Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 9, May

Alberto Garcia Alix: Galeria Juana De Aizpuru. (Seville)
Alberto Garcia Alix is a veteran photographer whom the art world had thought little about up until a few years ago. Now that our sense of the medium has expanded, his work, strongly tied to a specific time and place-Madrid in the '80s-has succeeded...
Andrea Fraser: Friedrich Petzel Gallery/P.H.A.G. (New York)
In 1998 Andrea Fraser announced that she would no longer perform as Jane Castleton, the museum docent whose tours had left unsuspecting audiences scratching their heads over the past decade. While her work as Castleton had been based on a misrepresentation...
Annika Larsson: Andrea Rosen Gallery. (New York)
In her 1974 essay "Fascinating Fascism," a biting critique of the rehabilitation of Leni Riefenstahl, Susan Sontag outlines how certain elements of fascist aesthetics--notably choreographed domination, pageantry, and an insistent glamorization of...
Artur Nikodem: Robert Mann Gallery. (New York)
At a time when Chelsea is filled with wall-size, color-saturated photographs pursuing "the painting of modern life," there is something perversely appealing about a show of minuscule black-and-white photographs made by a painter. Known for his Tyrolean...
Atom Egoyan/Juliao Sarmento: Museu De Arte Contemporanea De Serralves. (Porto)
What was so fascinating about Exotica (1994), the film that for many of us marked the discovery of Atom Egoyan, was the way that it enticed you to get close, as close as possible, to let yourself be suffocated by the proximity of the voice of the...
Bernard Voita/Frank Thiel: Galerie Bob Van Orsouw. (Zurich)
Bernard Voita's gray images remind one of Gerhard Richter's paintings of black-and-white snapshots. But here it is photography that recalls painting, rather than vice versa. The alternation of blurred and perfectly focused areas evokes spaces that...
Bruno Serralongue: Centre National De la Photographie. (Paris)
Expo 2000 in Hannover, Hong Kong's restoration to China in 1997, the Free Tibet Concert organized by the Beastie Boys in Washington, DC, in June 1998: events of unequal importance but media events all, and all of which have been "covered" by photographer...
Conor Mcgrady: NFA Space/Chicago Cultural Center. (Chicago)
In his recent large-scale paintings, Conor McGrady at once mines the tradition of full-length portraiture and turns it on its head. Mimicking the compositional style of official commissioned paintings by artists from Giovanni Battista Moroni to...
"Die Gewalt Ist der Rand Aller Dinge": Generali Foundation. (Vienna)
At the beginning of each year, the vestals of the Austrian temple of Conceptual art, the Generali Foundation, surrender their austere chambers for the sake of experiment: an exhibition straight from the artists' laboratory. For 2002, Alice Creischer...
Edward Burtynsky: Charles Cowles Gallery. (New York)
Gone are the days of big canvases glutting exhibition spaces, now that photography has largely replaced painting as the medium of choice among contemporary artists. The "new painting" often has little to do with painting itself, of course, except...
Eva Hesse: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. (Reviews)
Eva Hesse remains a strangely undecidable figure. Since her death at a premature age thirty-two years ago, critics and historians have been unanimous in their acclaim for her art but with little consensus as to what makes it important. Much of the...
Francesco Vezzoli: New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York. (Reviews)
What's not to like about a short film featuring Helmut Berger playing Joan Collins playing Dynasty's Alexis Carrington? The melodramatic scenarios of Italian artist Francesco Vezzoli's productions take place in environments of luxury and lassitude,...
Grand Allusion: James Meyer Talks with Anne Truitt
ANNE TRUITT'S HOUSE IN WASHINGTON, DC, SITS ON A HILL above the city. A typically Mid-Atlantic dwelling of a certain vintage--shingled, with a porch and pale blue shutters--it is easy to miss. The artist's studio in the backyard resembles one of...
Hamish Fulton: Tate Britain. (London)
Hamish Fulton has sometimes been regarded as the poor man's Richard Long. Both artists attended St. Martin's School of Art in the late '60s, where they became friends. They simultaneously developed a new form of landscape art in which country walks...
Hungry Eye: The Photography of Suzanne Doppelt
One of the astonishing disclosures in Jacques Lacan's ethics of psychoanalysis concerns the crucial desire of man, which the analyst views as an insatiable craving for privation. The troubadour of medieval epics, who must submit to debilitating...
Jennifer Dalton: Plus Ultra. (New York)
In her latest exhibition, "A Task No One Assigned," Jennifer Dalton responded to a comment by New Yorker critic Peter Schjeldahl characterizing art production as unmandated or self-commissioned effort. "What makes these exercises art?" Schjeldahl...
La Ribot: Galeria Soledad Lorenzo. (Madrid)
La Ribot comes from the world of dance but her crossover into the art context has elicited unexpected praise in the press. In a country like Spain, where television gossip shows have stooped to a new level of crudity in their nonstop focus on sex,...
Larry Clark. (First Break)
Vince Aletti looks back at Larry Clark's checkered youth and the events that led to the publication of Tulsa In 1971. As a teenager, Larry Clark spent three humiliating years pressed into the family business: going door-to-door in Tulsa, Oklahoma,...
