Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 9, May

1000 Words: Matthew Barney Talks about De Lama Lamina, 2004
Anyone who knows (and who doesn't?) Matthew Barney's recently concluded Cremaster cycle, with its baroque symbolic systems and rituals of performance, should be at least partially primed for De Lama Lamina (From Mud, a Blade), a collaboration between...
Alex Bag: Elizabeth Dee Gallery
Alex Bag's "Coven Services for Consumer Mesmerism, Product Sorcery, and the Necromantic Reimagination of Consumption" uses low-budget materials and DIY processes to transform the gallery into the corporate HQ of a sinister, world-dominating advertising...
Amelie Von Wulffen: Greene Naftali
It's been argued that thirty-eight-year-old Berlin-based artist Amelie von Wulffen is working in something like a "new German Romantic" vein, and, in her first solo show in New York, any number of her photo-and-paint collages hinted at an urge to recycle...
Anne Truitt: Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University
The American artist Anne Truitt, who was included in "Black, White and Gray" (1964), "Primary Structures" (1966), and other exhibitions that helped define Minimalism, is best known for her pillar-like wooden structures, which she continues making to...
Artful Mind: Svetlana Alpers on Richard Wollheim
RICHARD WOLLHEIM, who died on November 4, 2003, at the age of eighty, was one of the leading philosophers writing on art and on the mind in the twentieth century. Art and Its Objects (1968, expanded 1980), On Art and the Mind (1974), Painting as an...
Barbara Kruger: Mary Boone Gallery
Not for the first time, Barbara Kruger deals in her latest work with pressure, animosity, stress. Twelve, 2004, is a video installation in which images of the individuals in a dozen successive friend and family groups sitting around tables are projected...
Basque to the Future: Martin Herbert on Manifesta 5
FOR ITS FIFTH EDITION, THE MOST NOMADIC of European art expos will materialize from June II to September 30 in Spain's Basque country, distributing some fifty artists' works through six venues in two neighboring cities--the tourist hub of Donostia-San...
Bernd and Hilla Becher: K21-Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dusseldorf
I've seen Bernd and Hilla Becher's black-and-white photographs of industrial structures innumerable times, but never quite like this: picture after picture, nearly 650 in all, showing buildings--water towers, grain elevators, coal bunkers, winding...
Bill Morrison: Maya Stendhal Gallery
In A Voyage on the North Sea, Rosalind Krauss recalls that in the late '60s and early '70s artists including Richard Serra and Robert Smithson made a habit of visiting Anthology Film Archives, where they absorbed the canon of modernist film up to and...
Carnegie Haul: Scott Rothkopf Interviews Laura Hoptman, Curator of the 2004 Carnegie International
SCOTT ROTHKOPF: Given that there's been no advance word on your show, would you begin by telling us how it will differ from previous Internationals? LAURA HOPTMAN: Unlike the past three Internationals, which used a broad survey format, the 2004...
Childe's Play
The nineteenth-century novelist William Dean Howells identified an abiding concern in American literature for the "more smiling aspects of life." A similar interest can be found in the Impressionist paintings of American Childe Hassam (1859-1935)....
Chris Hanson and Hendrika Sonnenberg: Cohan and Leslie
Systems of social activity and interpersonal communication and the breakdowns that plague them provided the organizing principles for the recent exhibition by the New York-based artist team of Chris Hanson and Hendrika Sonnenberg. Profuse and appealingly...
City of Angles: Gary Indiana on Los Angeles Plays Itself
THOM ANDERSEN'S film essay Los Angeles Plays Itself--which opens in New York, at Film Forum, in July--would seem to confirm a view that many of us who've lived all or part of our lives in Los Angeles have held as a matter of course: to wit, that LA's...
Claire Cowie: James Harris Gallery
Though Claire Cowie trained as a printmaker, she's best known for the figurine-style sculptures she assembles out of doll parts and animal knickknacks and then casts in resin. As much homely mutant hybrid as sweet keepsake, the figures, which are painted...
