Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 43, No. 2, October

Army of One
FOR ME, WITH WARHOL, IT WAS NEVER REALLY ABOUT paintings or films or other artworks. It was always about him, his hair, his look. And it was about the fact that you can't really divide his work by media or style: He had developed a system, or perhaps...
Read preview Overview
Biz Kid
I WORKED AT ANDY WARHOL ENTERPRISES FOR A LITTLE more than a year, from late '79 to early '81, a period when the Factory was located at Broadway and Seventeenth Street. Getting hired there was a stroke of good luck for a kid from Wisconsin (even if...
Read preview Overview
Black to Front: Michael Lobel on Robert Colescott
Robert Colescott's Interior I, 1991, is a spot-on pastiche of one of Roy Lichtenstein's "Interiors" paintings: Here are the sterile modern furnishings, the stark outlines, the repeating dot patterns. Yet someone has shuffled in to disturb the otherwise...
Read preview Overview
Cheers for Fears
WARHOL CHEERS ME UP ABOUT GETTING BAD REVIEWS. Lousy press didn't stop him, so he's my role model for the shatupon artist who bucks up (despite harsh criticism) and continues to produce. Being unlikable was his endeavor's foundation. Warhol cheers...
Read preview Overview
Dandy Warhol
IN THE EARLY '80S, THERE WERE PROBABLY A HALF DOZEN artists, all of them very different from one another, who claimed a relationship to Warhol. I thought my work had something to do with Warhol, but so did Julian Schnabel. Warhol was one of the first...
Read preview Overview
Depth and Dying
I'M HANGING ON TO SOME ADOLESCENT SENSE OF LOYALTY, like a good fan. Perpetual fandom--that's my sense of the Warhol legacy. Personally I find myself situated uneasily between making cartoons and having serious concerns--desirous of a high-level conversation...
Read preview Overview
Destroy All Monsters: Jan Tumlir on Motor City Madness
Motown, the Detroit-based musical empire built by Berry Gordy in imitation of the local auto works that had once employed him, was a brazen purveyor of (to borrow Theodor Adorno's dismissive epithet) "commodity music," pure pop product built from standardized...
Read preview Overview
Empire State
EIGHT HOURS AND FIVE MINUTES IS A LONG TIME TO SPEND watching a movie. That's how long Empire is. I made it through six hours once on my birthday. I knew Warhol didn't really expect this of me, but I wanted to see what it was like, to treat his film...
Read preview Overview
Garden Party
I SEE THE FACTORY AS A GARDEN, A KIND OF ORGANISM from which ideas grow. A field of connections and relations that functioned as a brain for Warhol. It's obvious, in a way, that when you put people together you create friction. The Factory was a place...
Read preview Overview
Ground Control
I HAD NOT YET TAKEN MY FIRST PICTURE WHEN A STRANGE, low-flying object glided ominously over my family's suburban house. I was in my front yard trying to figure out which plant or shrub or pet to immortalize when the object, a large, bright yellow,...
Read preview Overview
Guns and Poses
I CAME TO NEW YORK CITY IN 1974. IN NEW YORK CITY IN 1974 Andy Warhol was the fastest gun in town. In 1990 I wrote on a painting, ANDY WARHOL WAS A FUCKING ASSHOLE AND SO WERE ALL HIS FUCKHEAD FRIENDS AND I'M GLAD HE DIED. When I wrote it I was thinking...
Read preview Overview
Hey Joe
JON VOIGHT IS WALKING ACROSS PARK AVENUE. "HEY JOE," someone says, kind of low, like Jimi Hendrix, but shy, too--"Hey Joe Buck." Jon Voight, who is Joe Buck, is slouching toward a voice. The voice, which is lyrical, has come from the streetlights and...
Read preview Overview
High & Low: Graham Bader on Soft-Core
October 7 isn't just the day, in 1990, that the long-awaited exhibition "High & Low: Modern Art and Popular Culture" opened at the Museum of Modern Art; it is also the date, one year earlier, that the US Congress finally resolved to keep the really...
Read preview Overview
Howard Singerman on Pop Noir
Pop artists took a professional interest in products and packaging in the '60s: Commercial design offered not only new source material--Campbell's Soup labels or Brillo boxes--but the model for a whole new way of doing business. Across the decade,...
Read preview Overview
Image Building
Pop is readily associated with art, music, and fashion, less so with architecture; yet it was bound up with architectural debates from first to last. The very idea of Pop was floated in the early 1950s by the Independent Group (IG) in London, a motley...
Read preview Overview
Infotainment: Thomas Lawson on Media Moguls
When Artforum called to propose looking back at "Infotainment," a 1985 touring exhibition of young, media-smart East Village artists, I had just returned from London, where I saw Tate Britain's "Art and the 60s: This Was Tomorrow." As I thought back...
Read preview Overview
Just Pathetic: Michael Wilson on Sore Winners
In the '90s stretch of a time line featured in the handy primer Art Since 1960, the steady march of minimovements--YBA, "art post-medium," "live art," "context art"--is rudely interrupted by an upstart newcomer, "abject/slacker art." As the volume's...
Read preview Overview
Love and Work
I LOVE ANDY WARHOL, AND I LOVE ANDY WARHOL'S WORK. I love Andy Warhol with a love that is exclusionist and egoistic. It is not respect or admiration that I have for Warhol and his work, it is love. Andy Warhol and Joseph Beuys were my professors, even...
Read preview Overview
On the Level
THE FIRST TIME I EVER SAW A WARHOL WAS ABOUT TWENTY-five years ago. It was at an import bookstore in Tokyo, on the cover of Interview magazine. A full ten years passed before I finally got the chance to see his work up close in galleries and museums....
