Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 77, No. 4, Fall

From Anna Barbauld's Hymns in Prose to William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience
When Northrop Frye refers in Fearful Symmetry to the relationship between Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience as mutual satire with "double-edged irony," he uses the term "satire" in an unusual way. Frye argues that pastoral poetry traditionally...
Matriarchal Mythopoesis: Naylor's Mama Day
J'entends donc par "Femme" ce qui ne se represente pas, ce qui ne se dit pas, ce qui reste en dehors des nominations et des ideologies. -- JULIA KRISTEVA Like Cat's Cradle, An American Dream, Fiscadoro, The Name of the Rose, Gravity's Rainbow, and...
Something out of the Common Groove: Joyce and Originality
... being tantamount to inferring from the nonpresence of inverted commas (sometimes called quotation marks) on any page that its author was always constitutionally incapable of misappropriating the spoken words of others. Finnegans Wake If I...
T. S. Eliot and the Fragmented Selves: From "Suppressed Complex" to Sweeney Agonistes
When lovely woman stoops to folly, we do not think of death; we think of suppressed complexes ... --ALDOUS HUXLEY, Jesting Pilate (1926) T. S. Eliot, during ten years of personal stress commencing in 1915 used in poetry the psychological phenomenon...
Where "Byron Used to Ride": Locating the Victorian Travel Poet in Clough's Amours De Voyage and Dipsychus
In the Spring of 1849, Giuseppe Mazzini, leader of the newly-declared Roman Republic, fought off attacks from French troops seeking to restore papal sovereignty over the city. At the same time, he withstood a siege of another sort: an obscure English...