Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 78, No. 4, Fall

Fairy Magic and the Female Imagination: Mary Lamb's "A Midsummer Night's Dream"
During the period between 1806 and 1809, Mary and Charles Lamb coauthored children's literature for William Godwin's Juvenile Library. Tales from Shakespear, designed for the use of Young Persons was issued in two volumes and "embellished with Copper...
Finding the Modern Frames in Tennyson's Final Classical Poems
As a young child, Alfred Tennyson received an education in Greek and Latin literature that was unusually rigorous, even by the standards of the early nineteenth century. In the years before he was sent to Louth Grammar School and later to Trinity College,...
Literary Genealogy, Virile Rhetoric, and John Gower's Confessio Amantis
In one of the most well-known passages of Inferno, Dante unexpectedly encounters the Florentine magistrate, rhetorician and poet, Brunetto Latini, amongst the sodomites in the innermost ring of the seventh circle of Hell. The poignancy of this episode,...
Radical Royalism: Strategy and Ambivalence in Dryden's Tragicomedies
In the following pages, I want to ask what it might mean to call John Dryden, particularly the Dryden who produces the two-plot tragicomedies, a "radical royalist." Christopher Hill has coined this phrase to describe those Restoration writers who embraced...
The Art of Beekeeping Meets the Arts of Grammar: A Gloss of "Columcille's Circle"
Folio 15 verso of British Library manuscript Cotton Vitellius E.xviii, an eleventh-century codex written in all likelihood at Winchester, preserves a short item that begins with the words Pis is sancte columcille circul.(1) The diagram and instructions...