Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 84, No. 3, Summer

Anatomizing the Body Politic: Corporeal Rhetoric in the Maid's Tragedy
1 Nineteenth-century readers--Coleridge most infamously--found in Beaumont and Fletcher's plays benighted characters, prostrate before arcane political notions. The playwrights, mere sensationalists, are supposed to have been "the most servile jure...
"Business for the Lovers of Business": Sir Charles Grandison, Hardwicke's Marriage Act and the Specter of Bigamy
... in the minutiae lie often the unfoldings of the Story, as well as of the heart ... (1) As Samuel Richardson was publishing The History of Sir Charles Grandison, his third and final novel, in 1753 and 1754, Parliament was engaged in the reform...
Corporal Terror: Critiques of Imperialism in the Siege of Jerusalem
In defining the relationship between violence and justice in "The Critique of Violence," Walter Benjamin suggests that violence must be evaluated "within the sphere of means, themselves, without regard for the ends they serve." (1) As Giorgio Agamben...
Tennyson's Balin and Balan as the Reconciliation of the Divided Self: A New Reading of the Final Idylls of the King
W. H. Auden, according to his biographer Humphrey Carpenter, apparently informed his tutor at Oxford at his first tutorial, "'I am going to be a poet.' The tutor, Neville Coghill, replied patronisingly that this was a splendid way to start reading...
"The Cause of Everiche Maladye": A New Source of the Physician's Tale
1 Emerson Brown, in his often cited essay on the Physician's Tale, concluded that an analysis of the narrator's misuse of sources in the tale leads overwhelmingly to the conclusion that the Physician is intellectually challenged. He does not understand...