Public Administration Review

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 3, May-June

Asian Americans in the Federal Service: Education, Occupational Choice, and Perceptions of Discrimination: A Reply
Christopher Daniel claims that "statistical disparities...shed little light on this issue [job discrimination] because plausible alternatives to the discrimination hypothesis can be formulated." He asserts that differences in linguistic abilities,...
Bureaucracy and Democracy: The Case for More Bureaucracy and Less Democracy
It hasn't been my aim to tell people what to think...I have tried, rather, to tell them how to think -- specifically, of course, about public administration. The United States is facing a serious problem with the interface between its bureaucracy...
Democracy, Bureaucracy, and Hypocrisy Redux: A Search for Sympathy and Compassion
I Dwight Waldo's 1977 Royer lecture advances a cogent and concise statement concerning the fundamental essences of democracy and bureaucracy and, by so doing, demonstrates the intrinsic tensions that exist at the interface of these two concepts....
Diminishing Returns from Statistical Analysis: Detecting Discrimination in Public Employment
In their article, "Asian Americans in the public Service: Success, Diversity, and Discrimination," Kim and Lewis (1994) note that Asian Americans experience discrimination within the federal service, suggest that the problem is pervasive and serious,...
Leadership Turnover, Transaction Costs, and External City Service Delivery
One of the more controversial and contentious issues regarding municipal service delivery in recent years is the decision to contract out, "privatize," or employ some other form of external delivery of particular services. This mode of service delivery...
Political Science and American Public Administration: A Necessary Cleft?
Marcia Lynn Whicker, Ruth Ann Strickland and Dorothy Olshfski in their article, "The Troublesome Cleft: Public Administration and Political Science," argue for a rapprochement between political science and public administration. In their thoughtful...
Responding to the Decline in Public Service Professionalism
Governmental professionalism is declining. There are many more political appointees in the bureaucracy, and the environment has not been supportive or trusting. But public officials can play a role in restoring the environment for professionalism....
Some Anomalies in the Deep History of U.S. Public Administration
The essay that follows can be subtitled "Ignorance, Error and Oddity in our Discourse about Public Administration in the United States." It is in the form of an old-fashioned essay, with few footnotes. After all, Woodrow Wilson's famous essay contains...
Teaching Ethics and Values in Public Administration: Are We Making a Difference?
Moral education, Derek Bok (1990) reminds us, once occupied a central place in the intellectual life of students and professors. Strengthening or building the character of students was part and parcel of academe, at least until World War II. College...
The Defense of Qualified Immunity in Employee Termination Suits: Four Cases from the Federal Courts of Appeal
Public officials at all levels of government in the United States are provided with some degree of immunity from lawsuits filed against them in their official capacity. At the start it is important to understand that immunity from suit only applies...
The Structure of Bureaucratic Decisions in the American States
Bureaucrats have a significant impact on the ways that governmental policies impinge on American citizens. This is particularly true at the state level. Administrators in state agencies have wide latitude to make vital decisions in important public...
The Warfare on and over American Government in Waldonian Perspective
What's happened? Why is my government such a terrible thing? -- Congressman Henry Hyde, remarks on the House floor, April 2, 1996 From the perspective of Waldonian thought, war against American government challenges public administration to preserve...
Understanding the Federal Budget
How do you capture the complexity and breadth of an entity that spends over $1.5 trillion and employs over 4.5 million people? As an initial step in dealing with the challenges presented by the scope and magnitude of the federal government, the U.S....