Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 10, Summer

Alec Soth: Yossi Milo Gallery
In 1999, photographer Alec Soth left his hometown of Minneapolis to take a voyage down the Mississippi River, and found on its banks a world at once ancient and brand-new. He discovered submerged mattresses in dark sloughs in Arkansas; mustachioed...
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Ann-Sofi Siden: Galeria Pepe Cobo
A long, low wooden bench faced a succession of videos projected onto the wall by five projectors. The thirty-five-minute-long 3MPH (Horse to Rocket), 2003, begins mysteriously, with the noise of hoofbeats but no image. Eventually one sees a woman dressed...
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Anri Sala: Musee d'Art Moderne De la Ville De Paris
ANRI SALA MUSEE D'ART MODERNE DE LA VILLE DE PARIS There is something soothing and even soporific about repetition; it is, after all, the foundation not only of lullabies but also of certain hypnotic techniques. Sometimes, however, the monotony...
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Anthony McCall: Talks about His "Solid Light" Films
More than thirty years after British-born artist Anthony McCall created his now-legendary Line Describing a Cone, the first of his "solid light" films, the elegantly simple 1973 work--a projected white dot that slowly grows over thirty minutes into...
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Atlas Group/Walid Raad: Galerie Sfeir-Semler
Writing history is never easy. Especially if you come from Lebanon, whose history has been recorded mostly from a Western perspective. Atlas Group/Walid Raad has already essayed a new take on it: the attempt to investigate present-day Lebanon from...
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Bed and Puppet: Jonathan Gilmore on William Kentridge's Ritorno d'Ulisse
ALTHOUGH IT STANDS as a paradigm of a Gesamtkunstwerk, opera has largely relegated the visual arts to only a subsidiary role: as costume, scene, and setting, both literal and figurative background to the expressive voice. In William Kentridge's multimedia...
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"Before the End": Le Consortium
"Before the End" is an exhibition for two voices: on the one hand, that of critic and curator Stephanie Moisdon-Tremblay, who has assembled about twenty "first" works by artists inspired by the legacy of Conceptualism, chosen by the artists themselves;...
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Behind the Seams
IN MY LAST YEAR IN COLLEGE I STARTED PAINTING REALISTICALLY partly, I think, because Minimal art was being well-meaningly shoved down my throat. Yet when I graduated and moved to New York in 1976 and saw these works in person, and in the time that...
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Being Nan Goldin: David Rimanelli Gives His Class Homework
FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS, I have given "Make Your Own Nan Goldin" as an assignment to the undergrads in my "Contemporary Art" survey course at New York University's Steinhardt School. At the beginning of the semester I juxtaposed two contemporaneous...
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Catherine Sullivan: Angel Orensanz Foundation/Whitney Museum of American Art
Catherine Sullivan is in the process of creating an exciting body of work that dissects the meaning of the word "to perform." Operating separately in both video and live performance, she creates paired installations and theater works that share source...
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Chairmen of the Boards: Thad Ziolkowski on Riding Giants
THE POPULAR IMAGE OF SURFING--a rider on a large, wind-groomed wave--is, alas, an idealization. Waves are bad more often than good, even (in fact, especially) at world-class breaks like Pipeline. Hence surters travel when they can, in the hope that...
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Cheyney Thompson: Andrew Kreps Gallery
One might not guess that one of Louisianaborn, New York-based artist Cheyney Thompson's inspirations is Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin. But, starting with his 2002 exhibition "1 Scenario + 1 Situation," also at this gallery, the artist has hoped that...
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Claudia and Julia Muller: Kunstmuseum Thun
Since the sisters Claudia and Julia Muller started working together twelve years ago, their drawings--on paper, applied directly to the wall, and on video--have become acknowledged as major contributions to the current Swiss art scene. This exhibition...
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David Batchelor: Ikon Gallery
The title of David Batchelor's first major solo show at a public institution, "Shiny-Dirty," neatly encapsulated the beat-up brilliance of his trademark stacks of reconditioned light boxes and fleets of low-slung, four-wheeled monochromes. Expanding...
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David Bunn: Angles Gallery
David Bunn acquired the roughly seven million cards that made up the Los Angeles Central Library's now-obsolete card catalogue in 1990. In 1993, he installed 9,506 of them in the library's two new elevator shafts in such a way that they could be viewed...
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Ed Ruscha Grand Tourist
Like scene-stealing extras, the photographs that fill Ed Ruscha's books of the '60s have long refused to play a supporting role in his artistic production. Nevertheless, as early as 1965, the artist insisted that the pictures in Twentysix Gasoline...
