MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 3, Fall

"A Chinese Ishmael": Sui Sin Far, Writing, and Exile
Our destination is fixed on the perpetual motion of search. Fixed in its perpetual exile. Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Dictee Errant Storytelling In the beginning of her personal memoir, "Leaves from the Mental Portfolio of an Eurasian,"...
"A Distinct Place in America Where All Mestizos Reside": Landscape and Identity in Ana Castillo's Sapogonia and Diana Chang's the Frontiers of Love
At the very root of the concept of an American nationality lies the myth of a limitless frontier that unites with unconstrained mobility as an essence of freedom, both physical and spiritual. Early American literature recreated that sense of ceaseless...
An Interview with Montserrat Fontes
Montserrat Fontes is a novelist, screenwriter, journalist, and teacher who was born in Laredo, Texas. When she was nine years old, she moved to Los Angeles to live with her maternal grandmother. She received her B.A. and an M.A. in Comparative Literature...
From Alienation to Reconciliation in the Novels of Cristina Garcia
In Life on the Hyphen: The Cuban-American Way (1995), Gustavo Perez Firmat speaks of the "1.5 ers," that generation of Cuban-Americans who were children at the time of migration, but grew into adults in the United States. (1) They feel fully comfortable...
Not Enough of the Past: Feminist Revisions of Slavery in Octavia E. Butler's Kindred
Haile Gerima's 1993 film Sankofa confronts the legacies of slavery, highlighting the ways the past constructs the present, by cinematically transporting its viewers to that era of human bondage. Indeed, the word sankofa is an Akan word that means "one...
Piri Thomas: An Interview
Born in Harlem in 1928, Piri Thomas was a child of the Depression. His mother was a light-skinned Cuban; his father a Puerto Rican whose darker complexion Thomas alone of all the children inherited. The cruel racism that he experienced within his own...
"Precious Possessions Hidden": A Cultural Background to Ronyoung Kim's Clay Walls
In the middle of the twentieth century Korea was officially divided into two countries. (1) This was done without input from a legitimate Korean government and without consent of the Korean people. The halving of Korea was the cataclysmic finale to...
Shipping the Self to America: The Perils of Assimilation in Glatshteyn's and Shapiro's Immigration Novels
Much of the critical evaluation of United States immigration novels has overlooked the multitude of works that are written in languages other than English. In fact, with the exception of a few recent and notable books, discussions of immigrant narratives...
The Convent as Colonist: Catholicism in the Works of Contemporary Women Writers of the Americas
Writing about the complex relationship between Christian religions and third-world countries in Women and Christianity: A Map of the New Country, Sara Maitland argues that Christianity has frequently been a special vehicle of oppression, but it has...
"The Short Way of Saying Mexicano": Patrolling the Borders of Mario Suarez's Fiction
Literary critics agree that Mario Suarez's fiction holds an important place in the history of Chicano/a literature. Charles Tatum argues that Suarez's colorful vignettes of postwar life in Tucson "bridge the transition between the Mexican American...