Nutrition Health Review

Health magazine (tabloid).

Articles from No. 106, Summer

A Review of Vaccines Used Currently as Noted by Their Makers, and Some of Their Side Effects
Diphtheria A toxoid derived from Corynebacterium diphtheriae exotoxin. * Can cause severe illness with or without fever. * Can cause local irritation and sterile abscess one or two weeks after injection. * Can cause anaphylactic reaction...
Cervical Ripening and Preterm Labor
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Cervical ripening that promotes preterm labor is distinct from what happens at the onset of normal-term labor, researchers have found. The findings challenge the conventional- premise that premature cervical ripening and remodeling...
Cooling Patients in Cardiac Arrest Improves Outcomes
A broad, regional system to lower the temperature of resuscitated cardiac arrest patients at a centrally located hospital was found to improve outcomes. The cooling treatment (therapeutic hypothermia) is effective yet underused, researchers said. ...
Deconstructing the Food Pyramid: An Interview with Susan Levin, M.S., R.D
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Q.: What is the Food Pyramid? A.: The Food Pyramid is a nutritional or food guide. It is one of a handful of guides set forth to the public by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (U.S.D.A.). A food guide is oftentimes a...
Depression and Risk of Stroke in Women
Depressed women may face an increased risk of stroke. In six years of follow-up of women in the Nurses' Health Study, a history of depression was associated with a 29 percent increased risk of total stroke, even after other stroke risk factors were...
Eating Nuts and Peanuts Improves Diabetes Control without Weight Gain
Replacing carbohydrates with 2 ounces of nuts everyday may improve blood glucose levels and blood lipids in patients with type 2 (non-insulin- dependent) diabetes. David Jenkins, M.D., Ph.D., D.Sc., principal investigator and a pioneer in the area...
Eat Well, but Do Not Feed a Cancer Cell
Scientists do not know exactly why cancer develops in one person and not another. Agricultural Research Service scientist Thomas Wang, who specializes in cancer prevention research, says that there are "layers" of factors involved in the development...
E. Coli Organisms: Alive and Well, Probably in a Streambed near You
Escherichia coli is a survivor. It thrives in the gut of mammals and other vertebrates, but it can also live in soil and water and in biofilms that can form on some moist Surfaces. "Even though most E. coli strains don't cause illness, it's an 'indicator...
Human Herpesvirus-6 Invades the Brain through the Nose
It has been discovered that human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) travels along olfactory cells and into the brain after becoming situated in people's nasal mucus. HHV-6 is known as a common cause of the childhood infection roseola, which manifests itself as...
Intensive Statin Therapy and Diabetes
High-dose statin therapy has been linked with a higher incidence of diabetes when compared with moderate-dosage statins, which are used to lower cholesterol levels. However, the cardiovascular benefits of intensive-dose statins are considered a greater...
Liver and Belly Fat May Signify a High Risk of Heart Disease
FINLAND -- Obese people with high levels of abdominal fat and liver fat may face increased risks for heart disease and other serious health problems. Obesity is commonly associated with heart disease risk and cardiometabolic abnormalities, including...
Make Calories Count with Nutrient-Dense Peanuts
The 2010 Dietary Guidelines addressed the American obesity epidemic by advising the public to "maintain calorie balance over time" by consuming nutrient-dense foods such as peanuts. To maintain proper calorie balance, refined grains, solid fats, and...
Narcissists Recognize Their Own Arrogance
Narcissistic people tend to let everyone know around them that they are the best individuals, but studies show that narcissistic people do not see the world through rose-colored glasses. "Narcissistic people, while holding themselves in high regard,...
New Pathway to Potential Therapies for Advanced Prostate Cancer
Researchers at the University of Texas in Dallas have narrowed the potential drug targets for advanced prostate cancer by demonstrating that late-stage tumors are driven by a different hormonal pathway than was thought previously. While testosterone...
Poor Sleep Quality Raises Risk of High Blood Pressure
Reduced slow-wave sleep is a powerful predictor of hypertension in older men. As one of the deeper stages of sleep, it is characterized by non-rapid eye movement (non-REM), a state from which it is difficult to awaken. Slow-wave sleep is represented...
Researchers Unravel Control of Growing Blood Vessels
Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have discovered a basic mechanism by which smooth muscle cells that line blood vessels can grow--sometimes abnormally--suggesting methods of treatment for various coronary diseases....
Signs of Aging and Undetected Blocked Brain Blood Vessels
Many common signs of aging, such as trembling hands, stooped posture, and slowness in walking, may be a result of tiny blocked vessels in the brain that cannot be detected by current technology. Examining brain autopsies of older people, researchers...
Sleep Apnea May Be Linked to Future Dementia
In a study, sleeping disorders appeared to result in cognitive impairment in women. Irregularities in breathing that rob the brain of oxygen during sleep are now being found to endanger a person's ability to think. In a study of women 65 years of age...
Strokes Increase among Women during Pregnancy and Soon Afterward
The stroke rate for pregnant women and those who recently gave birth has increased alarmingly over the past dozen years. Researchers gathered data from a large national database of 5 to 8 million discharged women from 1,000 hospitals and compared the...
Too Little Sleep Can Lead to Too Many Pounds
Sleep is as important to your body as breathing, and when you do not get enough, it can have far-reaching psychological and physical effects, including weight gain. Stick with your daily exercise routine. As long as you are not exercising in the...
Users of Tanning Beds Show Brain Changes and Addiction-Like Behaviors
People who frequently use tanning beds may be spurred by an addictive neurological reward-and-reinforcement trigger, according to a pilot study by researchers at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. This could explain why some...
What Causes Gulf War Syndrome? an Interview with Arnold Mann
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Q.: What is Gulf War syndrome? A.: No one really knows what Gulf War syndrome is, because after 20 years, the underlying mechanism remains a mystery, mostly because of a lack of research funding by the government. What...
Why Hydration Is Important for Losing Weight
Hydration is one of the keys to weight loss. It allows your body to give proper hunger signals while also preventing headaches, detoxifying metabolic by-products, and aiding post-workout rejuvenation and healing. Proper hydration is important because...