Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 43, No. 10, Summer

1000 Words: Catherine Yass Talks about Filming the West Bank Wall
Looking back, it's hard not to notice how often British artist Catherine Yass has set up her camera to face walls, capturing surfaces spotted by stains in a meat market ("Stall," 1996), scratched with graffiti in a prison ("Cell," 1998), obscured by...
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Adriane Colburn: Southern Exposure Gallery
In her recent exhibition "Before the Rush," Adriane Colburn reconstructed hidden histories through a kind of meditative cartography, focusing our attention on particular parts of the map. Colburn's title refers to the nineteenth-century Gold Rush that...
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An Eye for an Ear: Art & Music in the Twentieth Century
The dark secret of high-modernist visual art and theory has always been (shhh!) sound. No surprise, then, that the twenty-first century has already brought us two major shows devoted to the connections between eye and ear in the twentieth: "Visual...
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A River Runs through It: Daniel Birnbaum on the Ister
RIVERS HAVE no poetic power anymore, German filmmaker Hans-Jurgen Syberberg tells us in David Barison and Daniel Ross's 2004 documentary The Ister (now available on video). They have lost their mythic resonance and become part of the "machine" of "daily...
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A Text about High Desert Test Sites
GETTING LOST The best and worst part of High Desert Test Sites is getting lost in the desert. We make a map, but it's usually inaccurate. The desert is big, a magnitude larger than the city, and we can never fit its immensity on a sheet of paper...
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Ayse Erkmen: Barbara Weiss
"Possessions" simply does not do justice to the range of meanings associated with "Habseligkeiten," the title of Ayse Erkmen's latest exhibition. Nor can other common English translations--"belongings," "things," "stuff"--capture the word's rich roots:...
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Being There: Art and the Politics of Place
Three artists are interviewed by Avalanche magazine. The sessions are conducted on various occasions in December 1968 and January 1969, the results published the following year. What do they talk about? Earthworks. And because the artists are those...
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Carlos Amorales: Casa De America
"?Por que tener miedo al futuro?" (Why Fear the Future?) is the titular question that animated this exhibition. By way of an answer, Carlos Amorales transformed a collection of 428 images into simple black-and-white vectorial representations--computer-generated...
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Conversation Starter: Mel Bochner on the Republished Writings of Donald Judd
Complete Writings 1959-1975: Gallery Reviews, Book Reviews, Articles, Letters to the Editor, Reports, Statements, Complaints, by Donald Judd. Halifax: The Press of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. 229 pages. $55. WHY DONALD JUDD'S WRITINGS?...
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Damien Hirst: Gagosian Gallery
"If it wins, it wins through intimidation." This was David Rimanelli's concluding assessment of Damien Hirst's last solo exhibition in New York, also at Gagosian Gallery, published in these pages in 2000. A meticulously designed production number,...
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Dan Attoe: 404 Arte Contemporanea
In his first European solo exhibition, American artist Dan Attoe portrayed his inner life and his cultural milieu in twenty-five paintings (all works 2004). Trained in both psychology and visual art, he reveals childhood memories and dreams in small...
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David Hockney: LA Louver
David Hockney's colorful persona has long served as a foil for the quiet understatement of his pictorial output. Throughout the 1960s, these two elements--the artist and his oeuvre--were consistently misaligned. On his emergence, Hockney the artist...
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David Shrigley: Anton Kern Gallery
David Shrigley's recent work feels like the result of a personality test administered by a not entirely benevolent authority. Some of his drawings seem like innocent doodles that have bubbled up from his subconscious: a set of mindless-looking circles...
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Dean Sameshima: Peres Projects
Fagdom's Betsy Ross, Gilbert Baker, a "self-described 'flaming queen' by age three," designed the rainbow flag in 1978, but due to technical problems (an initial eight-color design could not be commercially fabricated because hot pink was at that time...
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El Diario del Fin del Mundo: A Journey That Wasn't
The extraordinary events and unlikely phenomena to which sailors bear solitary witness are not easy to record. The narrative must be precise, or it runs the risk of being taken for a fabrication. For the maritime storyteller this would be unthinkable,...
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Eric Fischl: Mary Boone Gallery
Has Eric Fischl returned to the kind of work that earned him notoriety (and the scorn of feminists) in the 1980s? The innuendo, and sometimes-explicit sexual imagery, of the six paintings that are part of his ongoing sequence of "Bedroom Scenes," immediately...
