Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 43, No. 3, November

Alice Shaw: Gallery 16
Whether by accident or some grand universal design, the invention of photography and the inception of psychology took place more or less simultaneously. According to Alice Shaw, the two have always had much in common as ways to see through new eyes....
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Allan McCollum: Friedrich Petzel Gallery
Allan McCollum once asserted that a typical viewer's relationship to a work of art is predicated on the desire "to be in on things at the source, to be involved in the Primal Scene, not out in the hall looking through the keyhole." It is, however,...
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Amedeo Modigliani: The Jewish Museum
After decades of revisionist art history, with its accompanying tendency to downplay the significance of biography, it's hard to believe that the oeuvre of Amedeo Modigliani remains colored by accounts of personal tragedy. Perhaps the most famous of...
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Andrea Loefke: PH Gallery
An adept young bricoleur with a light touch and a flair for playroom fantasy, Andrea Loefke made her first New York solo show a candy-colored zone of purposefully preadolescent ebullience. Her modest set-piece arrangements--featuring tiny barnyard...
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An-My Le: Murray Guy
War photographers have to a certain extent always staged their shots. Even the earliest known examples of the genre were contrived; American Civil War lensmen like Matthew Brady and Alexander Gardner weren't above scattering a few cannonballs or moving...
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"Beyond Geometry: Experiments in Form, 1940s-70s"; Los Angeles County Museum of Art
I have no doubt that Lynn Zelevansky's "Beyond Geometry" began as a labor of love, because blurred but still visible in the midst of this desultory extravaganza there is a smaller, more original exhibition trying to get out. This embedded exhibition...
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Bob Mizer: Western Project
I'd love to know exactly what was in the heads of model Ray Robirds and photographer Bob Mizer during the shoot in which Robirds, his right arm slung around a burro's neck, sports nothing but a sombrero, striped briefs, and fancy cowboy boots. Robirds...
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Candida Hofer: Volkerkundemuseum
"Eingelagerte Welten" (Worlds in Storage) was the title of this exhibition, consisting mainly of Candida Hofer's photographs of ethnological collections across Europe and in New York. Sited in an enchanting park, just steps from the financial center...
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Carsten Holler: Musee d'Art Contemporain, Marseille
Carsten Holler has come up with a novel approach: more of the same. For his current exhibition at MAC, Holler has simply duplicated a selection of his own works from the last decade, from Moving Image, 1994-2004, to Hotel Room, 2004, and placed both...
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Christiane Lohr: Studio Stefania Miscetti
For a contemporary artist, working with natural materials can represent an approach to our mythic mother, the earth, but also an investigation of structural laws, the search for an order underlying the apparent disorder of nature. To put Christiane...
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Chris Verene: Contemporary Art Center
Raised and educated in Atlanta, Chris Verene found his voice in the late 1980s on the city's bohemian gender-bending scene. Verene exhibited photographs and appeared in other guises; as a drummer with the Rock*A*Teens and a drag performance artist....
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Daniel Joseph Martinez: The Project
Daniel Joseph Martinez's installation The House America Built, 2004, is spare, quick, and tightly focused. It consists of one oversize, custom-built shack--big enough to house you or me--wedged into the gallery to look as if it had landed there by...
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Dan Peterman: Museum of Contemporary Art
Dan Peterman was engaged in the practice of "adaptive reuse" long before the term came into vogue. Distinct from recycling, reprocessing, and rehabbing, adaptive reuse doesn't run materials through the consumer mill again. Instead, like the artistic...
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David Casini: T293
The point of departure for this exhibition by David Casini, a Tuscan artist who lives in Geneva, was an untitled pair of portraits from 2003--one of John Calvin, the other of Guillaume Farel. Images of these two religious reformers stood out against...
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Elaine Reichek: Nicole Klagsbrun
Writing in the 1880s, William Morris lamented that what he called the intellectual arts had been separated by "the sharpest lines of demarcation" from the decorative arts, and he exhorted craftsmen to create a "noble, popular art" guided by nature...
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Fazal Sheikh: Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson
Most photographs take us back in time. Much rarer are those that follow us into the present with a seeming life of their own. The photos in Fazal Sheikh's series "A Camel for the Son," 1992-2000, and "The Victor Weeps," 1996-98, are among the latter....
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Folkert De Jong: Upstream Gallery
Folkert de Jong makes anti-monuments out of Styrofoam--transitory tableaux for a culture in which the permanence and eternal values symbolized by bronze or marble are all too obviously lies. Not that de Jong is averse to using apparently anachronistic...
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Fred Wilson: Studio Museum in Harlem
Already in the early '90s, certain critics were balking at Fred Wilson's museum interventions and his peculiar brand of materialist historicism, levying charges that the artist's finger-pointing politics were not only too overt but, worse still, passe....
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Hussein Chalayan: Proje4l Istanbul Museum of Contemporary Art
At the start of Hussein Chalayan's video installation place to passage, 2003, a small, futuristic vehicle zips down the ramp of a deserted London underground parking garage, hovering just above the pavement. The vehicle's sole occupant is a thin, lithe...
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"Inverted Utopias": Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Exhibitious of Latin American art in Europe and the United States have long labored under the apparent necessity of introducing or explaining an entire continent's artistic production to a public hitherto unaware of it. Surveys have inevitably been...
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Jacci Den Hartog: Christopher Grimes Gallery
Jacci Den Hartog has made a career of exploring rocks and water both as substance and subject. She investigates materials, processes, and stylistic devices for modeling them and examining the shapes they impose on one another. Isolated from broader...