Continental Schrift: The Story of Interfunktionen
"Who's this fascist who thinks he's an antifascist?" With these words, as Benjamin H.D. Buchloh recalls, Marcel Broodthaers voiced his outrage at Anselm Kiefer's "Occupations" series, featured in the 1975 issue of the German art magazine Interfunktionen....
Deviation Standard: Jeffrey Kastner on SITE Santa Fe
"DISPARITIES AND DEFORMATIONS: OUR Grotesque"--the evocative title selected by Robert Storr for SITE Santa Fe's Fifth International Biennial--might at first glance suggest a curatorial riposte to the previous installment of the New Mexico institution's...
"Die Universitat Ist eine Fabrik": Kunstraum der Universitat Luneburg
The opening at the new Kunstraum of the Universitat Luneburg was unwontedly overcrowded. Maybe it was because this small, very rigorously conceived exhibition was curated by Roger M. Buergel, the freshly nominated curator of Documenta 12. Only now...
Different Strokes: Linda Nochlin on "Turner, Whistler, Monet"
WITH ITS AMBITIOUS "TURNER, WHISTLER, Monet: Impressionist Visions" opening next month, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, in conjunction with the Reunion des Musees Nationaux and Tate Britain, joins recent curatorial attempts to reshuffle the deck...
Editor's Letter
"THE TV BABY SHOT ME," GROANS MATT DILLON'S WOUNDED character at the end of Gus Van Sant's Drugstore Cowboy. I thought of this line while walking through the 2004 Whitney Biennial, the words brought to mind by the severe air of unreality to which the...
Elemental Logic: Daniel Herman on Yves Klein's Air Architecture
YVES KLEIN'S ARCHITECTURE is ignored in most discussions of his work, which tend to dwell on his deep blue monochromes and his daredevil photomontage Leap into the Void, 1960. But a broader view shows that, before his life was cut short at the age...
Eva Rothschild: Kunsthalle Zurich
There has been a renewed emphasis on object making among younger artists, and Eva Rothschild's exhibition was a virtuoso demonstration of their broad, no-holds-barred reinterpretation of sculpture. Employing walls, floor, and ceiling without recourse...
Fashion Victims
I have always viewed the magazine fashion story as an important and innovative contemporary genre. If movies are akin to novels, then the fashion story is like a piece of short fiction. It is a modest improvised scenario, created by a quickly gathered...
Franz Gertsch: Gagosian Gallery, New York
In 1977, after the albums Horses and Radio Ethiopia but before Easter and Wave, Patti Smith came to Cologne to perform at the adventurous Galerie Veith Turske. Franz Gertsch was a forty-seven-year-old Photorealist painter then. Like many fans before...
Gustav Klutsis and Valentina Kulagina: International Center of Photography, New York
Through the course of the Bolshevik 1920s and Stalinist 1930s, the pioneering Soviet photomonteurs Gustav Klutsis and Valentina Kulagina produced some of the most terrible--in the old-fashioned sense of the word--examples of visual propaganda ever...
Harrell Fletcher: New Langton Arts/Jack Hanley Gallery
Harrell Fletcher's appealing brand of community-based art may rely on the people, but the tone is more block party than party line; material and message seem to be ungrudgingly provided by the wide range of "ordinary" publics--schoolchildren, church...
Heat Seeker: Jeff Gibson on the Biennale of Sydney
Descartes was wrong: The mind/body split is bogus. With this as her hook for the 14th Biennale of Sydney, the director, Portuguese independent curator Isabel Carlos, won't get much argument there. Titing her show "On Reason and Emotion." Carlos has...
Hermann Nitsch: Mike Weiss Gallery
There are many paths to ecstasy. Some, pace Blake, lead down the road of excess, while others go the way of asceticism. The relationship between heightened states of mind and the process of artmaking has always been close, with the construction of...
Hirsch Perlman: Blum & Poe
Hirsch Perlman's black-and-white shots of crude, robotlike figures fashioned from cardboard and propped and piled in an empty bedroom debuted at this gallery in 2001. His second Los Angeles show follows up with four new groups of prints, also black-and-white:...