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Founding Father: Robert Lumley on the Fondazione Merz
"NO STRAIGHT LINES," says Beatrice Merz, showing me around the Fondazione Merz in Turin, a few days before its inauguration last April. Of course, she is describing her father Mario's work--the space newly devoted to its legacy is primarily rectilinear:...
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Girl, Interrupted: Johanna Burton on Tracy + the Plastics
IT WAS UNCLEAR just when the show officially started. Nikki was the first band member to arrive. While the audience got settled, she was busy alternately drinking from a teacup and attempting the apparently vexing art of getting both arms into her...
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Inside Out: Art's New Terrain
ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, a group of American artists went into the remote landscape to push beyond the conventional boundaries of both the art world and the art world and the artwork. They sought a territorial tabula rasa for their practices,...
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Jan Mancuska: Andrew Kreps Gallery
The sculptural installation in Czech artist Jan Mancuska's sophomore show at Andrew Kreps Gallery proposes that there are not only two sides to every story--there are three. Or, depending on how one counts, thirteen. True Story, 2005, consists of three...
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Jan Vercruysse: Studio Trisorio
Consistent with an artistic journey that now spans several decades, Jan Vercruysse's new series "PLACES," 2004-2005, refers back to some earlier series, particularly the "Tombeaux," 1987-94, and "M," 1992-98. The guiding images are the figures from...
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Jared Pankin: Carl Berg Gallery
Jared Pankin's practice combines sculptural precedents ranging from Baroque tableaux to post-Minimalist scatter with skills more commonly associated with set decorators, diorama builders, taxidermists, and Martha Stewart devotees. The results are quasi-narrative...
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Jeff Davis: KS Art
Sitting astride a giant, wailing, red-and-yellow severed head is a green-skinned naked man sporting an enormous erection. This supersize organ curves upward to support a cloud or platform on which is perched another head of the same size and color...
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Jerome Bel: Dance Theater Workshop
"No to spectacle no to virtuosity ... no to seduction of spectator"--Jerome Bel takes as a given the commandments of radical dance in America laid down by Yvonne Rainer in her notes for the 1965 Parts of Some Sextets. He is part of a tide of French...
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Johan Grimonprez: Palais Des Beaux-Arts
Johan Grimonprez's new project Looking for Alfred, which centers on Alfred Hitchcock, is a work in progress. What was shown at Bozar--the quasi-hip new name of the Palais des Beaux-Arts or Paleis voor Schone Kunsten, whose only redeeming feature is...
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Josephine Meckseper
New York-based artist Josephine Meckseper will be included in the Lyon Biennial of Contemporary Art, opening in September. She is currently preparing for solo shows at GAVLAK, West Palm Beach; Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York; and Spain's Museo de Arte...
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Jutta Koether: Thomas Erben Gallery
Jutta Koether is an artist who paints, but she is not exclusively a "painter." She is also a performance artist, musician, writer, and art and music critic. And while painting sometimes plays a supporting role in her performance art, in her music for...
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Katya Sander: Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien
Changes brought on by the gradual dismantling of Western Europe's welfare states are giving new urgency to questions about the function of public space and its potential uses: How are surveillance and control structured? In what ways does the hierarchical...
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Kris Martin: Sies + Hoke
I'm rarely won over to a new artist by a single work, but it happened during the recent art fair in Cologne. When I entered the Sies + Hoke booth, my gaze was unexpectedly drawn to a gold-plated steel ball, sitting like an afterthought on the carpeting...
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Larry Zox: Stephen Haller Gallery
If you're interested in modernism's effluence, you might take a look at the work of Wade Guyton, Carrie Moyer, Sam Durant, Jorge Pardo, or Milena Dragicevic. Taken as a group, these artists address both modernism's formal emphases and that quintessentially...
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Loose Canon: Matt Saunders on Jonathan Meese's Mother Parsifal
AT THE END of John Boorman's 1974 cult film Zardoz, Sean Connery and Charlotte Rampling sit in a cave and age quickly through the rest of their lives while Beethoven's Seventh Symphony booms. The cuts move with the music, so each new phrase of orchestral...