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Jacques Henri Lartigue: Hayward Gallery
"France's foremost amateur photographer" was what one rather perceptive magazine journalist called Jacques Henri Lartigue in 1952, in an article revealing to an unsuspecting public "the secret passion of a painter." It was only in the following years...
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Jared Domicio: Centro Cultural Sao Paulo
Centro Cultural Sao Paulo is the municipal cultural center of Brazil's (and Latin America's) richest city, a metropolis whose budget is the third largest in the country after those of the federal government and the state of Sao Paulo. In contrast to...
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Jason Rhoades: Hauser & Wirth Collection
Jason Rhoades's installation My Madinah. In pursuit of my ermitage ..., 2004, was the final exhibition to take place in the spaces of the Hauser & Wirth Collection at the Roundhouse. Specially conceived by Rhoades for the idiosyncratic architecture...
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Javier Codesal: Galeria Estrany-De la Mota
A pioneer in the use of video in Spanish art, Javier Codesal could be considered a multimedia artist but for the dubious connotations that term has acquired. He is a creator who uses words and images with the same degree of intensity, without differentiating...
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Jonah Freeman: Andrew Kreps Gallery
The Franklin Abraham, 2004--the creepy, darkly satirical video that was the centerpiece of Jonah Freeman's recent show--is set in an indeterminate "parallel present" and concerns a building that is two miles long and houses two million people. A sort...
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Karel Funk: 303 Gallery
The great recycling bin in which art history, critical theory, and market analysis dispose of their castoffs is crawling with post-ironic ironists scavenging for material not yet reworked. And as anyone who has browsed for high-end vintage clothing...
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Mike Nelson: Modern Art Oxford
An artistic homage is by no means a straightforward gesture--it can be an act of cannibalism or one-upmanship as much as of indebtedness or respect. Like the cartoon snake that swallows some distinctively shaped object and distends into the same form,...
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Mungo Thomson: Margo Leavin Gallery
In his third solo show at Margo Leavin Gallery, Mungo Thomson extended a practice based on the double-take. He encouraged us to look again at familiar types and styles of images and their intertwined manifestations in mainstream and alternative culture;...
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Phoebe Washburn: LFL Gallery
Phoebe Washburn's undulating, room-sized sculptural installation. Nothing's Cutie, 2004, looks at first like a colorful topographic model of a densely populated futuristic urban metropolis plunked down on a desert island: Rio meets Las Vegas meets...
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Rachel Harrison: Greene Naftali Gallery
Unlike Rachel Harrison's previous exhibitions, this one didn't evade the fact that it was a showroom full of sculptures, autonomous things, standing there in plain view, whether openly embarrassed or glamorously opaque about their status as aesthetic...
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Richard Deacon: Marian Goodman Gallery
There's a kind of sculpture that makes some people feel like wusses--an art of resistant materials, mighty force, dangerous tools--but there's always an audience for it, because it makes other people feel like titans. Of course that's not the only...
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Richard Long: Sperone Westwater
Richard Long brings to his gallery installations something of the severity, suppleness, and mystery of the wilderness that is the setting for the large-scale projects for which he is better known. His recent works on plywood, which function both as...
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Robert Ryman: Peter Blum
Robert Ryman was still in his late twenties and early thirties and not quite set in his ways when from 1957 to 1964 he made the twenty-seven works on paper exhibited here. Nevertheless, the now all-too-familiar square format is already in place, and...
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Speaking Volumes: Rachel Withers on the Art of Susan Hiller
The following article obeys two rules likely to make aficionados of Susan Hiller's work smile wryly. One: The writer will tell the truth. Two: She will not use any first-person pronouns. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Readers not thoroughly familiar...
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Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler: Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria
For costuming, see Matthew Barney; for sound, Janet Cardiff; for art direction, Gregory Crewdson. Over the past ten years the art world has witnessed the incremental reinvention of the cinematic wheel, one department at a time, via the movie-besotted...
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Vaclav Pozarek: Kunstmuseum Winterthur
A cloak of silence has fallen on sculpture. While the discourse on painting periodically delves into the disappearance or new guises of a given genre, autonomous sculpture seems to have long since disappeared. Three-dimensional developments have been...
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Viewfinder: Harun Farocki's Recently Completed Eye/Machine Trilogy Made Its Debut Last Month at the 54th Carnegie International in Pittsburgh. Artforum Editor Tim Griffin Caught Up with the Filmmaker on Opening Day in the Carnegie Museum's Garden, Where He Mused on Smart Weapons, Cinema, and CNN
TIM GRIFFIN: How would you say the second Gulf War has changed the imaging of war? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] HARUN FAROCKI: In the first Gulf War, we all believed in "smart" weapons--meaning a weapon that can detect its...
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Vision Quest: The Cinema of Harun Farocki
Born in 1944 to an Indian father and a German mother, Harun Farocki studied at the German Film and Television Academy in Berlin from 1966 to 1968. This places him in the ambit of the most famous figures of New German Cinema (Fassbinder, Herzog, and...
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Wayne Gonzales: Galerie Almine Rech
I can still remember Wayne Gonzales's series of paintings constructed around the figure of Lee Harvey Oswald and the Kennedy assassination, shown in 2001 at the Paula Cooper Gallery and at the Consortium of Dijon. Of particular note was the juxtaposition...
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