Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 76, No. 4, Fall

"Genesis" 549-51 and 623-25: Narrative Frame and Devilish Cunning
In the Old English poem Genesis B, the tempter, having failed against Adam, turns to Eve, persuades her to eat of the fruit, and exhorts her to approach Adam. At the beginning and at the end of this temptation are two passages each of which makes some...
Grammars of Space: The Language of London from Stow's 'Survey' to Defoe's 'Tour.' (John Stow, Daniel Defoe)
But suppose a very large Map could be drawn, still the Inconveniency would be such, that the Inspector must have a magnifying Glass to read what he looke for, without such a Book as this, to direct in what part of the Town it lies. There is no Place...
Guy Fawkes, Dr. Slop, and the Actions of Providence
By the time of Tristram Shandy's birth on November Fifth, 1718, a month short of the "nine kalendar months" he claims have passed since the misfortunes of his conception, that date had been for more than a century a day of thanksgiving for the providential...
Incriminating Documents: Nechaev and Dostoevsky in J.M. Coetzee's 'The Master of Petersburg.' (Sergei Nechaev, Fyodor Dostoevsky)
In violent times, some novelists abandon literature altogether, taking to the streets or barricades; others, of course, bring the streets and barricades into their fiction, exposing suffering and injustice, arguing, pleading, and persuading. Those who...
Sermons on Sermonizing: The Pulpit Rhetoric of Swift and Sterne
Jonathan Swift and Laurence Sterne have frequently been compared as eighteenth-century satirists. As sermonists they have received less attention, mainly because the sermon is a traditional genre, perceived as having little room for individual expression,...
Sir William Davenant's Use of Shakespeare in 'The Law against Lovers' (1662)
Sir William Davenant's The Law Against Lovers (1662) was the first adaptation of Shakespeare performed on the Restoration stage after the reopening of the London theatres. This amalgamation unites Beatrice and Benedick from Much Ado About Nothing with...