Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 85, No. 1-2, Spring

Haywood's Re-Appropriation of the Amatory Heroine in Betsy Thoughtless
Although Samuel Richardson's Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded (1740) continues to hold sway over critical accounts of the English novel, scholars have also argued that the influence of amatory fiction was not, in fact, silenced by Pamela's publication....
Henry Constable and the Question of Catholic Poetics: Affective Piety and Erotic Identification in the Spirituall Sonnettes
In the preface to her 1960 edition of Henry Constable's poetry, Joan Grundy contextualizes Constable's Spirituall Sonnettes in relation to post-Tridentine aesthetics by observing that he uses "the sonnet form to express religious experience"; that...
Hermeneutical Perversions: Ralph of Coggeshall's "Witch of Rheims"
In his contribution to the Chronicon Anglicanum, the Cistercian chronicler Ralph of Coggeshall interrupts his account of the preparations made for the Fourth Crusade in 1199 to recount six anecdotes of local marvels and recent miracles. The focus in...
Peacock in Love: Reminiscences of Cecilia Jenkins, an Unknown Victorian Novelist
An editor of literary letters sometimes needs a bit of luck, as well as the persistence of a detective, to track down a "missing person." When I began to collect the letters of Thomas Love Peacock, I naturally wanted to identify the Mrs. Jenkins mentioned...
Reading the Lies of Poets: The Literal and the Allegorical in Machaut's Fonteinne Amoureuse
Li poete qui jadis furent, Qui eulz et le siecle decurent, Dieu le creatour mescrioient Et les creatures crioient, Se fesoient au pueple acroire Tel fiction qui pas n'ert voire. (1) (Ovide Moralise) Much critical attention in...
Revolt in Utica: Reading Cato against Cato
1 One type of speech exchange in particular characterizes Addison's play Cato: it occurs when a character voices an opinion, often of an entirely inoffensive nature, only to be rebuked by a respondent for lapsing from the true mark of political...
The Tempest and the Discontents of Humanism
"Which play / Were we in?" Ted Hughes, "Setebos" (1) Since the peak of postcolonial approaches to Shakespeare's work in the decade between the 1980s and 1990s, The Tempest has been read as a drama of colonial expansion and a play about the subordination...
"With Many a Floryn He the Hewes Boghte": Ekphrasis and Symbolic Violence in the Knight's Tale
From Homer's shield of Achilles to Auden's, ekphrasis, "the verbal representation of visual representation," (1) has featured prominently in Western literature and has inspired an equally rich critical tradition. Throughout this critical history, ekphrasis...