Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 2, Spring

A Reader Writes: Negotiating the Wealth of Nations in an Eighteenth-Century English Commonplace Book
It is not often that the historian has the opportunity to reconstruct the peculiar experiences of past readers. Despite the maturity of book history and the theoretical sophistication latterly attained by the history of ideas, it remains relatively...
De-Gendering Genre: Aphra Behn and the Tradition of English Verse Satire
Satire has traditionally been a masculine genre, with satirists assuming positions of authority and power deemed appropriate to the male gender, and focusing much of their outrage and ridicule on women. Conventional scholarship on British satire...
Infelix Culpa: Milton's Son of God and the Incarnation as a Fall in Paradise Lost
In a sermon written fifty years before the publication of Milton's Paradise Lost, John Donne ruminates that "I must not ask why God took this way to incarnate his Son." (1) Despite the centrality of the concept of the Incarnation in Christian doctrine,...
Introductory and as a Device in Poetry-Making
And can it be, that I should gain An interest in the Saviour's blood? --Charles Wesley, 1738 And did those feet in ancient time Walk upon Englands mountains green[?] --William Blake, 1804 And have the bright immensities received our risen Lord?--Howard...
The "Poetry of Trees" and Wordsworth's New Vision of Pastoral: An Unrecorded Letter
As is well known, Wordsworth (like Dr. Johnson) was averse to cataloguing nature's charms; and yet from "An Evening Walk" onwards, the "dance" of "stately trees" (in Milton's phrase) held a special place in his imagination. Wordsworth loved trees...
"You Think You See a Monk": The Illusions of "Fra Lippo Lippi"
Although he does not sound at all like the Lady of Shallott, Browning's Fra Lippo Lippi does appear to be like her in at least one regard: he, too, seems sick of shadows. Whether they be traces of sportive but inaccessible ladies, the demands of...