Public Administration Review

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 6, November-December

A Framework for Evaluating the Government Contracting-Out Decision with an Application to Information Technology
How can government do a better job at contracting out? Steven Globerman and Aidan Vining argue that contracting out is justified only when one can expect to lower the sum of production costs and the costs of managing the relationship [between government...
Assuring Institutional Constancy: Requisite for Managing Long-Lived Hazards
What role do demands for constancy play in the operations of public agencies? Institutional constancy of agencies and firms is discussed as a concept and an increasingly important political requirement for the operation of hazardous systems in the United...
From Institutions to Dogma: Tradition, Eclecticism, and Ideology in the Study of British Public Administration
Has British Public Administration lost its sense of coherent identity? This article describes the major changes of the postwar period. It describes the decline of traditional Public Administration with its distaste for theory, focus on institutions,...
Harmon Responds
More than anything else, the essays by Professors Burke and Cooper illuminate one of the chief barriers to reframing conventional, but nolonger-useful debates between rival philosophical factions. Faced with criticisms of their favored position, representatives...
Human Factors in Adoption of Geographic Information Systems: A Local Government Case Study
How do perceptions, experience, attitudes, and communication behavior of local government employees affect the adoption of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology as an organizational innovation? Nedovic-Budic and Godschalk examine the largely...
Mainframe and PC Computing in American Cities: Myths and Realities
How much can PCs aid city management? This article is based on a 1993 survey that compares computing in cities that use only personal computers (PCs) with computing in cities that use central computer systems. The authors found that claims that PCs would...
Managing System-Wide Change in HIV Prevention Programs: A CDC Perspective
What are the variety and scope of administrative challenges faced by large bureaucratic structures when they implement system-wide change? Specifically, when decision making about priorities for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention programs...
Public Service Ethics: A Global Dialogue
Do divergent values embedded in distinctive cultures satisfactorily explain current directions in public service ethics around the world? The authors draw upon expert observation by government and corporate officials who administer ethics programs, leaders...
Sex on the Docket: Reports of State Task Forces on Gender Bias
Women have fought many political and legal battles against bias in the United States, winning the right to vote, access to jobs and occupations formerly dominated by men, and legal prohibitions against sex-based discrimination. Remarkable progress...
Stop Bashing the Bureaucracy
We live in a time when the federal bureaucracy seems to have reached a new low in public esteem. Bashing it is the order of the day. As might be expected, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has come in for its share of criticism. In...
The Sources of Ethical Decision Making for Individuals in the Public Sector
What was the value in changing ASPA's Code of Ethics? Until recently, the Code of Ethics of the American Society for Public Administration symbolized the confusion in the field rather than its insights. The fine content of the former code was lost in...