Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 4, Fall

"A Pleasant and Terrible Reverence": Maintenance of Majesty in Sidney's 'New Arcadia.' (Philip Sidney)
Launching into his most dangerous literary performance--his letter urging Elizabeth not to marry Francis, duke of Alencon--Sir Philip Sidney addresses the queen routinely, as his "Most feared and beloved, most sweet and gracious Sovereign."(1) This...
Byron and 'The Liberal': Periodical as Political Posture
On October 15, 1822, Lord Byron and Leigh Hunt published a journal that appeared in four issues between 1822 and 1823. Byron's choice of title for this periodical, The Liberal, represents one of the most significant uses of the word as a noun in the...
Coherence in 'Biographia Literaria': God, Self, and Coleridge's "Seminal Principle."
Coleridge's brief discussion of imagination (primary and secondary) and fancy in Chapter 13 of Biographia Literaria has been called, "perhaps the most famous single prose passage in all of English literature, yet ... also one of the most baffling."(1)...
Dichotomize and Conquer: "Womman Handlyng" in 'Handlyng Synne.'
Robert Mannyng of Brunne's Handlyng Synne, a 12,658 line poem in octosyllabic couplets, is a Middle English confessional collection of exhortations and highly moral illustrative tales. A translation, adaption, and expansion of the anonymous Anglo-Norman...
The 'Champion' and the Chapter on Hats in 'Jonathan Wild.' (Henry Fielding)
Coleridge once exclaimed that Fielding's little chapter "Of Hats" in Jonathan Wild (2.6), "brief as it is, exceeds any thing even in Swift's Lilliput, or Tale of the Tub. How forcibly it applies to the Whigs, Tories, and Radicals of our own times."(1)...
The Play World and the Real World: Chivalry in 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.'
The work of such new historicists as Stephen Greenblatt and Lee Patterson has focused the attention of literary critics on the meaning of history and the historical importance of the symbolic, the notion that man "above all makes meaning."(1) To emphasize...