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Euan Macdonald: Galerie Zink & Gegner
In a relatively small space, the Scottish-born, Los Angeles-based artist Euan Macdonald presented a few recent works, all involving a certain perceptual and conceptual subtlety. The most intriguing among them was the DVD Healer, 2002, projected on...
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Follow the Crowd: Tom Vanderbilt on New-Model Flash Mobs
IN AN OBSCURE 1973 STORY titled "Flash Crowd," the science-fiction writer Larry Niven describes how an argument at a shopping mall, which happened to be covered by a news crew, swells into a riot. The broadcast riot in turn attracts the attention of...
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Giuseppe Penone: Drawing Center, New York
GIUSEPPE PENONE DRAWING CENTER, NEW YORK KIKI SMITH MOMA QNS, NEW YORK Fable I: "Giuseppe Penone: The Imprint of Drawing." In the anteroom of the Drawing Center, a giant barred the way, buried up to his eyebrows, from which his colossal...
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Glenn Brown: Gagosian Gallery
As an appropriationist painter whose technique is as close to perfect as one could imagine, the challenge for Glenn Brown has often been simply to choose the most interesting source material. And while he has emphasized the extent to which he manipulates...
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Invisible Hand
IT IS STRIKING TO ME THAT DONALD JUDD'S WORK IS DISCUSSED almost entirely without reference to "the hand." Although it is usually said that his works were industrially produced, there is very little talk about how these objects actually came into being....
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JEM Southam: Robert Mann Gallery
The simple yet compelling concept behind this quiet show of several series of photographs matched a sense of modesty in the images themselves. Bristolborn photographer Jem Southam visits rural sites, mainly in the south of England, several times over...
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Jim Lambie: Anton Kern Gallery
"Too many stripes can finally drive you mad," Michel Pastoureau, the chief historian of this elemental pattern, has observed. But how many is too many? Glasgow-based artist Jim Lambie seems determined to find out. Since 1999, Lambie has been completely...
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John Miller: Metro Pictures
Scatological humor is probably as old as culture itself--but in art of the '80s and early '90s, jokes about excrement proliferated, provoking a lot of nervous laughter. RUN FROM FEAR/FUN FROM REAR--that's one of the ways Bruce Nauman put it. He also...
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John Waters: New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York
JOHN WATERS NEW MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, NEW YORK In 1964, John Waters shot his first short film, Hag in a Black Leather Jacket, using shoplifted film stock and a Brownie 8 mm movie camera given to him by his grandmother for his seventeenth...
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June Leaf: Edward Thorp Gallery
If a style can be detected in the half century's worth of drawings and paintings by June Leaf that were gathered here recently, it might be called abstract surrealism. Lines hastily thrown together with a sort of jittery, automatist flair form more...
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Kara Walker: The Fabric Workshop and Museum
Fascinating and treacherous, Kara Walker's new multimedia installation, titled Fibbergibbet and Mumbo Jumbo: Kara E. Walker in Two Acts, 2004, reconstructs a swamp-side antebellum campsite that happens to be haunted by a phantasmagoria of colored projections....
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Kirsten Stoltmann: 1R Gallery
A certain fantasy of the American Southwest as barren, inhospitable, timeless, stony, and impassive--Mars with sagebrush--has long held a grip on the American imagination. Kirsten Stoltmann, who lived in the Midwest before her recent relocation to...
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Language in the Vicinity of Art: Artists' Writings, 1960-1975
"I DON'T LIKE THE INCORPORATION OF THE NAMABLE IN SOULPTURE" Carl Andre's observation from a 1968 interview reflects on the absence of image or allusion in advanced art of the period, but it remains pithily ironic: It is one hallmark of American art...
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Leon Ferrari: Ruth Benzacar Galeria De Arte
Trying to read Leon Ferrari's scribbles is almost embarrassing. It's like intruding on a private realm, seeing things never meant for our eyes, overhearing a whispered conversation. Indeed, this selection of Ferrari's drawings, curated by Victoria...
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Lucy Gunning: Matt's Gallery
The last decade or so has seen a tremendous flowering of video- and film-based work by English artists--one thinks of Tacita Dean, Tracey Emin, Isaac Julien, Steve McQueen, Georgina Starr, Gillian Wearing, and Jane and Louise Wilson, among others....
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Lucy McKenzie
The work of Glasgow-based artist Lucy McKenzie can be seen in solo exhibitions at Cabinet, London, through July, and at the ICA Boston this fall. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 1 DEATHWATCH Bertrand Tavernier's depressing projection of tomorrow's world...