Lecia Dole-Recio: Richard Telles Fine Art. (Los Angeles)
It's been a rough week. In rapid succession I saw a painting of Nicole Kidman as Salome carrying the severed head of Tom Cruise; read a review of a show in which the writer, not satisfied with the phrase "jaw-dropping facility and prickly verve,"...
Letters
JOLLY GOOD FELLOW To the Editor: In reviewing Brushes with History: Writing on Art from The Nation 1865-2001 ["Weekly Standard," March], Jonathan Weinberg says that I was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and kindly remarks that it was "richly merited."...
Lily Van der Stokker: Galleria Francesca Kaufmann. (Milan)
Dutch artist Lily van der Stokker covered the exterior of an entire building with white on pink decorative motifs for Expo 2000 in Hannover. Adjusting this ornamental gigantism to the more ordinary dimensions of an interior gallery space, the artist...
Lynne Cohen: National Gallery of Canada. (Ottawa)
Lynne Cohen documents spaces in which the everyday is not so much lived as staged: empty laboratories, showrooms, medical classrooms, corporate offices and corridors, and leisure spaces (spas, party halls). She began to photograph these deserted...
Maciej Wisniewski. (Hotlist)
Maciej Wisniewski is the creator and chief scientist of netomat, a network- and software-based art project that has been shown at such venues as the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and ZKM, Karlsruhe, Germany. A 1993 NEW YORKER cartoon...
Max Renkel: Galleria Ugo Ferranti. (Rome)
The work of Max Renkel carries out a wide-ranging investigation of the procedures, logical connections, unpredictable rhythms, and imperceptible passages that, in the elaboration of an image on canvas, intervene between idea and execution. In so...
May 1972
Thirty years ago this month, contributing editor Peter Plagens took the measure of a nascent Pasadena art scene. Senior editor Eric C. Banks revisits the chronicles of Artforum's California man. "ARTFORUM--BORN IN SAN FRANCISCO (1962), reared...
Mild about Larry
WHEN LAWRENCE RINDER WAS NAMED CURATOR OF CONTEMPORARY ART AT THE WHITNEY TWO YEARS AGO, HE INHERITED ONE OF THE TOUGHEST GIGS IN THE WORLD OF ART: THE WHITNEY BIENNIAL. BECAUSE THE BIENNIAL REMAINS CONTEMPORARY ART'S BEST-KNOWN SURVEY, HOSTED BY...
Nancy Burson: Grey Art Gallery. (New York)
Nancy Burson has devoted the past two decades to the human face, not so much to learn from it as to learn what it cannot tell us. This midcareer survey, "Seeing and Believing: The Art of Nancy Burson" (co-organized with the Blaffer Gallery, the...
NIC Hess: Kunstmuseum. (Winterthur, Switzerland)
Occupying a single large blacked-out room, Nic Hess's expansive wall painting coalesced into its own galaxy. Or at least it seemed that way when one was drawn directly to the stars--gleaming a bit too brightly in the distance by dint of ultraviolet...
Nigel Cooke: Modern Art. (London)
As painting's capacity to produce credible representations of reality became increasingly questionable, artists engaged with landscape tended to turn to mediums that seemed more immediately connected to the real (photography, Land Art), leaving...
Noblesse Obliged: Geoffrey O'Brien on Eric Rohmer. (Film)
THAT ERIC ROHMER, NOW EIGHTY-TWO, should embark on a technically innovative film set during the French Revolution underscores the quiet experimentalism of his filmmaking, an experimentalism sometimes indistinguishable from a return to the earliest...
Norman Rockwell: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. (New York)
Norman Rockwell is not a complicated artist but he is a complicated case. The tides that washed him up at the Guggenheim must have included the democratic currents of the '60s, which encompassed, in art, the anti-Clement Greenberg, pro-kitsch, fun-loving...
Oliver Herring: Max Protech. (New York)
The shimmer of Oliver Herring's signature knitted-Mylar sculptures made over the past decade reflects the influence of Ethyl Eichelberger, the performance artist and transvestite whose career (abruptly ended by his AIDS-related suicide in 1991)...
Paradise Reframed
AS THE DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART'S RETROSPECTIVE "THOMAS STRUTH" GOES ON VIEW THIS MONTH, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR DANIEL BIRNBAUM REEXAMINES THE ARTIST'S CAREER AND HIS PLACE AMONG A GENERATION OF PHOTOGRAPHERS WHOSE LARGE-SCALE IMAGES HAVE MADE THE MEDIUM...
"Paris: Capital of the Arts 1900-1968"; Royal Academy of Arts, London. (Reviews)
Rarely does such a "major" historical exhibition fail so lamentably to account for why its many works were included and why they were ordered in such a way. It is equally rare for a show of such size and ambition, covering a period of extraordinary...
Patricia Piccinini: Tolarno Galleries. (Melbourne)
Patricia Piccinini's recent exhibition "One Night Love" included a group of the furniture-sized, biomorphic fiberglass objects she calls Car Nuggets and five modular bas-relief wall panels made of plastic and embalmed in layers of glossy, quasi-holographic...
