Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 1-2, Spring

American Gothic Grants Tennessee Williams a "Woodian" Play
In the opening sentence of his 1935 essay "The Painter and the Writer," Grant Wood writes, "painters have been accused in the last few years of poaching on the domain of writers." (1) Two years later, Tom "Tennessee" Williams would do the opposite,...
Anne Finch's Aviary: Or, Why She Never Wrote "The Bird and the Arras"
Readers of Anne Finch's "The Bird and the Arras" have analyzed its portrayal of the trapped bird as a symbol of women or women writers within a patriarchal structure. Lucy Brashear considers the poem a "chilling poetic revelation of the circumscribed...
Coining Words on the Elizabethan and Jacobean Stage
The Theater is your Poets Royal-Exchange, upon which, their Muses (ye are now turnd to Merchants) meeting, barter away that light commodity of words ... your Groundling, and Gallery Commoner buyes his sport by the penny, and, like a Hagler, is glad...
Ronsard, Horace, and the Dynamics of Poetic Creativity
In the concluding poem of his Sonets pour Helene (1578), Pierre de Ronsard subtly summarizes the nature of his poetic creativity. The verse, "Je chantois ces Sonets, amoureux d'une Heleine," characterizes the sequence as a series of songs emanating...
Shenstone, Woodhouse, and Mid-Eighteenth-Century Poetics: Genre and the Elegiac-Pastoral Landscape
The shoemaking poet, James Woodhouse, has attracted scholarly attention primarily in terms of his laboring-class status and the ways in which he negotiated this status in his writings. In The Lab'ring Muses, for example, William J. Christmas reads...
Textual Borrowings, Theological Mobility, and the Lollard Pater Noster Commentary
The ways in which Lollards made use of existing orthodox materials such as biblical commentaries and manuals of religious instruction is a subject that merits further investigation. Recent studies by Shannon McSheffrey, Matti Peikola, Fiona Somerset,...
The 1740 Roxana: Defoe, Haywood, Richardson, and Domestic Fiction
During the denouement of Daniel Defoe's Roxana (1724), the protagonist's daughter Susan from her first marriage reappears, prompting Roxana to fear that the "Life full of prosperous Wickedness" she has led since abandoning her five legitimate children...
The English Destiny of Tennyson's Camelot
FOUR FALSE WOMEN Alfred Tennyson's prefatory manuscript note to "The Coming of Arthur," the first of his Idylls of the King, (1) remarks that its "form"--the next sentence implicitly indicates verse form--is "purposely more archaic than that of...