Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 9, May

'80S Something
The New York art world's self-imposed amnesia regarding the '80s finds its purest expression in our contemporary response to the art of David Salle. As the archetypal bad boy of a generation that defined itself through its unmitigated brashness (Julian...
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Allied Forces
If (or when) VEnice's pavilions crumble elegantly into the Adriatic, a lot of history will go with them - and not just art history. Embarrassing reminders of nineteenth-century imperial hubris, they have recently become unofficial and inhospitable...
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Brice Marden
DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART People are drawn to Brice Marden's paintings, but I'm not convinced they know why, even his collectors and curators. They share in the fascination, but without much understanding. I too like Marden's art. The situation is a...
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Brother's Keepers
The brothers Vincent and Theo are buried side by side in the cemetery of Auvers-sur-Oise, a village some twenty miles north of Paris; and their graves have made the destination a place of pilgrimage. When van Gogh arrived in Auvers in May 1890, following...
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Charles Ray
MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES "What I wish to point out here is that the entire enterprise of art making provides the ground for finding the limits and possibilities of certain kinds of behavior." - Robert Morris, Artforum, 1970 ...
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Cheek to Chic
ON THE EVE OF PAINTER GARY HUME'S BRITISH PAVILION SURVEY AT THE 48TH VENICE BIENNALE, LISA LIEBMANN LOOKS BACK AT A DECADE OF WORK AND AHEAD TO THE JUNE OPENING. Gary Hume has created a New Look for painting with the satin-gloved fist of a militant....
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Contingency Plan
Anyone looking for a systematic account of modernism in T.J. Clark's new book, Farewell to an Idea, will be disappointed. Clark, whose foundational work in the social history of art has furnished some of the strongest readings of cultural modernity...
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Direct Hit
When the news broke this March that Jeremy Strick had been named the new director of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, hardly a ripple was felt in art-world waters, although there was a strong undercurrent of curiosity. After more than fifteen...
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Eric Fischl, 'Inside Out,' 1982
It isn't often today, in this age of cynicism, irony, and other well-oiled suits of shiny emotional armor, that one enters a museum or gallery and suddenly finds oneself standing stunned before a contemporary work of art. The typical response to the...
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French Toast
Back in my student days I caught Jules and Jim practically every time it came around to a repertory house or college film society. I adored it, I knew it by heart, and I always walked out on a cloud, and so I wasn't prepared, on seeing Francois Truffaut's...
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Henri Michaux
WHITECHAPEL ART GALLERY, LONDON Most writers are more or less secretly envious of the painter's or sculptor's good fortune in being able to deal with physical stuff you can push around, rather than the infuriatingly inward substance that is language....
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Hudson News
In March 1998, Robert Ryman, Walter De Maria, and Richard Serra traveled from Manhattan to an obscure town upstate. They weren't looking for weekend real estate but checking out the Hudson Valley site of the newest Dia Center for the Arts, in Beacon,...
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Late Mass
As its official opening date approaches, it is difficult to know what to say about the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art. Conceived in 1986 as the world's largest space for the exhibition of large-scale contemporary works, the project languished...
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Like New
For much of the '90s, the New Museum of Contemporary Art wasn't high on the list of must-see New York venues. Its feisty glory days a thing of the past, the institution, with its uninviting space and an exhibition program that was spotty at best, seemed...
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Michael Bevilacqua
A strangely personalized panoply of graphic riffs on the latest and greatest in fashion, advertising, movies, other artists, and most important, music, Michael Bevilacqua's painting amounts to a virtual psychedelic assault of consumer culture. His...
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Missing in Action
Though the Japanese group Gutai has received some exposure in the US in recent years, most notably in the 1994 "Japanese Art After 1945: Scream Against the Sky" exhibition (at the SoHo Guggenheim, New York, and SF MOMA) and 1998's "Out of Actions"...
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Prince of Tides
Robert Storr with Harald Szeemann Harald Szeemann is the grand, though not so very old, man of avant-garde exhibition-making in Europe. When he speaks despairingly or appreciatively of his "sons" or "grandsons" - from Rudi Fuchs at the Stedelijk...
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Ronald Bladen
P.S. 1 Ronald Bladen is today a somewhat obscure figure. This was not always so. His Three Elements, 1965, identical rhomboids perched at a 65-degree angle, was a standout in the Jewish Museum's landmark "Primary Structures" in 1966, vying for attention...
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Signs and the Times
What can one say about David Salle's paintings on the eve of his European retrospective? Well, at the very least, one can say that the paintings must exist for the retrospective to take place. They must be there, on the wall, for the party to begin....
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Submarine Launching
This June sees the opening of the Museu de Serralves, Portugal's first major museum devoted exclusively to contemporary art. Designed by renowned Portuguese architect Alvaro Silva and located in the northern-coast city of Porto, the institution is...
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Subway Series
"Hey, that's nice," quickly followed by "Uh-oh." So goes the near-unanimous reaction of the art world to the probable merger of the august, hyper-institutional Museum of Modern Art and the capaciously funky P.S. I Contemporary Arts Center. To recapitulate,...
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"The American Century: Art & Culture 1900-2000."
WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART The question "What is American in American art?" has perhaps been asked ever since the first easel was pitched on colonial soil. Answers, when they have not been contested outright, are at best deemed woefully inadequate....
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Top Ten
1 "Ooo, don't come near me!" my grandmother said as I went to kiss her good-bye. "Why, Gran, have you got that flu?" I innocently asked. "No," she said, wafting the air around her, "I just fluffed." Since bowel movement has always been a subject of...
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Vim and Rigor
Nelson Goodman's work touched on so many fields - philosophy, of course, but also the arts, the sciences, and psychology - that it is difficult for anyone to appreciate, much less summarize, what it has all meant for us, or even to specify the "us"...
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Whole in Six
Reviewing the Whitney Biennial of American Art has gotten to be something like playing a round of golf just to get rid of pent-up aggression. Let's see, which club will we whack the vulnerable little ball with this year? If the play is from the middle...
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