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Lucy Skaer: Counter Gallery
Lucy Skaer's London solo debut was entitled "The Problem in Seven Parts,'" with the ostensible problem--intimated by the fact that this exhibition of pinned-up drawings came in not seven but nine segments--being this: Skaer appreciates material facts...
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Marco Papa: Viafarini
History is strewn with talents who emerge and then recede into the shadows. Marco Papa has chosen the story of Gene Anthony Ray to exemplify this phenomenon. After being selected to portray the character Leroy in the film Fame (1980), the talented...
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Marzia Migliora: Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo
Beginning in 1986 the Hungarian writer Agota Kristof published a trilogy of lucid, merciless novels, The Notebook, The Proof, and The Third Lie, which tell the story of a pair of twins who, abandoned by their mother, use their relentless intelligence...
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Michael Mahalchick: Canada Gallery
Michael Mahalchick weaves and stitches scraps of scavenged cloth into raggedy wall hangings, lumpy totems, and squat, motley creatures, celebrating both quiet industry and its flip side, sensual languor. One favorite trope is to take properly horizontal...
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Michael Snow: Jack Shainman Gallery
Though he's best known for now-classic experimental films such as Wavelength, 1966-67, and La Region centrale, 1971, Michael Snow's gallery exhibition "Powers of Two" revealed him to be a hyperprolific artist whose mad-scientist inventiveness has engaged...
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Nicole Eisenman: Leo Koenig Inc
Yes, this is a review of that Nicole Eisenman, who, officially dubbed a "bad girl" in 1993, has received far too little critical consideration outside that nomenclature. Though the artist's numerous virtuosic paintings, drawings, installations, and...
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No More Scale: The Experience of Size in Contemporary Sculpture
The appropriation of the gigantic on the part of commodity relations marks the magicalization of the commodity, the final masking of the gigantic apparatus which is the nature of class relations themselves. --Susan Stewart, On Longing: Narratives of...
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"Non-Standard Architectures": Centre Georges Pompidou
On the TV series Star Trek, whenever people are hungry, they walk to a terminal and say the word "cake," and within seconds the object of desire materializes out of thin air. "Non-Standard Architectures" would be a Trekkie's wet dream: Order a house...
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Not Vital: Sperone Westwater
A minimalist fabulist you might call him: In most of the sculpture here, the Swiss artist Not Vital combines Euclidean geometries with children's-book contents. Camel, 2004, comprises sixteen sealed silver spheres, each nine inches in diameter, and...
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Oedipus Directs: Isaac Julien on Baadasssss!
MELVIN VAN PEEBLES'S now-legendary Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (which he wrote, directed, produced, and starred in) was the first film to show a black man kill a white man--two white cops, in fact--and get away with it. Rejected by the Hollywood...
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Pae White: UCLA Hammer Museum
Of all the objets that thus far make up the baroque oeuvre of Pae White--from the zodiac-themed origami clocks to the castiron barbecues in the shape of owls and turtles; from the glazed ceramic bricks to the spider-assisted web drawings; from the...
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Paul Etienne Lincoln: Alexander and Bonin
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Looking at Paul Etienne Lincoln's outlandish gadgets, one gets the impression of the artist as gentleman tinkerer: Think of his Equestrian Opulator [c], 1990-2000, a standing aluminum telescope that can peel an orange and...
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Peter Louis-Jensen: Vestsjaellands Kunstmuseum
The avant-garde project of total integration of art and society eventually leads out of art. Peter Louis-Jensen (1941-99) was among those who took this route, although he made more stops along the way than most. He pioneered Minimalism and a kind of...
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Pipilotti Rist: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
For her West Coast solo museum debut, Swiss video and installation artist Pipilotti Rist showed three works, including a brand-new one cocommissioned by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Luxembourg's Musee d'Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean. Together...
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Raoul De Keyser: Whitechapel Art Gallery, London
Why has Raoul De Keyser's art assumed international prominence in the last decade? Not only is he the wrong age--over sixty when his work finally began to filter out over the Belgian border in the early '90s, now in his seventies for his first retrospective,...
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"Ready to Shoot": Kunsthalle Dusseldorf
A furrow is being plowed in the sand, first parallel to the left edge of the film screen, then to the right, bottom, and top edges, until the picture frame appears doubled by the quadratic line on the beach. Jan Dibbets's 16 mm 12 Hours Tide Object...
