Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 10, Summer

Ace Gallery: Thomas Nozkowski. (Reviews)
The art-review format tends to encourage nutshell accounts of an artist's output, which shouldn't be so hard in the case of Thomas Nozkowski. If you're at all familiar with his work, you'll recognize his paintings when you see them. They're generally...
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Art of the Dealer. (News)
"SKIS WITH VALENTINO, dines with Audrey Hepburn and Elizabeth Taylor ... lives on the Concorde." Remember the roaring '80s, when Zurich-based art dealer deluxe Thomas Ammann trotted the globe, carting home the finest art of the day? The boldface credentials...
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Asprey Jacques: Tania Kovats. (Reviews)
The greater an object's size, according to Edmund Burke, the more violently it excites the retina: Thus giant objects give rise to perceptions of the sublime. His contemporary Richard Payne Knight scathingly responded that if Burke's physiological...
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A Thousand Words: Thomas Ruff Talks about "L.M.V.D.R."
Long before the renovations of Krefeld's Haus Lange and Haus Esters were completed last summer, Julian Heynen was planning the inaugural exhibition. He wanted the show to respect the two houses' use for more than fifteen years as museums of contemporary...
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Awkward Sage: Balthus, 1908-2001. (Passages)
BALTHAZAR KLOSSOWSKI, OR BALTHUS, or the Count de Rola, as he preferred to be known later in life, died February 18 at the age of 92. His passing did not go unmarked: U2 frontman Bono sang a tribute at his funeral, and critics Michael Kimmelman and...
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Baumgartner Gallery: Rainer Ganahl. (Reviews)
For the past several years, Rainer Ganahl has been lurking in the corridors of higher learning, monitoring the often unglamorous sites where knowledge is acquired and transmitted. He's produced long-term projects on the instruction of foreign languages...
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Borgmann-Nathusius: Douglas Wada. (Reviews)
Douglas Wada's new paintings depict icons of American life--things that otherwise tend to escape notice, like subway seats, garbage cans, lockers, streetlights, air conditioners, suitcases, and loudspeakers. Wada isolates individual objects in a flat,...
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California Palace of the Legion of honor/Crown Point Press: John Cage. (Reviews)
During the last fifteen years of his life, avant-garde composer John Cage produced a substantial body of visual art, mainly in the form of prints. Beginning in 1978, he visited Crown Point Press for a week or two almost every year. There, working closely...
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Cameron Jamie. (Openings)
Years before I saw any of Cameron Jamie's work, the artist Larry Johnson had told me about "this guy who does 'apartment wrestling'"--or at least performance that takes that softcore-porn subgenre as its point of departure. Eventually I met the artist...
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Come Again? (Film/TV)
"I DREAMED I WAS PLAYING Handel's Messiah," a temporarily overworked cellist told me one Christmas, "and then I woke up and it was true!" Handel's musical depiction of the passion and resurrection of Christ has provided seasonal employment for musicians...
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Customs Man
Best known outside the UK for his sardonic send-ups of all things English, Mark Wallinger has emerged as a figure whose themes extend well beyond the manners and mores of the land of John Bull. On the occasion of the artist's selection as Britain's...
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David Zwirner: Katy Schimert. (Reviews)
Casts of antique statuary have formed the backbone of artists' education since the late Renaissance. Gathered in laboratory-like settings of ateliers and arts academies across Europe and the Americas, such figurative models demonstrate the standards...
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Debs & Co.: Aaron Cobbett. (Reviews)
Like Warhol and Johns, Aaron Cobbett started out in the trenches of fashion, dressing windows for Henri Bendel and Bergdorf Goodman. He moved into photography in the late '80s, taking pictures of drag queens and boys downtown and publishing them in...
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Deitch Projects: Martin Kersels. (Reviews)
Those crashing, rhythmic thuds you heard on entering Martin Kersels's latest show were the sounds of a little world being turned upside down. Literally. This world was the nascently putrescent, nascently pubescent milieu of a middle-class American...
