Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 44, No. 3, November

1000 Words: Josiah McElheny; Talks about an End to Modernity and Conceptual Drawings for a Chandelier, 1965, Both 2005
It's easy to love a Castiglione lamp. Harder, perhaps, to embrace without irony the more tricked-out artifacts of modernism's schizophrenic dotage. Such Jetsons-era concoctions could scarcely be called "timeless," but for artist Josiah McElheny that's...
9th International Istanbul Biennial: Various Venues
In the face of the remarkable glut of biennials that attends the current evolution of globalization in art, a number of questions still remain unanswered: To what degree does the biennial act as a force of transnational gentrification, creating a market...
Adam Cvijanovic: Bellwether
During a lull that followed a brace of solo exhibitions in the early 1990s at Richard Anderson's now-defunct New York gallery, Adam Cvijanovic found work painting decorative murals in extravagant Long Island dining rooms, retreating to his studio in...
A Gesture and a Pose: The Cinema of Mikio Naruse
Mikio Naruse won his accolades in a film world that allowed him to avoid directorial bravura while celebrating the challenges of everyday life. A prolific filmmaker in both the silent and sound eras, he received Japan's "Best One" award in 1935 for...
Alain Sechas: Palais De Tokyo
"Jurassic Pork II" is the second installment of Alain Sechas's comic-book story of a cat named Siegfried "on the trail of Jurassic Pork" hidden deep in a forest. Viewers were given adjustable-beam flashlights to examine the story's cartoon cels, which...
Alejandro Kuropatwa: Museo De Arte Latino-Americano De Buenos Aires
For Argentineans, photographer Alejandro Kuropatwa (1956-2003) embodied a new type of celebrity, born from the freedom and anxiety of the '80s as the country emerged from military dictatorship. Eccentric, witty, and openly gay, he is remembered as...
All Things Being Equal
With the unveiling of major new bodies of work at the 2004 Carnegie International in Pittsburgh and at her gallery in New York this year, ISA GENZKEN stretched the limits of an already-diverse oeuvre and, indeed, the very boundaries of sculpture today....
Alvise Bittente: Galleria Perugi
Alvise Bittente reproduces insignificant objects in ink on paper, following a serial cataloguing scheme: wastebaskets, trash cans, clothing, furniture, and whatever else one finds in the spaces of everyday life. Everything can be registered and put...
Carl Michael Von Hausswolff: Beaconsfield
The steady but almost imperceptible pulse of the sound track and the uncanny images of Carl Michael von Hausswolff's film Hashima, Japan (made with Thomas Nordanstad), 2002, spark the same quickening of adrenaline and awareness as when you're finding...
Chris Burden: Locus+
This July 28, the Newcastle/Gateshead quayside hosted the Tall Ships Races, an annual celebration of nineteenth-century maritime technology. A flotilla of over one hundred ships, their decks filled with activity, left Newcastle to a backdrop of waving...
Circuit City: Tom Vanderbilt on Pixelated Architecture
Viva the facade as computer screen! Viva facades not reflecting light but emanating light--the building as a digital sparkling source of information, not as an abstract glowing source of light!... Viva iconography--not carved in stone for eternity but...
Corin Sworn: ZieherSmith
Children's playgrounds have long been characterized by a combination of artificial materials, intense colors, and oversize geometric forms, making them natural subjects for an artist interested in the flows of influence among Minimalist sculpture,...
"Cut: Film as Found Object in Contemporary Video"; Milwaukee Art Museum
In 1919-20, Hannah Hoch juxtaposed figures and text sourced from popular print media to critique the male-dominated culture of Weimar Germany in her photomontage Schitt mit dem Kuchenmesser Dada durch die letze weimarer Bierbauch-kulturepoche Deutschlands...
David Adjaye
David Adjaye is a London-based architect. He is currently working on buildings for inIVA/Autograph and the Bernie Grant Centre, both in London, and for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver. In January, Whitechapel Art Gallery will host "David Adjaye:...
David Hullfish Bailey: Daniel Hug
If American painters continue to doggedly mine the border between abstraction and representation, it is because they remain, in general, conflicted on the issue. Neither a painter nor really a sculptor, David Hullfish Bailey has found it more productive...
Devil in the Details: Greil Marcus on Harvey Kurtzman
BEGINNING ON NOVEMBER 20, through March of next year, you can go into the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles and see the postwar half of the ambitious survey "Masters of American Comics" (the prewar portion is at the UCLA Hammer Museum). Featured...
"Down the Garden Path: The Artist's Garden after Modernism"; Queens Museum of Art
Curator Valerie Smith seemed to have chosen works for "Down the Garden Path: The Artist's Garden After Modernism" not simply to illustrate a theme, but to enrich it. Fleshing out a well-installed selection of actual works, photographic documentation,...
