Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 84, No. 2, Spring

Bocstafas: A Literal Reading of Exeter Book Riddle 57
A folk riddle collected early last century in Adams County, Illinois challenges the solver: Riddle me, riddle me, rin-e-go, My father gave me some seed to sow. The seed was black, the ground was white, If you are a good scholar, You...
Gulliver, Gulliveriana, and the Problem of Swiftian Satire
Readers have wrangled over the "meaning" of Gulliver's Travels since it was first published in 1726. No critical consensus has ever been reached even on some very fundamental issues of interpretation. What can be done to extricate us from what appears...
Individual Development and the American Autobiography: Franklin, Thoreau, Adams
Much critical commentary on the American autobiography has concentrated on the ways in which American autobiographers have made use of their presentations of an individual's growth and development. One of these uses, we find, was to remind Americans...
Interiors, Exteriors, and the Veiling of Cupid's Martyrs: Gendered Space in the Assembly of Ladies
The Assembly of Ladies is an anonymous fifteenth-century secular love poem. (1) It adheres closely to conventional poetic structures but throws these conventions into relief as it presents its narrative from a woman's point of view, a rare occurrence...
The Origins of Francis Godwin's the Man in the Moone (1638)
INTRODUCTION Francis Godwin (1562-1633), bishop successively of Llandaff and Hereford, wrote what was later regarded as the first piece of English science-fiction, The Man in the Moone, published posthumously in 1638. This pseudonymous work is narrated...