Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 91, No. 3, Summer

A Latin Model for an Old English Homiletic Fragment
ON THE LAST COMPLETED PAGE (563) of a large collection of Old English homilies in Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 162 (Rochester or Canterbury, beginning of the eleventh century), we find a piece entitled "In die depositionis beati Augustini Anglorum...
An Author and a Bookshop: Publishing Marlowe's Remains at the Black Bear
LET ME SEE, hath anybody in Yarmouth heard of Leander and Hero, of whom divine Musaeus sung, and a diviner Muse than him, Kit Marlow? Two faithful lovers they were, as every apprentice in Paul's Churchyard will tell you for your love, and sell you...
Attribution and Misattribution: New Poems by Robert Browning?
1 ONE MIGHT EXPECT at a poet's two hundredth birthday that the questions as to what he wrote and what he did not write would be settled, but in the case of Robert Browning confusion has persisted in large part because he was married to a poet. He...
Communal Purity and Jewish "Filpe" in Cleanness
THE FOURTEENTH-CENTURY ALLITERATIVE POEM Cleanness depicts episodes of divine vengeance so terrifying that one critic has branded it "the most frightening poem in Middle English." (1) Many scholars agree that the poem's concentration on the dire consequences...
Denmark's Rotting Reconsidered
In memory of Laurel Amtower (1965-2010) LEPROSY FUNCTIONED AS AN EXEMPLARY DISEASE in medieval English culture. To quote Susan Sontag, "the leper was a social text in which corruption was made visible; an exemplum, an emblem of decay." (1) What...
Journey Westward: Joyce, "Dubliners" and the Literary Revival
Journey Westward: Joyce, "Dubliners" and the Literary Revival by Frank Shovlin. Liverpool U. Press, 2012. Pp. ix + 180. $99.95. James Joyce is inextricably linked with Dublin. Born and raised in the east-coast Irish metropolis and capital city,...
Reading and Not Reading "The Man of the Crowd": Poe, the City, and the Gothic Text
HOW MANY THINGS begin with Poe?", Borges asked. The question is of course rhetorical. Posed in an essay called "The Detective Story" (1) it builds up a by-now familiar argument, that, in a few stories written in the early 1840s, (2) Edgar Allan Poe...
Stillness and Noise: The Ambiences of John Donne's Lyrics
JOHN DONNE seems to have remained wonderfully and ruefully attuned to the inevitable power of the external world to distract us from our own thoughts. In a striking example from a funeral sermon preached in 1626, Donne admits the insistence with which...