Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 74, No. 4, Fall

'A True Survey of the Ground': Defoe's 'Tour' and the Rise of Thematic Cartography
Despite writing an entire economic atlas of the world, Atlas Maritimus (1728), containing maps by none other than Edmond Halley himself, Defoe is still considered to have been a mere dabbler in the field of geography. The prevailing perception is that...
Bedlam, 'The Changeling,' 'The Pilgrim' and the Protestant Critique of Catholic Good Works
1 In Mystical Bedlam: Madness, Anxiety and Healing in Seventeenth-Century England, Michael MacDonald notes that "Bedlamites swarmed through the imaginations of Jacobean playwrights and pamphleteers, but the famous asylum was in truth a tiny hovel...
"Exemplify My Frailty": Representing English Women in 'De Casibus' Tragedy
Although a great deal of work has been done in the past twenty years tracking the representation of women in the Renaissance, little attention has been paid to the depiction of women in De casibus tragedy.(1) By De casibus tragedy I mean here collections...
Sweetness and Sweat: The Extraordinary Emanations in Fragment Eight of the 'Canterbury Tales.'
Among the arresting array of images in the opening lines of what Peter Brown has aptly called the "dynamic but controlled" Canon's Yeoman's Prologue,(1) Chaucer underscores none quite as graphically as the bodily outpouring of sweat. Our first mark of...
Swift's 6 August 1735 Letter to Mary Pendarves Delany: "All Other Days I Eat My Chicken Alone like a King."
1 Included in the August, 1834, number of Louis A. Godey's The Lady's Book(1) is a "Letter, from Dean Swift, to the Celebrated Mrs. Delany," one we are told "not published in any edition of the Dean's works" (78). The four-paragraph letter, signed...
The Myth of the Fall in 'Women in Love.' (D.H. Lawrence)
The extent to which the myth of the fall permeates Women in Love(1) has not previously been recognized. The novel examines language, mythos, the whole logocentric tradition, revealing an underlying connection and a gap between the Biblical myth of the...