Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 74, No. 3, Summer

A Mock-Biblical Controversy: Sir Richard Blackmore in the 'Dunciad.'
Why does Sir Richard Blackmore play such a prominent role in all the versions of Alexander Pope's Dunciad? Isn't Pope's legendary malice most likely at work here, pillorying a figure who, even in his own lifetime, had begun the slide into becoming the...
Kings and Counselors: The Politics of Francis Bacon's Rhetorical Theory
Late in March of 1603, just before and immediately after Elizabeth's death, Francis Bacon was scrambling to secure for himself a position in the service of the Queen's successor, James VI of Scotland.(1) Two days before her death, Bacon offered his services...
Letters of Travel Advice from the Earl of Essex to the Earl of Rutland: Some Comments
The three letters of travel advice which Robert Devereux, 2nd earl of Essex, allegedly sent to Roger Manners, 5th earl of Rutland, are among the most widely cited documents from the late Elizabethan period.(1) For modern scholars, they constitute a treasure...
Pope, Publishing, and Popular Interpretations of the 'Dunciad Variorum.'
Alexander Pope has often been portrayed, both during his lifetime and in this century, as a plotting, spiteful little man who used his pen to exact vengeance upon friend and foe alike, often for petty transgressions. Nowhere, according to such critics,...
"Terrific and Unprincipled Compositions": The Reception of 'Lover's Vows' and 'Mansfield Park.'
Austen's Mansfield Park continues to attract a good deal of attention from critics, but little unanimity of view. In particular, recent years have seen careful attempts to reconstruct the varying contexts of the novel, relating it to conduct literature,...
Thomas Warton's "Observations on the 'Faerie Queene' of Spenser", Samuel Johnson's "History of the English Language," and Warton's History of English Poetry": Reciprocal Indebtedness?
Several commentators have discussed in varying detail the long, sometimes troubled friendship of Samuel Johnson and Thomas Warton, which began in the early 1750s (when Johnson was in his forties and Warton in his twenties) and apparently lasted until...