, its horizons, its mountain peaks. But for Irish painter Elizabeth Magill, the sky is the main attraction. In her work, the earth is often nothing more than a hulking silhouette separated from...
Emily Jacir: Debs & Co. (Reviews: New York)
For "Where We Come From," her first solo exhibition in New York, Palestinian-American artist Emily Jacir posed a question to other Palestinians living around the world: "If I could do something for you, anywhere in Palestine, what would it be?" With...
Glenn Kaino: The Project. (Reviews: New York)
For his first solo show in New York, Los Angeles-based artist Glenn Kaino commandeered the gallery with two new sculptures, pointed in their social critique yet open-ended enough to allow multiple interpretations. Upstairs there was In Revolution (all...
Isidoro Valcarcel Medina: Fundacio Antoni Tapies. (Reviews: Barcelona)
Although he has been producing since the early '60s, Isidoro Valcarcel Medina was, until recently, unknown, even in Spain, outside a small group of followers. He works in a variety of registers, and his oeuvre runs the gamut from sociologically oriented...
James Welling: Regen Projects. (Reviews: Los Angeles)
In his fourth solo show at this gallery, James Welling presented recent works from three ongoing series that all borrow from--tweak, honor, and poke at--photographic traditions: the formal, the documentary, the conceptual, and the diaristic. The "Degrades"...
Jean-Francois Moriceau + Petra Mrzyk: Marcus Ritter. (Reviews: New York)
The art world is having a love affair with drawing. In the span of a year, we've had MOMA's "Drawing Now," the UCLA Hammer's "International Paper," and the traveling exhibition comprising Marcel Dzama, Neil Farber, and the rest of the Royal Art Lodge...
Katie Grinnan: ACME. (Reviews: Los Angeles)
Although I might wish for the death of photography almost every time I have to stomach it in a gallery (despite my whorish delectation of photographs daily), I think the idea of the death of any medium is absurd. This, however, is very different from...
Kevin Hanley. (Openings)
Two women lounge on beds, a camcorder on a tripod between them. The colors and patterns of their clothing and the decor evoke Matisse, while the mise-en-scene overtly references a tradition of abstracting the reclining figure in studio. The women chat...
Koo Jeong-A: Secession
On the day before her opening at the Secession, Koo Jeong-A locked herself in the basement in order to work on its difficult series of spaces. When she came out twenty-four hours later, the work was done: Between an emergency exit, an office, and a...
Lisa Milroy: Alan Cristea Gallery. (Reviews: London)
The paintings that made Lisa Milroy's reputation in the late '80s were concatenations of reiterated, similar-but-different images: tires in one painting, folded shirts in another, even Greek vases or (significantly enough, as will be seen) Japanese...
Locus Focus: Jean-Pierre Criqui Talks with Jean-Claude Lebensztejn
TO BE A STUDENT OF ART HISTORY IN PARIS DURING THE EARLY '80S WAS not especially exhilarating, but for me Jean-Claude Lebensztejn's courses at Nanterre University and at the Ecole Normale Superieure, like Hubert Damisch's seminars at the Ecole des...
Mark Dion: American Fine Arts/Aldrich Museum. (Reviews: New York/Ridgefield, CT)
Mark Dion, like Broodthaers or Beuys, is an artist with an idiosyncratic formal lexicon. But instead of mussels or felt, Dion's materials are taxidermied members of the "R-select species," varieties of trees living and dead, and the systems and accoutrements...
Markus Sixay: Chouakri Brahms. (Reviews: Berlin)
"Girls need modems." "I wish I was as sensitive as Marcel Proust." "Peanut butter on a very expensive Persian carper." "Far too ambitious." "Adieu avant-garde" (opening a Manzoni shit and flushing it down the toilet). "David Hasselhoff poster from...
Martin Boyce: Tramway. (Reviews: Glasgow)
Under the majestically scaled projection of the phrase THIS PLACE IS DREAMING, a choreography of sculptural elements evoked an urban romanticism that took the beholder toward horizons of futurist reverie. Or: Under the looming projection of the phrase...
