MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 3, Fall

"A Broken and Bloody Hoop": The Intertextuality of 'Black Elk Speaks' and Alice Walker's 'Meridian.'(Intertextualities)
In an interview she gave in 1973, later published in In Search of Our Mother's Gardens, Alice Walker talked about a vision shared by Native and African Americans: "If there is one thing African Americans and Native Americans have retained of their...
Authorizing Female Voice and Experience: Ghosts and Spirits in Kingston's 'The Woman Warrior' and Allende's 'The House of the Spirits.'(Intertextualities)
Authors have long woven supernatural elements into their fiction for a variety of reasons: to heighten suspense, enhance setting, or complicate plot. The use of the supernatural, however, can also reveal alternative experiences that formal realism...
Dancing out of Form, Dancing into Self: Genre and Metaphor in Marshall, Shange, and Walker
Western culture has typically seen dance as an empowering activity, offering a forum for individual self-expression, or acting like a religious ritual that binds the community and spiritually renews the individual. In literature, the dance for centuries...
Finding Lost Generations: Recovering Omitted History in 'Winter in the Blood.'(Intertextualities)
It is the wintry wind of a common history blowing outside Yellow Calf's house in James Welch's Winter in the Blood, a wind being translated to mean a kind of life. For the narrator, the gust evokes images of the old man's story just told to him --...
Kerouac's 'The Subterraneans': A Study of "Romantic primitivism."(Intertextualities)
In a review of Jack Kerouac's 1958 novel, The Subterraneans, poet/ critic Kenneth Rexroth said. "The story is all about jazz and Negroes. Now there are two things Jack knows nothing about -- jazz and Negroes" (Nicosia 568). Whatever the source of...
Naming Reality in Native American and Eastern European Literatures
Timothy Laskowski University of Montana This morning the snow, The soft distances Beyond the trees In which nothing appeared -- Nothing appeared -- The several silences, Imposed one upon another, Were unintelligible. I was therefore ill at ease When...
The Chicano Translation of Troy: Epic Topoi in the Novels of Rudolfo A. Anaya
"Homo fuge! Whither should I fly??" (Faustus II, i, 77) "How has it come to pass that a people can hold So long in their memories marvels of things As resplendent as the deeds that did the Trojans in bold battle?"(1) The Trojan war spawned the...
Toward a New Order: Shakespeare, Morrison, and Gloria Naylor's 'Mama Day.' (Toni Morrison)(Intertextualities)
In 1987, Barbara Christian asserted that important African American literature is suffering critical neglect by an academy preoccupied with developing literary theory; her specific examples included the works of Frances Harper, Alice Walker (with...