In Concert: Alan Gilbert on Ultra-Red
SINCE AMBIENT MUSIC'S origins in the '70s, its creators have felt compelled to distinguish it from Muzak or aural wallpaper. Ambient godfather Brian Eno, for one, conveyed this very anxiety in the liner notes for his 1978 release Music for Airports,...
In Conversation: Dan Graham & Michael Smith
If one story of art during the 1990s was the ever-increasing awareness of its relationship to entertainment--and a corollary interest in social and participatory models of artmaking--then a compelling shadow figure in this narrative is Michael Smith,...
Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller: Luhring Augustine
Someone is being followed; someone is not telling the whole truth; footsteps crunch on gravel; the view careers along a lonely pedestrian underpass or through dark trees; an urgent whisper startles in one's ear. Shots ring out. Somewhere the narrative...
John Duff: Knoedler & Co
The works in New York-based artist John Duff's recent exhibition "Designed with You in Mind: Various Sculptures, Variously Entailed" are constructed according to the basic principles of geometry. Inclined Form, 2001, is a plaster tetrahedron whose...
Josephine Pryde: Cubitt Gallery
It is so easy to be carried along by the preferences of the moment, to take decisions on the basis of common knowledge, cliche, and trite assumption. If Josephine Pryde's photographs appear reticent, even gnomic, it is due in large part to her dislike...
Kirsten Pieroth: Klosterfelde/Portikus
In her recent works, the young Berlin-based artist Kirsten Pieroth is concerned with invention--in particular, with the most famous inventor of them all, Thomas Alva Edison. The long title of Pieroth's Berlin exhibition, "I regret that a previous engagement...
Lara Favaretto
In the first volume of her Notebooks, Simone Weil argues that there is no such thing as collective thought but rather only that of the individual thinker. Disagreeing with this proposition, I have been happy to see it contested in the initiatives of...
Lee Lozano: P. S. 1 Contemporary Art Center
Whenever one comes across Lee Lozano's work (and the opportunities are few and far between), it's immediately apparent that this artist is an important "missing link" within the complex overlays and undercurrents of the many art practices and attitudes...
Liisa Lounila: Wilkinson Gallery
At those moments when you're washed up at a party, at a bar, at some social scene where you know absolutely no one and everyone else seems too at home to notice this stray figure, yourself, against a wall, your choices are to be miserable, leave, or...
Manfred Pernice: Anton Kern Gallery / Storefront for Art and Architecture
In Berlin-based artist Manfred Pernice's recent show, art disentangled itself from, and then remerged with, modular furniture: Dinged plywood benches each formed of three open cubes and positioned against a gallery wall led into more elaborate "banks"...
Many Happy Returns
When the Whitney Museum of American Art's 2004 Biennial, organized by Chrissie Iles, Shamim M. Momin, and Debra Singer, opened in mid-March, Artforum asked four of its regular contributors--JACK BANKOWSKY, DAVID JOSELIT, PAMELA M. LEE, SCOTT ROTHKOPF--to...
Mark Wallinger: Anthony Reynolds Gallery
Writing in Artforum on the 49th Venice Biennale, Benjamin H.D. Buchloh dismissed Mark Wallinger's work as a clear-cut instance of spectacle culture usurping art's previously oppositional spaces: Regurgitating "retardataire humanist, if not outright...
Maurizio Cannavacciuolo: Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Neapolitan artist Maurizio Cannavacciuolo is known for his puzzlelike paintings and wall drawings that densely intertwine decorative patterns, sketches of architectural elements, and images of humans and animals. A recent participant in the Isabella...
Mindy Shapero: Anna Helwing Gallery
Mindy Shapero's image-objects would seem to fit snugly into a West Coast tradition that stretches from John McCracken to Liz Larner; but Shapero, though a recent alumna of the USC graduate program, is a recent transplant from New York, and on closer...
Miranda July
Los Angeles--based artist, writer, and performer Miranda July is currently making a feature film set for release next year. Her multimedia project Learning to Love You More is included in the 2004 Whitney Biennial and is ongoing at learningtoloveyoumore.com....
