Journal of International Affairs

Foreign affairs periodical focuses on policy analysis, including state building and peace operations.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 1, Fall

A Cloth Untrue: The Evolution of Structural Adjustment in Sub-Saharan Africa
On a cloth untrue With a twisted cue And elliptical billiard balls. -Gilbert and Sullivan, The Yeoman of the Guard, 1888 Since 1981, structural adjustment in sub-Saharan Africa has moved from a vehemently contested set of proposals to a widely...
Beyond the Six Veils: Conceptualizing and Measuring Poverty
In this age of progress and economic transformation, a disturbingly vast number of the world's population remain steeped in poverty: The World Bank estimates that the number of the poor, defined as those who live on less than U.S.$1 a day, will continue...
Global Poverty in the Late 20th Century
THE GLOBALIZATION OF POVERTY The late 20th century will go down in world history as a period of global impoverishment marked by the collapse of productive systems in the developing world, the demise of national institutions and the disintegration...
Is Growth Central to Poverty Alleviation in India?
A 1997 World Bank Study has rekindled the debate on whether economic growth is central to poverty alleviation in India. Invoking the main findings of a research project based on household surveys over a 40-year period, the study, India: Achievements...
New Strategies for Microenterprise Development: Innovation, Integration, and the Trickle Up Approach
In the last few years, microenterprise development has become one of the most diverse and dynamic approaches to poverty alleviation, with literally hundreds of programs implemented by a wide range of institutions across the globe. Within the microenterprise...
Poverty: A Denial of Human Rights
Development cooperation is in crisis in the true medical sense: its condition will either improve towards recovery or slide into terminal disease. During 1996, official development assistance (ODA) from Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development...
Poverty Alleviation: Is Economics Any Help? Lessons from the Grameen Bank Experience
Monsoons, floods, cyclones and tornadoes are natural disasters that, throughout history have consistently been linked to life and death in Bangladesh. Is there something wrong with Bangladesh? It appears to be a country existing only to shuttle from...
Poverty and Population Issues: Clarifying the Connections
Slums and shantytowns crowded with children, large families in desperate circumstances--these typical media images from the developing world reinforce the popular belief that poverty and population growth are linked in a direct and obvious way. Most...
Poverty and Reforms: Friends or Foes?
As reforms in economic policy--generally centered on dismantling inward-looking policies on international trade and attracting equity investment--and the privatization of many public-owned enterprises have swept across the developing world, critics...
Poverty, Children and Transition in Kyrgyzstan: Some Reflections from the Field
Compared with other Central Asian countries, Kyrgyzstan, from an early stage, seemed to embrace most openly the recommendations of multilateral institutions to liberalize its economy, promote privatization and move from a planned to a market economy....
Property Rights for the Rural Poor: The Challenge of Landlessness
The debate around the relative roles of markets versus bureaucrats took on renewed life with the end of the Cold War. The public policy debate shifted from focusing on the public sector to emphasizing markets and their ability to innovate, decentralize,...
Reducing Absolute Poverty in China: Current Status and Issues
Since 1978, it is estimated that more than 200 million Chinese have escaped absolute poverty, as a result of Chinese government initiatives, bringing the share of China's total population living in absolute poverty to less than 10 percent,(1) This...
Responding to Poverty in Uganda: Structures, Policies and Prospects(*)
Against nature man can claim no right, but once society is established poverty immediately takes the form of a wrong done to one class by another. The important question of how poverty is to be abolished is one of the most disturbing problems which...
The Cow and the Thing Called "What": Dinka Cultural Perspectives on Wealth and Poverty
God asked man, "Which one shall I give you, Black Man; there is the Cow and the thing called `What,' which of the two would you like?" The man said, "I do not want `What.'" God said, "But `What' is better than the Cow!" The man said, "No." Then God...
The Politics of Marginalization: Poverty and the Rights of the Indigenous People in Mexico
Interviewed on 13 June 1998 by Alina Rocha Menocal for the Journal of International Affairs The Journal spoke with Bishop Samuel Ruiz on 13 June 1998, a week after he resigned as president of the Comision Nacional de Intervencion (CONAI),...
Women and Poverty or Gender and Well-Being?
This article addresses two connected elements of the current consensus on women and poverty: One is the view, in poverty discourses, that women are "the poorest of the poor," and the other is the view, in gender and development (GAD) discourses, that...