Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 3, Summer

A Conduct Book for Richard II
So Chaucer identifies, in one of his more explicit source references, the book which he has used for the description of Nature and her parliament of fowls.(1) Unlike the "olde bok totorn" (110), the Macrobius text of and commentary on Cicero's Somnium...
Chaucer's Poetry, Versioning, and Hypertext
Thirty years ago, Chaucer's poetry, versioning, and hypertext would have been an unlikely triumvirate. Chaucer's poetry had been read and enjoyed for centuries, of course, and was by then the focus of a thriving critical and professional industry....
New Comedy in 'King Lear.'
Always more or less implicit in comedy reside energies destabilizing and subversive.(1) From the beginning, Aristotle recognized this darker potential, carefully stipulating that the hamartema, "fault, error or deformity," of comedy be "not painful...
Of Graves, Caves, and Subterranean Dwellings: 'Eoroscraef' and 'Eorosele' in the 'Wife's Lament.'
The past three decades have witnessed a bewildering variety of interpretations of the Old English Wife's Lament. We are no longer even certain that it is, in fact, the lament of a "wife"; critics have suggested that the narrator is a lordless retainer,...
The Genealogy of Galahad and the New Age of the World in the Old French Prose 'Queste del Saint Graal.'
In the Old French prose romance La Queste del Saint Graal, much is revealed both to the protagonists and the reader in visions.(1) And while the meaning of these visions often seems relatively straightforward, it is characteristic of this romance that...
'The London Merchant' and Eighteenth-Century British Law
There is nothing which so generally strikes the imagination, and engages the affections of mankind, as the right of property; or that sole and despotic dominion which one man claims and exercises over the external things of the world, in total exclusion...