Edward Burtynsky: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, Stanford University
Uncomfortable ironies abound in Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky's large color photographs of ravaged natural terrain. Burtynsky's subjects have consistently been landscapes in which the process of industrialization has resulted in spectacles that...
Ettore Spalletti: Henry Moore Institute
If the past is a burden, Italian artists bear a heavier one than most. And it's not just all that extraordinary art--the Piero della Francescas and Fra Angelicos that seem to lurk around every corner. Anyone who's ever walked the streets of an immemorial...
Geert Goiris: Zach Feuer Gallery (LFL)
Almost all of the images in Belgian photographer Geert Goiris's first solo exhibition in New York are extraordinary in some respect, but it is not immediately clear what else connects them. Some, such as his shot of an albino wallaby with delicately...
Hanne Darboven: Klemens Gasser & Tanja Grunert, Inc
If you've seen an installation by German artist Hanne Darboven, her signature style will likely have stayed with you: wall-to-wall grids of page-size panels, marked by wavelike rows of what appears to be crossed-out cursive script. This gnomic stand-in...
History Channel: The Films of Mathias Poledna
IN MATHIAS POLEDNA'S 16 mm black-and-white film Version, 2004, silence is deafening. The Los Angeles-based, Austrian-born artist's most recent film features a dark space in which a group of young dancers sway languidly, their movements registering...
In on the Ground Floor: Avalanche and the SoHo Art Scene, 1970-1976
PUBLISHED ONLY THIRTEEN TIMES over the course of six years--from fall 1970 through summer 1976--Avalanche made every issue count. Dense with information and photographs, the magazine functioned as a gallery without walls for art that eschewed architectural...
InSite_05: Various Venues, San Diego and Tijuana
When first appearing in 1992, inSite--a biennial artistic event that engages the border area between San Diego and Tijuana through a series of specially commissioned and site-specific works and exhibitions--caused barely a ripple, being underreported...
Isaac Julien: MAK Center for Art and Architecture
Isaac Julien's recent exhibition at MAK Center for Art and Architecture consisted of a group of photographs, some of them triptychs, which are stills from a fourteen-minute film (not shown here) shot in Iceland and northern Sweden in 2004. Collectively...
James Drake: Rhona Hoffman Gallery
Like a latter-day Bernini lost in the deserts of the American Southwest, James Drake, in his recent work, explores the stark and savage milieu of West Texas while assembling a romanticized allegorical overview of his life and oeuvre, treating both...
Jeff Scher: Maya Stendhal Gallery
The saxophone riff audible on entering the gallery seemed at first an appropriate accompaniment to Jeff Scher's second solo exhibition at Maya Stendhal Gallery. With its bouncy, singsong tone, the sound track to the video Trixie, 2005, suited the colorful...
Jeff Wall: Schaulager
As Jeff Wall remarked about this retrospective at the press conference, it's most likely the biggest show he'll ever have. And, indeed, with seventy-two works "Jeff Wall: Photographs, 1978-2004" brought together more than half of the artist's oeuvre....
John Beech: Peter Blum
On the evidence of his recent exhibition at Peter Blum, I suspect John Beech is trying to one-up Marcel Duchamp, Donald Judd, and just about every abstract painter who's ever lived. He cleverly constructs what can look like (and what very occasionally...
John McCracken: Zwirner & Wirth
It's a truism that the simplest problems are the toughest to crack, and a question posed some forty years ago by the artist John McCracken is no exception: "If a piece is blue, what color is the space around it?" Scrawled into the pages of a notebook,...
Keith Farquhar: Nyehaus
Relatively unknown in the United States, Edinburgh-based artist Keith Farquhar has been exhibiting cool, humorous, at times obliquely political drawings, paintings, and sculptures in Europe for nearly a decade. Deadpan figures made of clothing have...
Libby Black: Heather Marx Gallery
A cooked lobster, a tin of caviar, a golden Louis Vuitton champagne bucket containing a bottle of Cristal, and a Chanel picnic basket with a baguette protruding from it are spread on a Burberry blanket in a feast of name-brand luxury. All that's missing...
Lucy McKenzie: Metro Pictures
The press release for Scottish artist Lucy McKenzie's New York solo debut curiously asserted that one of the five series of works on paper in the show consisted of "studies of Tintin from life." Created in 1929 by Belgian artist Herge, Tintin--preposterously...
Luis Salaberria: Panta Rhei
Though not widely known outside Madrid, Luis Salaberria is hardly a newcomer; he has been exhibiting for fifteen years, albeit erratically. Throughout this period, his work has been consistent in its use of a personal imagery even while undergoing...
Mark Grotjahn: Blum & POE
The "butterfly" has become to Mark Grotjahn what the target is to Kenneth Noland, the zip was to Barnett Newman, and the color white is to Robert Ryman. Of course Grotjahn is goofing on these and other classic motifs, but more important, he is using...