Read preview Overview
Performing the Future
Pop art is a nasty bit of work. It toadies to the powers that be and plays to the peanut gallery; broadcasts our dirty secrets but never lets us in on its own. Pop art is pushy, unapologetic, expedient--and amnesiac. It glories in the way things are...
Read preview Overview
Performing the Self: Alison M. Gingeras on Martin Kippenberger
ENFANT TERRIBLE Martin Kippenberger, to lift a lyric from Elvis Presley, "was born standing up and talking back." At least that's how the legend goes. Anecdotes concerning the countless misdeeds of this enfant terrible at times nearly eclipse the...
Read preview Overview
Performing the System
Zapping its way through disparate TV shows and commercials, Daniel Pflumm's video installation Paris, 2003, pulses with a hypnotic collage of living, breathing corporate logos. In a darkened gallery, the viewer experiences a delirous, often painfully...
Read preview Overview
Pop after Pop: A Roundtable
"JEFF KOONS MAKES ME SICK." The words are Peter Schjeldahl's, and the occasion was a review in the SoHo weekly 7 Days, back in the '80s, before koons was quite the museum-certified star he is today. In the course of the write-up, Schjeldahl would turn...
Read preview Overview
Pop Art: Clement Greenberg
We do not often associate Clement Greenberg with Pop. The great champion of Abstract Expressionism never published an essay on the subject, and occasional remarks in interviews and texts in John O'Brian's indispensable anthology of the critic's writings...
Read preview Overview
Pop Life: David Rimanelli on Los Super Elegantes
The scene: downtown Los Angeles, summer 2002. Milena Muzquiz and Martiniano Lopez-Crozet, aka Los Super Elegantes, are crashing the VIP opening of the Warhol retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Lopez-Crozet has a hairdresser friend who's...
Read preview Overview
Pop since 1949: Lawrence Alloway
Marked by possibility and potentiality, complexity and contradiction, Lawrence Alloway's writing could range from the monster movie Tarantula to the aesthetics of Roger Fry--all within the space of a paragraph. Alloway began to formulate his philosophy...
Read preview Overview
Robert Rosenblum on Body Doubles
A new race of humanoids was spawned in the '60s. Think of Lichtenstein's boneless, fleshless housewives, Segal's mummified city dwellers, Wesselmann's faceless, airbrushed sex toys. But the tribe kept increasing, as witnessed not just in mutant art,...
Read preview Overview
Sampling the Globe
In a studio below my office at the Stadelschule in Frankfurt, a young German painter is scrupulously copying Japanese manga characters, while a cadre of film students in the next room watch a bootleg of a Matthew Barney movie. Pratchaya Phinthong,...
Read preview Overview
School of Pop: Thomas Crow on the Class of '57
BY THE TIME POP ART EARNED ITS CAPITAL P, the British artists, architects, and intellectuals known as the independent Group had produced a decade's worth of future-focused art and polemic. It was critic and IG spokesman Lawrence Alloway who first used...
Read preview Overview
Screen Test: Scott Rothkopf on Jeff Koons's Olive Oyl
Jeff Koons paints a picture. Well, not Jeff Koons exactly, but Jeff Koons and three teams of three assistants, working eight-hour shifts, twenty-four hours a day for more than a month. Still, Art News put it simply as "So-and-So Paints a Picture" when...
Read preview Overview
Spiritual America: David Deitcher on Pre-Teen Spirit
For twenty years I kept a rather plain postcard tucked away in a folder of art-related ephemera from the early '80s. From edge to edge on its other wise black face, white capital letters spell out a single word: "POP." On the flip side, the card provides...
Read preview Overview
Subject to Revision
Amid dozens of artworks stridently addressing the politics of identity at the infamously "PC" 1993 Whitney Biennial, Glenn Ligon's Notes on the Margin of the Black Book took a more elliptical and ambiguous approach. This elegantly conceived structural...
Read preview Overview
Superflat: Kitty Hauser on Fan Fare
Like the answered prayers of a cargo cult, a consignment of shiny robots, pneumatic girls, and celluloid explosions landed at LA MOCA'S newest satellite gallery at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood in January 2001, as if dropped from Japanese...
Read preview Overview
Tin Foiled
CHARLIE CHAPLIN AND ANDY WARHOL BOTH CONTEMPLATED the machine and came to the same conclusion: Its effects were dehumanizing. But where Chaplin issued a de facto warning about the mechanization of life in his art, Warhol fell madly in love with the...
Read preview Overview
"Transformer": Bruce Hainley on the Wild Side
"Pop After Pop" assumes that I know what "Pop" is, that I know what "Art" means. I don't. Take, for example, "Transformer": Aspekte der Travestie," curated by Jean-Christophe Ammann, which ran from mid-March to mid-April 1974 at the Kunstmuseum...
Read preview Overview
TV, or Not TV: David Frankel on Alex Bag
What is the point of like making work for people that are so smart that they don't even watch TV? --Alex Bag, Fall'95 Alex Bag is the queen of pout: Forehead forward, brows raised, chin in, lips pursed, she can deliver a look you'd get out of the...
Read preview Overview
What's Not to like? Robert Storr on Mike Kelley
Andy Warhol: "I think everybody should like everybody." Gene Swenson: "Is that what Pop Art is all about?" Andy Warhol: "Yes, it's liking things." --"What Is Pop Art?" Art News, November 1963 Go to the source. As far as Pop is concerned, that would...
Read preview Overview
Young British Art: Kate Bush on the YBA Sensation
Sixteen years separate "Freeze," the legendary 1988 Damien Hirst-curated exhibition that gave birth to Young British Art, and Tate Britain's recent "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida," a show that signaled both the phenomenon's institutional apotheosis and, for many,...
Read preview Overview