Journal of Managerial Issues

This journal provides scholarly information on issues relating to the theory of organizations and the practice of management.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 2, Summer

Does Trust in Top Management Mediate Top Management Communication, Employee Involvement and Organizational Commitment Relationships?
Interpersonal trust can be defined as "the extent to which a person is confident in, and willing to act on the basis of, the words, actions, and decisions of another" (McAllister, 1995: 25). Considerable research has explored the importance of trust...
Elephant and Samurai: Differences between Indian and Japanese Supply Chain Management
Global supply chain management has emerged as a central aspect of corporate strategic planning in many Japanese firms during this decade. As Japanese firms focus on enhancing their core competence and developing global outsourcing/strategic alliances,...
Evaluation of New Business Ideas: Do Gender Stereotypes Play a Role?
In recent years, researchers have given considerable attention to investigating the nature of new venture evaluation--the process through which ideas for potentially profitable new business ventures are assessed (Baron and Ensley, 2006; Chen et al.,...
Organizational Apology and Defense: Effects of Guilt and Managerial Status
Research in public relations and crisis communication (e.g., Coombs, 2004; Hearit, 2006) has shown that following a significant failure, various antecedents, including the likelihood of lawsuits, the organization's reputation, and its history of positive...
The Impact of Sports Participation and Gender on Inferences Drawn from Resumes
In the first stage of the employment selection process, applicants frequently use resumes to showcase their qualifications to the person/s in charge of screening the applicant pool. In some situations, this may be an individual in a formal recruiting...
The Relationship between Organizational/board Characteristics and the Extent of Female Representation on Corporate Boards
Existing research suggests that women are significantly underrepresented in executive positions (Dreher et al., 2011) and in the boardroom of public firms. As noted by Hillman et al. (2007), women made up 37 percent of the U.S. workforce in 2005 but...