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Remote Control: Abigail Solomon-Godeau's Dispatches from the Image Wars
LIKE A MINIATURE GUILLOTINE, a camera shutter slices an image from the world into which it may or may not be subsequently launched. But if it is launched--printed, transmitted, broadcast, or reproduced--it may function as an event in its own right....
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Robert Overby: Luckman Gallery
In 1969, after more than a decade of commercial design work, Robert Overby decided to become a full-time artist. The oft-cited turning point was an assignment to procure an art collection for the corporate offices of CBS. Working with a relatively...
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Robyn O'Neil: Bodybuilder and Sportsman
In fifteen works on paper, Robyn O'Neil depicts a snowy, isolated, mountainous spot seemingly hospitable only to fir trees and robust bearded men. In this alpinelike setting. O'Neil finds a rich backdrop for life's starker passages, a place curiously...
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Shabby Clique
LAST SUMMER LUCY AND JORGE ORTA INVITED ME TO VISIT THEIR dairy farm on the outskirts of Paris, and in that oddly bucolic old-world environment I started catching up on a backlog of reading, including the inaugural issue of Continuous Project (by Bettina...
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Shellburne Thurber: Participant, Inc
As practices, art and psychoanalysis have a few things in common. Both build from and depend on histories (often hidden); both understand images to be powerful and full of elusive meaning. Psychoanalysis, of course, is also a methodology for reading...
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Siemon Allen/Dominic McGill: Fusebox Gallery
Clearly inspired by events in the Middle East, the works by Dominic McGill and Siemon Allen that make up the recent show "Pop Agenda" use a pop-cultural idiom to offer a glimpse of how political, economic, and social issues get transformed as they...
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"Son et Lumiere": Mit List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, MA
"SON ET LUMIERE" MIT LIST VISUAL ARTS CENTER, CAMBRIDGE, MA By now, sound and projected light commonly fill art galleries with a stroboscopic din and flash. It's rare, however, that an exhibition self-consciously interrogates the terms of these...
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Specific Objections: Yve-Alain Bois on Donald Judd in London and Minimalism in New York and Los Angeles
I AM NOT SURE DONALD JUDD WOULD HAVE LAUGHED--HIS CLOSE CIRCLE might know better, but he never struck me in deed or word as having much of a sense of humor. Yet John Waters's poster Visit Marfa, 2003, like all his other satirical endeavors, is pitch-perfect...
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Taft Green
Despite the tone of ambivalence that haunts Tony Smith's famous account of driving at night on a then-unfinished section of the New Jersey Turnpike, its citation in Michael Fried's "Art and Objecthood" (1967) serves a strict rhetorical purpose. Fried...
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Terry Allen: LA Louver/Santa Monica Museum of Art
How did Los Angeles come to host what amounted to a Terry Allen festival? The Lubbock-raised, LA-schooled, and Santa Fe-based visual artist, musician, and writer was the subject of simultaneous solo exhibitions at LA Louver and the Santa Monica Museum...
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Three Times a Lady: Peter Plagens on the Whitney's New Curators
IS THE WHITNEY remaking itself--again? When Tom Armstrong left in 1990 after seventeen years at the helm and David A. Ross took over as director, the museum supposedly jettisoned its predilection for artists from blue-chip SoHo galleries in favor of...
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Truls Melin: Galleri Lars Bohman
At lunch with Truls Melin the week his new exhibition opened, we talked about his seven months in a mental institution, how he got there, and the exhibitions he has made since. This was his twelfth. The figurines were in his familiar ingenuous style;...
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Valerie Jouve: Musee d'Art Contemporain
Valerie Jouve's Synopsis d'un territoire (Synopsis of a Territory), 2003, could be described as the story of the Val-de-Marne, an administrative departement southeast of Paris. Or as the story of a public commission for twelve or fifteen photographs...
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Wear and Care: Ann Temkin Charts the Complicated Terrain Surrounding the Preservation of Donald Judd's Work
THE PEOPLE CLOSE TO DONALD JUDD'S WORK HAVE LONG BEEN AWARE that its apparent sturdiness belies a great vulnerability. In fact, the issue of care and repair constituted an ongoing source of vexation for Judd. In his "Complaints: Part II," published...
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Wim Delvoye: Centro per l'Arte Contemporanea Luigi Pecci
Judging from his retrospective exhibition--the first of a new series at the Centro Pecci, now directed by Daniel Soutif--the lure of the scatological has gained the upper hand in Wim Delvoye's recent work. Yes, the show also contained works from the...
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