Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 80, No. 2, Spring

Changing Senses in Genesis B
In Genesis 3:5 the Tempter presents the forbidden apple to Eve as he makes her this well-known promise: "For God doth know that in what day soever you shall eat thereof, your eyes shall be opened: and you shall be as Gods, knowing good and evil." (1)...
Interpreting Female Agency and Responsibility in the Miller's Tale and the Merchant's Tale
1 Geoffrey Chaucer frequently displays keen interest in questions of female agency and responsibility by rendering his female characters at key moments in silences, deferred answers, absences, and unexpected submissiveness. (1) Chaucer's interest...
Milton's Purgatorio
Because Milton was preoccupied with the shape of his own poetic career, many of the works he wrote before Paradise Lost reflect his long-term plan to write a great epic and his anxiousness about when and how he would make himself ready to undertake...
Nostalgia, the Classics, and the Intimations Ode: Wordsworth's Forgotten Education
Between 1819 and 1824 Wordsworth undertook a translation of Virgil's Aeneid, which eventually included Books 1 to 3 nearly complete and only two further, unconnected passages: a brief fragment (six lines in English) from Book 4, and a more substantial...
The Naming of Beowulf and Ecgtheow's Feud
One odd feature of Beowulf, which has attracted some notice but as yet no detailed explanation, is the poet's delay in naming his main character. (1) He identifies him first, at home among the Geats hearing of Grendel's ravages, only as Hygelac's thane...