Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 85, No. 3-4, Summer-Fall

Fenollosa's Legacy: The Japanese Network of Ezra Pound
Ezra Pound's initial understanding of Japan clearly involves Ernest Fenollosa's papers, and Pound's encounter with Fenollosa's work is well known. (1) He met Fenollosa's widow, Mary, in London in 1912; she asked him to become Fenollosa's literary executor;...
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Slavery in the Ottoman (and the British) Empire
Thus far, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's writings about slavery have only been examined in a very limited way. In recent critical work on Montagu's Turkish Embassy Letters, scholars frequently argue that her text represents a feminist departure from previous...
Maternal Rhetoric in Jane Addams's Twenty Years at Hull-House
When Jane Addams (1860-1935) wrote Twenty Years at Hull-House in 1910, she understood autobiographies were deliberate constructions in the sense that an author depicts her identity and events in the text to shape the reader's perception: "It has ......
Mood Imperative: The Cuckoo, the Latin Lyrics, and the "Cuckoo Song"
The twelve-line Middle English rondellus or rota "Sumer is icumen in "--often referred to as the "Cuckoo Song" or the "Summer canon"--is so well known as to be virtually an early British literature institution. (1) In his influential but now out of...
Notes and Documents: Dryden and Dorset in 1692: A New Record
Charles Sackville (1638-1706), known in his youth as Lord Buckhurst and later as Earl of Middlesex and Earl of Dorset, was among John Dryden's earliest patrons. The poet dedicated his Essay of Dramatick Poesie to Buckhurst in 1667, and the two men...
The Language of Urbanization in John Stow's: Survey of London
In the 1580s and 1590s London experienced high inflation, plague outbreaks, and prolonged dearth caused, in part, by the City's phenomenal population explosion in the late sixteenth-century. (1) The Crown and City responded to these conditions with...
The Novelistic Afterlife of Henry Mayhew
Reviews of neo-Victorian novels published between the late 1980s and the present often compare them with fiction of the Victorian period, especially the works of Charles Dickens. In the Sunday Times Anthony Quinn called The Quincunx "A Dickens of a...
The Texture of Emare
The Middle English romances have profited from recent attention to a number of features: their popularity, their social discourse and varied audiences, and, most particularly, their manuscript context in important household anthologies and non-aristocratic...
Toleration and Translation: The Case of Las Casas, Phillips, and Milton
In an appeal against "that bloody Tenent of Persecution for cause of Conscience," Roger Williams, often credited with initiating the debate on the subject in the 1640s, delineated the outer limits of toleration: "By the mercifull Assistance of the...