Maryam Jafri: Malmo Konstmuseum
In Costume Party, 2005, history becomes a chamber play. Written and directed by Maryam Jafri for her first solo museum presentation, the three-screen video installation features nonactors along with film and theater professionals. Other recent works...
Mary Ellen Carroll: Cinema Village/Storefront for Art and Architecture
Billowing American flag Bus deposits people Birds squawk and chirp, jets fly overhead The urban haiku above was pulled from my notes on Mary Ellen Carroll's Federal and is a fairly complete summary of its action. Shot in real time on July 28,...
Maurizio Vetrugno: Carbone. To
Entering the gallery, the viewer was blinded by the light reflected from a wall covered in silver fabric and embroidered with threads of the same color. The images they formed turned out to be symbols associated with Captain Beefheart and His Magic...
Merlin Carpenter: Galerie Christian Nagel
Merlin Carpenter's exhibitions are always attempts to step outside the bounds of the "realm of the possible"--that is, the current conventions of the art industry--the better to criticize them. His latest show continued this attack on art-world consensus...
Michel Auder: (S)extant et Plus
"Auder is a poet of moods, brief encounters, tragic moments of our miserable civilization. When I used to visit him at the Chelsea Hotel, around 1970, the video camera was always there, always going, a part of his house, a part of his life, eyes, hands....
Monique Prieto: Cheim & Read
WALKING BOTH FORWARDS AND BACKWARDS. This phrase, which appears in one of eight new canvases exhibited recently by Los Angeles-based painter Monique Prieto at Cheim & Read, neatly encapsulates the artist's current project. A longtime inhabitant...
Otto Muhl: Sammlung Falckenberg/Phoenix Kulturstiftung
Last year MAK Vienna presented its comprehensive Otto Muhl retrospective as an emphatically painting-heavy show, though his work as a performance artist filled a good portion of the accompanying catalogue. In Hamburg, whence the retrospective traveled...
Patrick Hill
FROM THE LAST DECADE, the most demanding critique on sculpture is Dennis Cooper's Period (2000). Dedicated to Vincent Fecteau, the novel becomes a meditation on form in the face of death, which is also to say, on the form of the face of death--facing...
Peter Doig: Museum Ludwig
The metaphor of "cultural translation" has been a favorite theme of cultural criticism and art discourse for some time. And in fact the processes of appropriation and translation, and their attendant displacements of cultural and contextual meaning,...
"Remote Viewing: Invented Worlds in Recent Painting and Drawing"; Whitney Museum of American Art
Artists are an opinionated bunch, so one often wonders what those included in group exhibitions think of the context in which their work has been placed. Sometimes I imagine they feel lucky; on other occasions dismayed. "Remote Viewing" triggered the...
Remote Viewing: Matthew Stadler on the Time-Based Art Festival
FOR TEN DAYS every September since 2003, the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art's Time-Based Art Festival (TBA) turns Oregon's largest city into a temporary international performance hub, casting local artists alongside better-known global acts...
Risaku Suzuki: Gallery Koyanagi
Risaku Suzuki's solo exhibition "Between the Sea and the Mountain--Kumano" brought together recent photos taken in the holy mountains of Kumano, the ancient Shinto capital. The sequence of photos reconstructs an approach to its sacred waterfalls. As...
"Russia!": Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Remember the 1966 movie The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming? Well, guess what? The Russians are back, only this time they are showering the West with money rather than ideology. Or is it so simple as that? Russian intellectuals were in...
Shapes of Things to Come
Although widely known for nearly a quarter century, Elizabeth Murray's singular oeuvre has continually eluded easy categorization within established historical narratives. Now, on the occasion of her retrospective at New York's Museum of Modern Art,...
Sol LeWitt: Metropolitan Museum of Art/Madison Square Park/PaceWildenstein
Sol LeWitt's practice might be perpetually fecund, but this summer still saw him achieve such an unprecedented level of visibility in New York City that one paper was prompted to unceremoniously declare it "The Summer of Sol." LeWitts were encamped...
Virtual Disaster: Jennifer Allen on M7red's Inundacion!
WHAT IS THE role of urban architecture in a natural disaster? As Hurricane Katrina showed, buildings have few options--weather the storm or collapse. The drowning city has become a familiar and terrifying international reality: Witness not just Katrina...
Wang Du: Vancouver Art Gallery
A cartoon in three-dimensional form, Paris-based Chinese expatriate Wang Du's recent exhibition at Vancouver Art Gallery took the form of a misshapen array of bellicose and lascivious golems cultivated from Chinese military propaganda, Internet porn,...
Who Do You Love? Isa Genzken in Conversation with Wolfgang Tillmans
Isa Genzken: I can give you a little tour of my studio. This is a piece for which I finally found a title today. It's called Kinder filmen [Children Who Film]. I find it's a beautiful title. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Wolfgang Tillmans: That's what...