Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 78, No. 3, Summer

A Calendar for Sense and Sensibility
There is a curious lacuna in Jane Austen studies one would have thought had been filled long ago. No-one has as yet drawn out and explained the chronology of Sense and Sensibility. From Austen's other five novels scholars have educed detailed calendars...
Books Received
LANGUAGE Devine, A. M., and Laurence D. Stephens. Discontinous Syntax: Hyperbation in Greek. Oxford U. Press, 2000. Pp. Vii + 348. $45.00. Filppula, Markku. The Grammar of Irish English: Language in Hibernian Style. Routledge/ESA Studies in Germanic...
Censorship and Generic Change: The Case of Satire on the Early Eighteenth-Century London Stage
At the beginning of the eighteenth century, the London theatre world was changing in ways that greatly influenced satiric drama and theatrical censorship for the rest of the century. Traditional state control over the theatres was seriously eroded...
Pascalian Reflections in Les Miserables
Hugo only refers to Pascal by name in the opening chapters of Les Miserables, in the course of his description of Monseigneur Myriel, the Bishop of Digne.(1) Here, Hugo ambivalently calls the seventeenth-century Jansenist both a genius and a madman,...
Smollett's Representation and Critique of the Traffic in Women: A Narrative Strand in Roderick Random
In Congreve's comedy The Way of the World the male protagonist, Mirabell, explains in a notorious speech to his former mistress, Arabella Fainall, why he made her marry Fainall. He recalls to her that at the time he and she both believed that she was...
The Lingua Materna and the Conflict over Vernacular Religious Discourse in Fifteenth-Century England
In late medieval England, the vernacular proved to be an effective medium for those attempting to demystify religious discourse that previously had been coded mainly in clerical Latin.(1) Increasing use of the vernacular posed a double challenge to...