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Dunedin Public Art Gallery: Peter Peryer. (Reviews)
Peter Peryer's best-known photograph may be the dead cow with legs akimbo that featured on the poster and the cover of the catalogue for Second Nature, his 1995-97 traveling exhibition curated by Peter Weiermair and Gregory Burke. But there is a back...
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Emily Tsingou Gallery: Kate Bright. (Reviews)
Ever since modernism taught us the apparently unbreakable habit of reading works of art self-referentially, illusionism no longer concerns what a painting shows, only what it is. For instance, the work of a number of painters (Karen Kilimnik is a key...
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Feigen Contemporary: Ray Johnson. (Reviews)
The moniker has stuck since Grace Glueck coined it in 1965, but Ray Johnson's days as "New York's most famous unknown artist" are numbered. In the six years since his death, the reclusive collagist has been the subject of a traveling retrospective...
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Gagosian Gallery: Ellen Gallagher. (Reviews)
Slyly lovely and perversely indirect, Ellen Gallagher's work concerns inscription and sign systems and addresses the fragmentations and provocations of racialized identity. She belongs to a generation of young artists who infuse Minimalist form with...
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Gagosian Gallery: Vanessa Beecroft. (Reviews)
I'd like to call Vanessa Beecroft the Leni Riefenstahl of performance art, but that wouldn't be fair. Her fascism's fake: No menace or power or insanity, beyond capital, underwrites her project. (She described VB45, her February performance at the...
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Galeria Tomas March: Federico Guzman. (Reviews)
With so many works taking the body as the basis of their aesthetic discourse, it comes as a relief to find an artist who reflects on other living materials. Federico Guzman deals with plants as organic beings on which humankind has left a considerable...
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Galerie Eigen + Art: Olaf Nicolai. (Reviews)
In Germany, the opposition between realism and abstraction has always been intertwined with the colliding political ideologies of east and west. Olaf Nicolai, an artist of East German origin, anticipates the next stage in this cultural battle with...
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Galerie Fur Zeitenossische Kunst: Jun Yang. (Reviews)
Jun Yang's method is simple and catchy: juxtaposing Western symbols with Eastern ones. The large, fifteen-piece wall work From... D./How to Do That?, 2001, in the style of instruction cards provided on airplanes, for instance, juxtaposes Eastern and...
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Galleria Gian Carla Zanutti: Davide Bertocchi. (Reviews)
The three works Davide Bertoccbi presented here were each quite different but were subtly linked by an idea. In the gallery's single room, what first struck the viewer was Nucleo (Nucleus; all works 2000), a large sphere in dark fiberglass-reinforced...
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Galleria Lia Rumma: Clegg & Guttmann. (Reviews)
Books lined up on shelves can elicit strong emotions. There is the desire to know and the pleasure of availing oneself of a cultural accumulation that has already taken place. The idea that one need only extend a hand to delve into all sorts of histories,...
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Grave New World. (News)
FROM THE STREET, everything looks more or less the way it has since the Baroque era. Vienna's onceupon-a-time imperial stables, commissioned by Emperor Karl VI in the early eighteenth century, present an unadorned two-story facade stretching about...
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Greene Naftali: Rachel Harrison. (Reviews)
You might have hesitated at the gallery door, thinking the installation was still in progress, what with all the big folded sheets of brown corrugated cardboard standing there as if they'd just been removed from some large rectangular objects. A few...
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Hire Up. (News)
Come October, the Swedes take over the Japanese capital with a two-week cultural festival dubbed "Swedish Style in Tokyo." Over in the Roppongi district, the Mori Arts Center Project Space will honor the event in an area called the "New Tokyo Life...
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Kunsthaus Zurich: "Hypermental". (Reviews)
The title of an exhibition curated by Bice Curiger precedes it like a magical incantation, the better to drift and resonate in one's brain among the exhibition's wealth of works: "Endstation Sehnsucht" (A streetcar named desire), 1994; "Signs and Wonders,"...