Phillip Allen: The Approach. (London)
There's a shape--long, thin, and tapering to a rounded summit--that extends up the center of one of Philip Allen's paintings, Beezerspline (Dark Version), 2002. Actually, it's not so much a shape as an area defined by the many overlapping blobs...
Preview Summer 2002
Three times a year Artforum looks ahead to the coming season. The following survey previews forty shows opening around the world between May 1 and August 31. Matthew Barney: The CREMASTER Cycle MUSEUM LUDWIG, COLOGNE Originally slated to...
Richard Ballard: Rosenberg + Kaufman Fine Art. (New York)
The oeuvre of Richard Ballard, a Parisbased British artist who's spent considerable time in New York, can be read as a progression from lyric figurative expressionism to a pared-down, even brooding exploration of mostly natural forms. The tenor...
Safe and Sound: Peter Plagens on Neal Benezra. (News)
The first thing you need to know about the wonderful world of art museums is that everything that happens in them or with them or to them is not only always perfectly normal but also going exactly according to plan. (God forbid anybody connected...
Saint Clair Cemin: Cheim & Read. (New York)
Saint Clair Cemin's recent show was a marvel of visual wit, acknowledging and playfully disturbing the conventions of sculpture with a mischievous humor that verges on madness. From a distance Three Graces (all works 2002) looks like Expressionist...
Shooting Stars: Bruce Hainley on Ron Galella. (Slant)
ONE OF RON GALELLA'S candid portraits of Liza Minnelli, taken in 1968 at the premiere of A Dandy in Aspic, shows Judy's little gin in an amazing white suit, black shirt, and white silk tie, a daisy brooch on her swank lapel, no longer The Sterile...
Simon Starling: Casey Kaplan. (New York)
Simon Starling's recent installation looked back at the modernist attempt to dissolve the barriers between art and the environment while recasting modernism itself as a cage. A well-orchestrated hybrid of disciplines and references, the work fell...
Steve Lafreniere. (Top Ten)
Steve Lafreniere is an independent curator and an editor at Index magazine. He is currently writing a memoir about "the real '60s." 1 MARY BROGGER Ten years ago Brogger's chain-mail draperies and welded-steel Queen Anne chairs made me reconsider...
Tale of the Tape: David Joselit on Radical Software
THIRTY-TWO YEARS AGO Ralph Lee Smith published an influential appeal concerning the future of cable access television (CATV) in the pages of The Nation. "The Wired Nation" heralded nothing short of a revolution: As cable systems are installed...
The Opposite of Sex: Sarah Boxer on the Photographs of Lewis Carroll. (from the Vault Preview)
TAKE AWAY THE WHIFF OF PEDOPHILIA IN THE photographs of Lewis Carroll and what's left? Perhaps the idea that Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, aka Carroll, was playing on the boundaries between dreaming and waking and between theatricality and absorption....
Thomas Struth: Talks about His "Paradise" Series. (A Thousand Words)
At this point, "Paradise" consists of twenty-five photographs I'm just beginning to understand. intuition is an old word, but many things sprout from inner processes and needs and then take on a form. My approach to the jungle pictures might be...
Tom Knechtel: Grant Selwyn Fine Art. (Los Angeles)
Tom Knechtel knows how to load up a picture, but he also knows how to pare it down, and in cobbling together the intricate, ornate, and flamboyant, as well as the loose, minimal, and austere, the artist produces what ought to be visual train wrecks...
Venetian Brass: Steven Henry Madoff on the Biennale Brouhaha. (News)
WHEN IT WAS ANNOUNCED in March that Francesco Bonami had been appointed director of visual arts for the 2003 Venice Biennale, one imagined relieved silence falling over the roofs of the city. But of course in the great comic opera of Italian civic...
Vibeke Tandberg: C/O-Atle Gerhardsen. (Berlin)
Forget the prince. Vibeke Tandberg knows what every princess really wants: a shiny new mountain bike. The Norwegian artist, who settled in Oslo after residencies in London and New York, has produced eight large-scale color photographs that trace...
Worldly Wise: Brian Wallis on Documenta11. (World Report Preview)
ANYONE WHO KNOWS ANYTHING about Documenta11 knows that the theme of this year's rendition of the quinquennial blockbuster is globalism. But these days globalism can mean a lot of things, most of which have to do with economic multinationalism and...
Yinka Shonibare: Studio Museum in Harlem, New York. (Reviews)
A perceptive New York dealer I needn't name once called a prolific artist I shouldn't name "too smart to be an artist." Words, like pictures, can lie, but indications are that Yinka Shonibare and his art are equally and exceedingly smart. Shonibare...
Zak Smith: Fredericks Freiser Gallery. (New York)
The early word on Zak Smith was that he's some kid whose paintings had been "discovered" by the art world. Smith's recent debut, "20 Eyes in My Head," bore out the preliminary description of the scrappy young painter with an eye (or twenty?) trained...