Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 91, No. 4, Fall

Fairy Magic, Wonder, and Morality in Sir Orfeo
THE CRITICAL HISTORY OF SIR ORFEO is a story of contexts. Because this retelling of the Orpheus legend incorporates elements from medieval discourses, critics have examined multiple frameworks-Celtic, Christian, classical, and historical--in order...
Hans Folz and Print Culture in Late Medieval Germany: The Creation of Popular Discourse
Hans Folz and Print Culture in Late Medieval Germany: The Creation of Popular Discourse by Caroline Huey. London: Ashgate, 2012. Pp. xviii + 166. $99.95. Caroline Huey has written the first extensive English-language study of one of Germany's key...
The Elevation of the Apostles in Cynewulf's Christ II: Ascension
IN THE HOMILY WHICH SERVES AS THE SOURCE FOR Cynewulf's Old English poem Christ II: Ascension, Gregory the Great expounds the standard Gospel pericope for Ascension Sunday, Mark 16:14-20. (1) In this biblical passage, Jesus upbraids the apostles "for...
The Ends of Reading in the Merchant's Tale
SCANDAL INHERES IN THE PERVASIVE, IMPIOUS Biblicism of Chaucer's Merchant's Tale. Lawrence Besserman has tallied over sixty evocations of the Biblical text in the tale, from or concerning every major character in the story, including the pagan gods...
The Unrepentant Renaissance: From Petrarch to Shakespeare to Milton
The Unrepentant Renaissance: From Petrarch to Shakespeare to Milton by Richard Strier. Chicago: U. of Chicago Press, 2011. Pp. xii + 304. $45.00. Richard Strier's The Unrepentant Renaissance begins by claiming that it is "dedicated to discussing...
Translation and the Cronica del Peru: The Voices of Pedro Cieza De Leon
THE LITERARY-HISTORICAL GENRE known as "the chronicle" originated in classical Europe and became very popular in England, France, and Spain in the Middle Ages. D. R. Woolf defines it as an "amorphous term" that refers to "an account of events of the...