Matti Braun: Showroom. (Reviews: London)
Matti Braun had flooded the front section of Showroom, turning it into a little lake. Slices of tree trunk scattered within this pool provided stepping stones by means of which the visitor could get from the door to the small flight of steps leading...
Michael Krebber: Greene Naftali Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
Ten years after his last New York solo show, Michael Krebber returned with an installation called Flaggs (Against Nature), 2003, that might have been a bit perplexing for an audience unfamiliar with his work. Krebber has been well known in Germany...
Mimmo Paladino: Centro per L'arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci. (Reviews: Prato)
Two things were most striking in this extensive retrospective bringing together nearly thirty years of Mimmo Paladino's work. The first was the prevalence in his work of the epic mode over anything subjective or individualist--his affinity with the...
Nan Goldin: Matthew Marks Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
To enjoy sex as glamorous apotheosis and still have the comforts of a messy, cozy, family-filled life; to have the cake of a hot fuck and the daily bread of long-standing intimate cohabitation too: Well, who wouldn't want a life like that? Fix all...
Nick Crowe. (Hot List)
Nick Crowe is an artist based in Manchester, England. His work can be seen at forthcoming exhibitions in Liverpool, Manchester, London, and Bilbao and at www.nickcrowe.net. IF THE INTERNET is the froth on the waves of misfortune that are sweeping...
Nicola De Maria: Cardi & Co./Galleria Cardi & Co. (Reviews: Milan)
It is not easy, today, to paint flowering meadow, with bright green grass and brilliant flowers, as only pure color and material can render. And yet Nicola de Maria continues to do so. A double exhibition in Milan featuring the artist's most recent...
Nina Konnemann: Galerie Borgmann Nathusius. (Reviews: Cologne)
Rarely have I felt so lost as in viewing the videos of Nina Konnemann. Lost, because I couldn't determine the place or the time period in which they were filmed, or even what was taking place in them. Were the events I was observing real, or had they...
One Year under the Mast: Alexander Alberro on the Fox
IN THE FALL OF 1974, JOSEPH KOSUTH, SARAH Charlesworth, Michael Corns, Preston Heller, Andrew Menard, and Mel Ramsden--all members of the New York wing of the art collective Art & Language (ALNY)--began to meet two or three times a week at The...
Paul Berger: Museum of Contemporary Photography. (Reviews: Chicago)
In the '60s and '70s a generation of photographers appeared, concerned with both the intrinsic nature of the camera and the social nature of the photograph, and began to investigate all aspects of what might be communicated in the act of shuttering...
Paul Sietsema: Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
You might think that an artist based in Los Angeles would be concerned, at least minimally, with entertainment value. Not so with Paul Sietsema, whose 16 mm film Empire, 2002, currently on view as part of the Whitney's Contemporary Series, is blissfully...
Purple Majesty: James Quandt Talks with Guy Maddin
"CULT" AND "COTERIE" CLING LIKE BARNACLES to the reputation of Winnipeg director Guy Maddin, a situation that may change with the release later this year of his new film, The Saddest Music in the World, starring Isabella Rossellini and scripted by...
"Reconfiguring Space: Blueprints for Art in General"; Art in General. (Reviews: New York)
In a conversation with Allan Kaprow published in Arts Yearbook's "Museum World" (1967), Robert Smithson speculated about the possibility of a museum composed of different kinds of emptiness. How to create flexible, supportive open space remains the...
Richard Tuttle: Sperone Westwater. (Reviews: New York)
A kind of quirky retrospective, this exhibition begins with Richard Tuttle's latest work, a series of "20 Pearls" (all 2003), moves a year backward to sixteen "Blue/Red, Phase: Drawings," then goes further back to the 1997 Botanic Rendering: Inverleith...
Room for a View: Daniel Birnbaum on the Schaulager. (News)
SAY YOU'RE WILLING to drop a few million on a piece of art built out of cheese and chocolate, or maybe Vaseline and honey. Well, you're not alone, and you'll probably be happy with your new acquisition so long as it's nicely installed and cared for....