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Lucy Puls: Stephen Wirtz Gallery
Secondary markets shift constantly, and not just in the art world. The advent of eBay has altered the way we value objects that gather dust. Even Dick Cheney has seen fit to point out that a sizable number of Americans now avoid unemployment lines...
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Maja Weyermann: Galerie Vera Munro
Modernity brought a new kind of space into being, one that was historically predetermined: a unified space with inherent clarity, transparency, and logic. In this space, the order of classical geometry is as much at home as the idea of a purified architecture...
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Matthew Ronay: Andrea Rosen Gallery
Visitors who read a review before seeing Matthew Ronay's first solo exhibition at Andrea Rosen Gallery, or who had the temerity to ask questions of the gallery employees, were likely treated to some of the fantastical stories the artist invents to...
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Matthieu Laurette: Yvon Lambert
More than video, photography, or any other medium, Matthieu Laurette's favored mode of appearance is, precisely, the appearance. This tautology says a good deal about his art of endless refraction, a self-reflective oeuvre that nevertheless takes on,...
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Matts Leiderstam: Magasin 3
Matts Leiderstam's exhibition at Magasin 3 contains many levels and subsets. Grand Tour, 1996-, first presented at the Venice Biennale in 1997, provides a unified setting for many of Leiderstam's key projects and models them into one consistent body...
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Maurizio Nannucci: Galleria Fumagalli
Since his first appearance in a group show in 1964, Maurizio Nannucci has been investigating the relationship between word and vision. In 1967, he began using neon as a medium for his text-based work. Today Nannucci continues to explore the same territory,...
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Navigating the New Territory: Art, Avatars, and the Contemporary Mediascape
It's the electric whisper bleeding from earphones in subway cars, and it's the disarming experience of believing for a minute that the well-dressed guy talking to himself on the street is crazy--until you see his headset. Or it's the zombie dance,...
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Patrick Faigenbaum: Musee Du Louvre
With all due respect to the artist, the first thing that came to my mind--once the visual and emotional shock of his monumental two-part photo installation "Louvre et Chaussee d'Antin" subsided--was a one-line joke: "What's the difference between a...
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Pope & Guthrie: East Tilbury Village Hall/Plaza Cinema
"Work collectively, live individually," expounded Tomas Bata, founder of the international shoemaking empire. To that end, he housed his workers in purpose-built, functionalist-style model towns, boasting schools, sports halls, and other facilities....
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Rachel Feinstein: Marianne Boesky Gallery
The announcement for Rachel Feinstein's second solo exhibition at Marianne Boesky Gallery featured neither the artist's trademark brummagem-Baroque sculptures nor her lesser-known paintings. Rather, the oversize folded mailer reproduced a photograph...
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Remote Possibilities: A Roundtable Discussion on Land Art's Changing Terrain
TIM GRIFFIN A number of artists have recently executed high-profile projects in remote places--"remote," at least, from traditional art-world centers. In fact, we can count three individuals participating today among them: Pierre and his recent voyage...
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Rezi Van Lankveld: The Approach
For the longest time, following the example of a writer I considered nearly infallible, I thought the adjective that defined the quality inherent in clouds, rocks, and so on that permits us to see various things in them--perhaps most notoriously the...
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Roberto Cuoghi
But you look so young!" might seem an incredibly rude thing to say--if said to a thirty-one-year-old. Yet upon meeting Roberto Cuoghi for the first time last February, this apparent faux pas was forgivable. After all, I was expecting to meet the artist...
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Rob Fischer: Cohan and Leslie
Despite the widespread reverence among younger artists for Robert Smithson's art and writing, it's rare to encounter someone who wears his mantle as snugly as Rob Fischer. The notion of entropy (technically a measure of the disorder that exists in...
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Rupert Norfolk: Dicksmith Gallery
Rupert Norfolk's I Beams, 2003, is pretty much just that: four short lengths of steel arrayed, rather than arranged, on the floor. But boy, are these I-beams beautiful; if Selfridge's sold designer construction materials, they might look like this....
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Salvador Dali: Philadelphia Museum of Art
Hail to the newborn Salvador Dali, so often scorned by the last century! Now resurrected in a retrospective for his hundredth birthday (in 2004), he is making a vengeful comeback that will open eyes both old and young. It turns out that he is not only...
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Seamus Harahan: Spencer Brownstone Gallery
Seamus Harahan's large-scale, three-channel video projection Holylands, 2004, documents the street life of an urban community that looks as if it's populated almost entirely by men and boys. By day, they hang out in groups or meander down the block...
