MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 1, Spring

Disabling la Frontera: Disability, Border Subjectivity, and Masculinity in "Big Jesse, Little Jesse" by Oscar Casares
More than a century after the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Chicano public intellectual Americo Paredes described the violent 1848 redrawing of the US-Mexico borderline in the following terms: "The river, which had been a focal point,...
Editor's Introduction: Transgressing the Borders of "America"
All the lives I could live, all the people I will never know, never will be, they are everywhere. That is all that the world is. --Aleksandar Hemon (2) As a mestiza I have no country, my homeland cast me out; yet all countries are mine because...
Narrative Coyotes: Migration and Narrative Voice in Sandra Cisneros's Caramelo
And I realize with all the noise called "talking" in my house, that talking that is nothing but talking, that is so much a part of my house and my past and myself you can't hear it as several conversations, but as one roar like the roar inside a shell,...
Oscar "Zeta" Acosta's American Odyssey
By the time Oscar "Zeta" Acosta's The Autobiography of a Brown Buffalo was published in 1972, a number of narratives had already employed the road trip to explore the chaotic 1960s American culture and traverse national and international boundaries...
Recollecting, Repeating, and Walking Through: Immigration, Trauma, and Space in Mary Antin's the Promised Land
I was born, I have lived, and I have been made over. Is it not time to write my life's story? I am just as much out of the way as if I were dead, for I am absolutely other than the person whose story I have to tell. --Mary Antin, The Promised Land...
"The Breath Is Alive / with the Equal Girth of Words": Tino Villanueva in Interview
"In my head / was a roaring of light." The phrase appears in "The 8 O'Clock Movie" (16), an opening poem in Tino Villanueva's collection Scene from the Movie GIANT (1993). The speaker uses it to describe the 1973 experience of re-seeing a black-and-white...
The Making of an American: Counternarration in Louis Adamic's Laughing in the Jungle and Anzia Yezierska's Bread Givers
The American public was saturated with anti-immigrant rhetoric during the 1920s. (1) Anzia Yezierska's novel Bread Givers (1925), written one year after the passing of the Johnson-Reed Immigration Act, is often read against this historical backdrop....
When the First World Becomes the Third: The Paradox of Collapsed Borders in Two Novels by Gabriela Aleman
There are concrete reasons why students of American literature or Latino/a studies may not have read either of Gabriela Aleman's two novels: neither has been translated into English and Aleman does not fit into pre-established categories of either...
Writing from the Margins of the Margins: Michael Gold's Jews without Money and Claude Mckay's Home to Harlem
Published just two years apart, Michael Gold's Jews Without Money (1930) and Claude McKay's Home to Harlem (1928) both depict, in colorful and often lurid detail, the underbelly of New York City's two most famous "ethnic" neighborhoods. (1) While Gold's...