Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 90, No. 2-3, Spring-Summer

Afterword: New Studies
I hope I have suggested the epistemological priority of this unfamiliar kind of allegorical vision; bur I must admit that old habits die hard, and that for us such unaccustomed exposure to reality, or to the collective totality, is often intolerable,...
American Cinema and the Southern Imaginary
American Cinema and the Southern Imaginary edited by Deborah E. Barker and Kathryn McKee. Athens, GA: U. of Georgia Press, 2011. Pp. ix + 374. Paper $24.95. The University of Georgia's New Southern Studies series continues to put out books of strong...
Creating the Circum-Caribbean Imaginary: DuBose Heyward's and Paul Robeson's Revision of the Emperor Jones
Despite the strength of nihilism in the West and in the so-called Third World, it is arguable that society is approaching in uncertain degree a horizon of sensibility upon which a capacity exists to begin to transform claustrophobic ritual by cross-cultural...
Faulkner's Literary Historiography: Color, Photography, and the Accessible Past
IN APRIL OF 1935, the Eastman-Kodak company released what would become the most widely recognized color film stock in the world. At the time, Kodachrome was marketed with the burgeoning mass of amateur photographers in mind, a group who would benefit...
Introduction: The New Southern Studies and the New Modernist Studies
This special issue of Philological Quarterly takes its inspiration from he roughly coterminous appearance in the year 2000 of the New Southern Studies (NSS) and the New Modernist Studies (NMS), two academic movements that have through conferences,...
Peripatetic Modernism, or, Joe Christmas's Father
IN SCHOLARLY INTERPRETATIONS of William Faulkner's Light in August (1932), as at the hands of the homicidal Doc Hines, Joe Christmas's father has been quickly dispatched. This lack of commentary corresponds to the novel's narrative focus, since Joe's...
Queer Antiracism and the Forgotten Fiction of Murrell Edmunds, a Southern "Revolutionary"
OVER THE PAST FEW DECADES, critics, historians, and legal scholars have largely treated the struggles for racial equality and for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights as parallel and rather distinct political movements. Needless to say, imagining...
Race and White Identity in Southern Fiction: From Faulkner to Morrison
Race and White Identity in Southern Fiction: From Faulkner to Morrison by John N. Duvall. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press, 2008. Pp. xix + 194. $89. Circumnavigating social, cultural, and normative privilege and their effects in works by notable...
The Foreigner in Yoknapatawpha: Rethinking Race in Faulkner's "Global South"
IN PLESSY V. FERGUSON (1896), one of the most famous Supreme Court cases establishing the division of black and white face in America, Justice John Marshall Harlan was the lone dissenter from the majority decision to uphold a Louisiana statute requiring...
The Poetics of Labor in Jean Rhys's Global Modernism
I'm very lazy you know. Like Christophine.--Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea In his inaugural speech of 10 April 1839 the newly appointed lieutenant governor deplored "the great indolence" of segments of the peasantry which illegally held "as if a matter...
Willa Cather and the Burden of Southern History
The South ... far from being utterly different, is really the essence of the nation. It is not a mutation born by some accident into the normal, lovely American family; it has simply taken the national genes and done the most with them. It contains,...