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Service Manual: Pamela M. Lee on Andrea Fraser
Museum Highlights: The Writings of Andrea Fraser, edited by Alexander Alberro. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 320 pages. $40. WHEN ANDREA FRASER'S VIDEO Untitled was first shown in 2003, the reactions across the media spectrum were all too predictable....
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Shades without Colour: Keith Sanborn on Chris Marker's OWLS AT NOON
AS HE CLOSES the preface to his Philosophy of Right, Hegel tells us, "When philosophy paints its grey in grey, one form of life has become old, and by means of grey it cannot be rejuvenated, but only known. The owl of Minerva, takes its flight only...
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Stanley Whitney: Esso Gallery
Someone's always ready to lay down the law for abstract painting--to let it know what it's not allowed to do. Most recently, I've noticed art historian Eric de Chassey refusing it the one possibility that used to be considered its very essence: Abstraction...
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Sue De Beer: Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria
Indeterminacy--spatial, temporal, and, above all, emotional--is the central motif of Sue de Beer's absorbing two-channel video installation, Black Sun, 2004-2005. While it continues the exploration of adolescent desire and frustration that's earned...
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The Lay of the Land: An Experiment in Art and Community in Thailand
It's already evening when I arrive by car at the Land, an artists' community in northern Thailand initiated by Kamin Lertchaiprasert and Rirkrit Tiravanija in 1998. Dusk is falling, and the fire that keeps the water buffalo warm at night will soon...
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Thomas Struth: Marian Goodman Gallery
It is like saying: "I classify works of Art in this way: at some I look up and at some I look down." This way of classifying might be interesting. We might discover all sorts of connections between looking up or down at works of Art and looking...
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Tracy Nakayama: Bodybuilder & Sportsman
Vintage porn might be the last place one would expect to encounter Arcadia, but Tracy Nakayama unequivocally positions it there. Her seemingly endless series of sepia ink drawings on paper (twenty-three were shown here) are taken from the erotica of...
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Traffic Control: Joe Scanlan on Social Space and Relational Aesthetics
WHAT MAKES relational aesthetics so boring? I've been wondering a lot lately why an approach to art-making dedicated to social interaction has generated so much underwhelming art. Perhaps the fact that relational aesthetics is dependent on site contingency,...
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Tristan Da Cunha
I sit in urban safety imagining my journey to Tristan da Cunha. I have known about this island for many years, since studying the trade routes in the Southern Atlantic and the rough and fearsome seas of the roaring forties. They call it the remotest...
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True Beauty: Jeffrey Kastner Talks with Matthew Coolidge about the Center for Land Use Interpretation
Sewer systems and traffic patterns; abandoned air-force bases and simulated Main Streets built to train law-enforcement officers; dead shopping malls and towns swallowed by the rising waters of technologically diverted rivers. This is the American...
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Ulrike Heydenreich: Thomas Barry Fine Arts
In her exhibition "Preparatory Objects," Ulrike Heydenreich employed the tools and practices of physical science in an attempt to untangle the chaos of sensory phenomena and understand the human subject's drive to explore new frontiers. Heydenreich's...
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"Universal Experience": Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
The fact that tourism is "the largest industry in the world" is trumpeted several times in the opening pages of the catalogue for "Universal Experience: Art, Life, and the Tourist's Eye," curated by Francesco Bonami and featuring more than seventy...
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"Whatever Happened to Social Democracy?": Rooseum
Leaving its own provocative title unanswered, "Whatever Happened to Social Democracy?" was mostly comprised of works that blandly provided what the curators Pavel Buchler and Charles Esche promised in their text accompanying the show (published as...
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When Attitude Becomes Form: Daniel Birnbaum on Harald Szeemann
HARALD SZEEMANN, who died in February at the age of seventy-one, was the most influential curator of his generation--and, arguably, the most influential of all time, since he practically defined the curator's role as we understand it today. For decades,...
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World Apart: J. Hoberman on the Films of Jia Zhangke
In Chinese society today there are a lot of moments where what's going on could be called a show. --Jia Zhangke, interview with Valerie Jaffee, in Senses of Cinema, July-Sept. 2004 Milieu is everything in the assured, almost ethnographic work of Jia...
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