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Lance Fung Gallery: Top Changtrakul. (Reviews)
Not long ago, uniformed Thai policemen raided Top Changtrakul's tiny studio in the countryside outside Bangkok, confiscated most of his equipment, and hauled him off to jail. Or did they? A video included as part of this show documents the arrest,...
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Lombard-Freid Fine Arts: Glen Baxter. (Reviews)
Glen Baxter's work hasn't changed much, happily, since he last showed it in New York, fifteen years ago; he remains one of the few artists who will make you burst out laughing, or at least who will do so on purpose. And his devices to manage this trick...
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Luigi Ontani: P.S. 1, New York
Luigi Ontani is that rare bird of art: an unforgettable face, a world-class dandy, and a redoubtable if lovably eccentric presence on the international art-world circuit. In this first US retrospective of his multifaceted output--painting, sculpture,...
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Metro Pictures: Jim Shaw. (Reviews)
Happily for horror vacuists, Jim Shaw's recycling of cultural detritus continues unabated. For six years his increasingly less nocturnal "Dream Project" has functioned as a reservoir of flotsam and jetsam drawn from surrealist installation, comic books,...
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Monica De Cardenas: Maurizio Arcangeli. (Reviews)
The word, the signifier that defines the word, the object the word indicates--these make up the system with which Maurizia Arcangeli always has operated. The formal correspondence between the words un quadro (a painting) or una scultura (a sculpture)...
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Moody Gallery: Al Souza. (Reviews)
Al Souza's extravagant "paintings" are so visually disruptive they demand to be stared at long and hard--that is, if you can manage to fix your gaze on them at all. Stand before these works, composed of thousands of layered jigsaw-puzzle pieces, loose...
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Musee D'art Moderne et Contemporain: Alain Sechas. (Reviews)
Whether in the form of sculpture, installation, or video, the work of Alain Sechas always retains a sort of primary allegiance to drawing. Using the style of comics and cartoons to put across his loony worldview, this French artist has populated his...
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Museu De Arte Moderna: Ernesto Neto. (Reviews)
The crossover between art and life has been a defining feature of much of the art from Rio de Janeiro that has gained international attention in the last few years. The Neo-concrete art of Lygia Clark and Helio Oiticica in the '50s and '60s explored...
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Nikolaj Copenhagen Contemporary Art Center: William Anastasi. (Reviews)
William Anastasi explores the elementary constituents of art--the viewing space, the viewer, pictorial space and its framing, time, chance, decision, etc.--and thereby plays with artistic cognition in its various forms. This retrospective (and a concurrent...
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Pacewildenstein: Barbara Hepworth. (Reviews)
Barbara Hepworth was a master of subtle form. Though her abstract works often contain figurative allusions, the sculptures are better understood on a purely formal level: In Two Faces, 1969, for instance, it is the different placement of the holes...
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Peter Miller Gallery: Jason Salavon. (Reviews)
It might not seem that Internet porn bears any similarity to houses for sale in Orange County, or that American-made shoes have anything in common with the top-grossing movies in history. But these and other categories are equally rich fodder for Jason...
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Philip-Lorca diCorcia. (Portfolio)
This time Philip-Lorca diCorcia's stage set is Mayor Giuliani's tarted-up Times Square, although you'd hardly guess it from the pictures. The photographer's signature electronic flash units are hidden in a walkway beneath a contractor's scaffolding,...
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"Picasso Erotique": Galerie Nationale Du Jeu De Paume, Paris
You'd think every angle on Picasso had been worked to death by now--that each period, style, genre, and subject had already chalked up its own blockbuster exhibition. So on seeing this show's title, one could only wonder: Why hasn't it been done before?...
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Plastic Art. (Film/TV)
ON JAPANESE TV, the later the hour, the weirder the programming. After midnight (when station directors and major sponsors check out), things really get interesting. Anything goes--from violent cartoons to chat shows hosted by nubile young things in...
