Joint Force Quarterly

Articles from Spring-Summer

A New Twist in Unconventional War: Undermining Airpower
The United States remains at war with Iraq. Since the imposition of no-fly zones, Baghdad has developed a new form of strategic response--unconventional operations targeted at air forces. An American-led coalition exercises dominance over the Iraqi...
A Teacher among Bureaucrats-The Legacy of Alvin H. Bernstein. (Commentary)
On March 23 a glittering but somber crowd of active and retired officers from all services, present and former government officials, distinguished academics, and civilians from all walks of life gathered at the National Defense University (NDU) to...
A Word from the Chairman
As I look back on 38 years of service, the central experience for officers of my generation was Vietnam. Americans lost faith in the integrity and professionalism of the military during that conflict. We must never allow the Armed Forces to be placed...
Between Iraq and a Hard Place. (Letters ...)
To the Editor--I basically agree with the critique by Ted Galen Carpenter in "Postwar Strategy: An Alternative View" (JFQ, Winter 00-01) on the U.S. policy of dual containment. The Persian Gulf is a region with friendly nations who do not always share...
Coalition Combat: Supporting South Korean Forces
From 1950 to 1953, with only a partial mobilization, the Army fought in Korea, bolstered its presence in Europe, and organized an air defense artillery system on the homefront. Success in these endeavors depended significantly on the capability of...
Counterattack. (Letters ...)
To the Editor--I appreciated the comments by Eric Michael and Patrick Carroll on my article "Rethinking Army-Marine Corps Roles in Power Projection" (JFQ, Autumn 00), which appeared in your last issue. But neither addressed my central focus: advocating...
Disaster at Inchon. (the Korean War from the Other Side)
In response to the communist invasion of South Korea in June 1950, the U.N. Security Council (with the Soviet representative absent from the chamber in protest) approved Resolution 84, which made the United States executive agent for military operations....
End Game. (the Korean War from the Other Side)
By 1951, Stalin recognized that his support for the Korean War was a disaster. The United States and its allies in Europe, galvanized by communist aggression in Asia, expanded NATO capabilities while lending sufficient support to carry on U.N. operations...
Epilogue: Korea and the American Way of War
The past just is not what it used to be. Once we believed that 54,000 Americans died in the Korean War, but we have learned that slippery math and double-counting swelled that death toll by 18,000. Perhaps that should make the war seem less terrible;...
Escape by Sea: The Hungnam Redeployment
The two great military extractions from the beach of the 20th century occurred at Dunkerque in 1940 and Hungnam in 1950. In both cases a large number of troops were withdrawn in the face of superior enemy strength. And although they are often invoked...
General David Monroe Shoup (1904-1983) Commandant of the Marine Corps: Vita. (of Chiefs and Chairmen)
Born in Battle Ground, Indiana; graduated from DePauw University (1926); attended basic school in Philadelphia with temporary duty assignments both at home and in Tientsin (1926-28); served at Quantico, Pensacola, and San Diego (1928-29); assigned...
Non-Lethal Weapons: A Progress Report
Most advanced states have begun exploring the integration of non-lethality in their militaries, and many have elaborate programs to develop the weaponry and operational concepts to use them. Although the evolution of technology facilitates the development...
Operation Chromite: Counterattack at Inchon
The planning and execution of Operation Chromite by General Douglas MacArthur in 1950 established the operational art that guides U.S. joint operations today. The Inchon invasion was one of the best operational-level case studies in the recent past....
Reassessing Joint Experimentation. (out of Joint)
Joint experimentation has reached a juncture. U.S. Joint Forces Command (JFCOM) is the focal point for joint experimentation and implementing concepts found in Joint Vision 2020. While the command has embraced these tasks as its preeminent mission,...
Remembering the Forgotten War
In June 1950, some 135,000 North Korean troops attacked South Korea, sparking a bitter struggle that many have called the "Forgotten War." While it may have been forgotten by some, it certainly was not by the soldiers, sailors, marines, airmen, and...
SOCOM Essay Contest. (Education)
U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) has announced the second annual Special Operations Forces Essay Contest, which solicits innovative concepts on Special Operations Forces (SOF) doctrine, training, education, employment, organization, and technologies....
Special Operations Forces after Kosovo
To many observers the NATO air campaign against Serbia in the spring of 1999 represents the future face of war. The long-distance, high-tech application of force is an attractive template as the United States and other nations become ever more casualty-averse....
Strategy and Force Structure in an Interwar Period
The contemporary era does not represent a strategic pause, but rather an interwar period, and history suggests that the next significant conflict will not be as distant as many would believe. Since 1648 major powers have engaged in a full-scale war...
The Air Campaign over Korea: Pressuring the Enemy
The staff of Far East Air Forces (FEAF) conducted the first systematic study of measures to produce a negotiated settlement in a limited war through airpower some fifty years ago. As both the conflict and truce talks continued, stalemate on the ground...
The Battle Begins. (the Korean War from the Other Side)
Following World War II, Korea was divided into two zones of occupation along the 38th Parallel. The United States occupied the southern zone while the north was controlled by the Soviet Union. When no solution to the issues of reunification emerged,...
The Dragon Strikes Back. (the Korean War from the Other Side)
As U.N. forces advanced north during autumn 1950, the United States concluded that the Chinese leadership was preoccupied with consolidating control over its country and would not intervene in Korea for fear that the fragile Chinese economy could not...
The Icarus Syndrome: The Role of Air Power Theory in the Evolution and Fate of the U.S. Air Force
by Carl H. Builder New Brunswick: Transaction Press, 1998 299 pp. $44.95 [ISBN: 1-56000-141-0] America's Pursuit of Precision Bombing, 1910-1945 by Stephen L. McFarland Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997. 312 pp. $19.95 [ISBN: 1-56098-784-7]...
The Marine Air-Ground Team at the Chosin Reservoir
The Marine air-ground team proved its metal in set piece battles during the Korean conflict, including both the defense of the Pusan Perimeter and support of amphibious operations at Inchon. But the maneuver phase of the war presented a new set of...
The National Guard at War
During two global conflicts the National Guard mobilized and provided both ground and air capabilities to defeat totalitarian powers in Europe and Asia. Its contribution reflected the American reliance on citizen-soldiers who serve their states and...
To the Yalu and Back
The Korean War is a case study in operational art, not only historically but as a paradigm for U.S. strategic thinking. General Douglas MacArthur was the last operational level commander until the Persian Gulf War in 1990-1991. (1) Paradoxically, operational...
War.com: The Internet and Psychological Operations
Cyberspace clickskrieg represents a dramatic shift in strategic thinking that changes the way we took at war. As an information medium and vehicle of influence, the Internet is a powerful tool in open societies as well as others where the only glimpse...