Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 76, No. 2, Spring

"Cynewulf and Cyneheard": A Woman Screams
The presence of the woman is not to be overlooked. Sigmund Freud "Cynewulf and Cyneheard" is the entry for 755/757 in The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a historical record compiled during the reign of King Alfred (871-899 C.E.).(1) The 755/757 annal...
"Elegy by W.S.": Another Possible Candidate?
Considerable controversy currently surrounds the authorship of the "Elegy by W. S."(1) Despite the complexity of the debates, however -- which at the moment seems likely to lead to the extraordinary result of producing a Shakespearean work which is canonical...
'Fancies of Exclusive Possession': Validation and Dissociation in Mary Seacole's England and Caribbean
The English essayist William Hazlitt spoke without optimism of travel and its potential consequences. I am one of those who do not think that much is to be gained in point either of temper or understanding by travelling abroad. Give me the true, stubborn,...
Opening the Secret: Marriage, Narration, and Nascent Subjectivity in Middle English Romance
Thow wenist I knowe not thy councelle; But I warn thee I know it every dealle. (264-65)(1) The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnell The fourteenth-century Middle English romance Syr Launfal, based on the earlier lay by Marie de France,...
The Marks of Character: Physiology and Physiognomy in 'Absalom and Achitophel.' (John Dryden Poem)
Unlike the rest of us, poets may choose their forebears. In his literary criticism, Dryden self-consciously patterned his poetic stance on the heritage of Shakespeare, envisioning a traditional line of poets that allowed him to assume a place in the...
The Role of Folk Humor in Seventeenth-Century Receptions of Beaumont's 'The Knight of the Burning Pestle."
Since its first performance at the Blackfriars some time between 1607 and 1609,(1) Francis Beaumont's The Knight of the Burning Pestle has undergone the most radical rehabilitation of any play in the remarkably voluminous Beaumont and Fletcher canon....