Sarah Michelson: The Kitchen/P.S. 122. (Reviews: New York)
Choreographer Sarah Michelson transforms performance spaces in the most extraordinary ways. For Part I of Shadowmann at the Kitchen, she spun the large black-box theater around so that the traditional arrangement of audience and performance was reversed....
Sean Shanahan: Dublin City Gallery the Hugh Lane. (Reviews: Dublin)
This suite of twelve paintings was produced in response to an invitation to present a site-specific installation in the Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery of Modern Art. Originally the vision of Irish picture dealer Hugh Lane, the Municipal Gallery remained...
Shaggy Dogg: Gareth James on Colin De Land. (Passages)
IT WAS A DARK AND STORMY NIGHT, and I was standing, freezing, outside American Fine Arts, Co., when a shiny new purple pickup truck arrived with its ferocious cargo: The Voluptuous Horror of Karen Black. Naked save for a coat of brightly colored body...
Stan Douglas: David Zwirner. (Reviews: New York)
Stan Douglas's latest work, the video installation Suspiria, 2002/2003, is as visually weird and conceptually sophisticated as anything he has ever produced. Titled after Dario Argenro's classic horror film of 1977, the piece was created for Documenta...
Stephen Dean: Henry Urbach Architecture. (Reviews: New York)
Stephen Dean's Pulse, 2001, was one of the few high points of the 2002 Whitney Biennial, and with his newest video, he again delves into the cultural use of color. Volta, 2002-2003, begins with a smattering of staccato horns and a close-up of a rippling...
Tacita Dean: Kunstverein Fur Die Rheinlande Und Westfalen
ZTRATA, Czech for "loss," is written in white chalk on a blackboard. A young man erases the word with a washcloth that he then throws out the window--a concrete demonstration of the word's meaning. This scene from Tacita Dean's film of the same name,...
Takashi Murakami: Marianne Boesky. (Reviews: New York)
Japan's big twenty-first-century export is cuteness, and it's one of Takashi Murakami's favorite modes, infusing his mushrooms, flowers, and the ubiquitous Mr. DOB. In Murakami's latest gallery show, a panda appears in a sculpture, several paintings,...
Tara Donovan: Ace Gallery. (Reviews: New York)
Tara Donovan's work is high in--call it a howthe...whathe...jeez factor. It has the kind of labor-intensiveness feasible in art on a miniature scale, embroidery perhaps, but it leans to the huge; and the hugeness is often constituted of extraordinarily...
Theresa Hak Kyung Cha: Bronx Museum of the Arts. (Reviews: New York)
Theresa Hak Kyung Cha died in 1982 at age thirty-one, but "The Dream of the Audience," curated by Constance M. Lewallen and originating at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (where Cha's own is housed), was the first major retrospective...
Third Taipei Biennial: Taipei Fine Arts Museum. (Reviews: Taipei)
Viewers entering the Taipei Fine Arts Museum were immediately confronted by Arena, 1997, Rita McBride's enormous, semicircular sculpture in the form of curved empty stadium bleachers made of Kevlar. McBride put the viewers on stage, so to speak, in...
Tony Smith: Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York. (Reviews)
One pleasant surprise of Tony Smith's retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art (five years ago already!) was the group of paintings known as the "Louisenberg" series, dating from 1953-55, together with a related set begun at the same time but completed...
Valie Export: Galerie Charim. (Reviews: Vienna)
The pack of Smart Export cigarettes, an Austrian brand, looks a bit worse for the wear--but it is an icon. Accordingly, it is displayed in the foyer in the celebratory manner reserved for relics. The initiated will experience a mild thrill: This is...
Won Ju Lim: Patrick Painter. (Reviews: Los Angeles)
Won Ju Lim is known for groupings of foamcore and Plexiglas architectural forms illuminated by still and moving projections of urban and industrial landscapes from within and dramatically lit from without. The structures double as screens or refraction...