Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 2, Spring

"A Gallant Heart to the Empire." Autoethnography and Imperial Identity in Mary Seacole's Wonderful Adventures
1 It seems fitting that the bi-centenary year of Mary Seacole's birth has been marked by a spate of discoveries and publications about the author of Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands (1857). In January 2005 a "lost" portrait of Seacole,...
Directed Readings: Paratext in a Game at Chess and the Tragedie of Philotas
It has become a commonplace in studies of early modern reading practices to argue that seventeenth-century readers interpreted written works analogically. A. H. Tricomi best articulates this view in his 1986 article, "Philip, Earl of Pembroke, and...
Gertrude on the Block: Writing, Love, and Fame in Stanzas in Meditation
Gertrude Stein once wrote, referring to Alice B. Toklas, that she is "the air of here and there," but I would suggest that the "heir" space Toklas occupies during the composition of Stanzas in Meditation is confined to a single one of Gertrude Stein's...
Plato's Timaeus and the Song of Roland: Remarks on Oxford Bodleian MS Digby 23
Oxford Bodleian MS Digby 23 contains two works, each copied by a different twelfth-century scribe. (1) The first part of the codex is given over to Calcidius' Latin translation of Plato's Timaeus, a learned cosmological treatise which describes the...
Representations of Illegitimacy in Wilkie Collins's Early Novels
Illegitimacy was a prominent political, social, and literary issue throughout the nineteenth century, and is a theme that the sensation novelist Wilkie Collins repeatedly returns to in his fiction. Best remembered for his 1860 novel, The Woman in White,...