Miroslaw Balka: Galleria Raffaella Cortese
Miroslaw Balka's exhibition was titled "Element der Exaktheit" (Element of Exactitude), and the aspiration to an unattainable exactitude is precisely what unified the various works: Their titles referred to their precise measurements in centimeters,...
Modern Style: Dressing Down; Abigail Solomon-Godeau
Fashion photography has been on the museum circuit for years, but the phenomenon moved center stage last month when the Museum of Modern Art premiered "Fashioning Fiction," its first take on the subject. In advance of the exhibition's opening, Artforum...
Monika Nystrom: Goteborgs Konsthall
Monika Nystrom's work concerns vision and the power of light. Her recent show "Skymning" (Twilight) took place during the darkest time of the northern year, but no artificial lighting was used in the galleries. "Twilight" used a range of elements--photographs,...
Never Mind the Sex Pistols: Theresa Duncan on Game Boy Music
IF PUNK ROCK DIED when the first kid said, "Punk's not dead!" then reports of the genre's vitality would appear to be greatly exaggerated. Everyone from pop star Avril Lavigne to Nike CEO Phil Knight has recently avowed the living influence of punk...
"Notes on Renewed Appropriationisms": The Project
Using references when the premise is to eliminate them, is like filling a slot instead of creating new channels Formulating an external structure of support is to lose a great deal of strength --Sturtevant, 1978 Fact: I once sat on a panel with...
Oh, Jackie: Amy Taubin on Superstar in a Housedress
JACKIE CURTIS made brilliant entrances, and although he sometimes overstayed his welcome, his final exit, in 1985 at age thirty-eight, came much too soon. Heroin, to paraphrase Lou Reed, was the death of him. Craig Highberger's documentary portrait,...
"Other Alternatives": Marco-Museo De Arte Contemporanea
Subtitled "New Visual Experiences in Portugal" and gathering works by twenty Portuguese artists under the age of thirty-five, this exhibition confirmed the vitality of the Portuguese artistic scene. It took place in Galicia, a border region with close...
Ouattara Watts: Magazzino d'Arte Moderna
There are still artists who believe strongly in painting, in its language, in its ability to create imaginative worlds. One such is Ouattara Watts, born in Ivory Coast and now living and working in New York. His work undoubtedly brings to mind the...
Peter Saul: George Adams Gallery
"Suburbia," an exhibition of Peter Saul's paintings and drawings from the mid-to late '60s, offers a look at the artist not only as scathing ironist but as maverick aesthete. Shocking pink and blazing complementaries jump from the works' surfaces,...
Sharon Core: Bell Wether
Photography has long been the helpmate of painting. Thomas Eakins secretly painted from photographs; Richter and Warhol transformed the practice for the second half of the twentieth century. But could the tide be shifting? For her photographic series...
Shintaro Miyake: Galleria Suzy Shammah
Imagine a street in the center of Milan in winter--narrow, with neoclassical architecture, full of traffic, and crossed back and forth by a barefoot human figure with an enormous bull's head. The figure suddenly drags out of a gallery a large red stuffed...
Thomas Hirschhorn: Galerie Chantal Crousel
The ancient Egyptians entombed their pharaohs in rooms filled with the worldly possessions of the deceased. Thomas Hirschhorn's Chalet Lost History, 2003, is also brimming with objects, including a massive sarcophagus. But who is buried there and why?...
"Tokyo Girls Bravo": Marianne Boesky Gallery
Childhood is no longer what it was in the days of Rousseau and Wordsworth: It's lost its innocence. Especially in Japan--at least as it emerges in "Tokyo Girls Bravo," a gathering of work by ten mostly under-thirty artists curated by Takashi Murakami...
Verne Dawson: Galerie Eva Presenhuber
It's always fascinating to see how freely today's painting deals with stories, including its own. Take, for example, Verne Dawson's exhibition, in which various modes of painting combine to evoke a complex, inward-looking worldview, replete with layers...
Willie Doherty: Alexander and Bonin
"You think you know me. I am unknowable." The male voice is measured, calm, and somber. "I am invisible. I disappear in a crowd." Pausing between lines, the speaker allows a few seconds for each statement to sink in before proceeding to the next. "I...