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Rainmaker
This May 17, TSAI MING-LIANG's fifth feature film, Et la-bas, quelle heure est-il? (What time is it there?), premiered at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival. Now, New York audiences will have a chance to assess the Taipei-based filmmaker's startling oeuvre....
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Site Odeon[degrees] 5: Pascal Convert. (Reviews)
The exhibition began outside, on the street: Drawings were painted on the gallery windows--long, multicolor, swirling, interlaced strokes. They were on the walls, too, one saw, once past the door. These traces belong to the series "Native Drawings,"...
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"Sol LeWitt Incomplete Open Cubes": Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, CT
The Wadsworth Atheneum's recent Sol LeWitt exhibition included just one of the artist's projects--and everything else in the museum. Curator Nicholas Baume scattered LeWitt's 1974 "Variations of Incomplete Open Cubes" throughout the Wadsworth's venerable...
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Still against Himself
CLYFFORD STILL's sustained disappearing act has made his achievement among the most elusive of AbEx masters. Now, as Washington, DC's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden opens a survey billed as a major "reintroduction" to the painter's oeuvre, art...
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Tacita Dean: Museu D'art Contemporani De Barcelona
Museum technical staff repairing one of nine 16-mm projectors ... Two visits, a short time apart, to the MACBA survey of Tacita Dean's work give the impression that this conceit might in fact be part of the show. The gimpy, not exactly factory-new...
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Tate liverpool/Yorkshire Sculpture Park: William Tucker. (Reviews)
William Tucker's career has been sliced down the middle. Born in 1935, he made his name in the '60s as one of the younger generation of abstract sculptors associated with Anthony Caro at St. Martin's School of Art in London. In 1974, Tucker published...
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The Big Show
THE BIG SHOW IS A SERIES OF EXHIBITIONS ON GLOBALIZATION. Three separate exhibitions will feature a critical platform for approaching issues of exoticism, political correctness, collective memory, alterity and utopia in a confronting way. In order...
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Top Ten
Matthew Higgs is associate director of exhibitions at the ICA, London, where he curated "City Racing 1988-1998: A Partial Account." His multiartist "I Want More... and More... "is on view at the Temple Bar Gallery in Dublin. 1 RODNEY GRAHAM Vancouver-based...
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Various Locations: "Demokratie[R]". (Reviews)
The word "Demokratie" (Democracy), printed in white, gleams on a black background on as many as 800 billboard-size posters throughout Vienna. One of the great totemic ideals of the twentieth century is thus emblazoned, without further comment, across...
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Walker Art Center: "Painting at the Edge of the World". (Reviews)
An exhibition featuring thirty international artists, "Painting at the Edge of the World" reported on the embattled status of painting after a century's worth of challenges from all sides. The medium has suffered attacks by Conceptualists and performance...
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Wayne Thiebaud. (First Break)
JUSTIN SPRING revisits Wayne Thiebaud's 1962 New York debut at the Allan Stone Gallery and the critical response that helped usher in the Pop era. IN 1962, Wayne K. Thiebaud was forty-one. Recently divorced and remarried, he had just taken a job...
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"Workspheres": Museum of Modern Art, New York
Our habitat is being restructured on an order of magnitude beyond ken. What began as a technological revolution is already re-forming our every implement and reorganizing our every social arrangement. The new economy, the super-bull market, global...
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Wrap Session
FEW MUSEUMS ARE LINKED TO THE NAME OF AN ARCHITECT AS DECIDEDLY AS THE GUGGENHEIM IS TO FRANK GEHRY'S, SO IT IS ONLY FITTING THAT THE CURRENT FULL-DRESS RETROSPECTIVE OF THE FIGURE RESPONSIBLE FOR GUGGENHEIM BILBAO FINDS ITS HOME AT THE INSTITUTION'S...
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