MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 4, Winter

A MELUS Interview: Diana Chang
Diana Chang is a native New Yorker, but she spent her early childhood in China, raised by her Eurasian mother and Chinese father. She returned to New York, where she attended high school and then Barnard College. After graduation, she worked full-time...
Becoming Afrekete: The Trickster in the Work of Audre Lorde
Audree Lorde ends her autobiographical work Zami by [r]ecreating in words the women who helped give me substance: Ma-Liz, DeLois, Louise Briscoe, Aunt Anni, Linda, and Genevieve; MawuLisa, thunder, sky, sun, the great mother of us all; and...
John Fante's 'Ask the Dust': A Border Reading
In John Fante's 1939 novel Ask the Dust, protagonist Arturo Bandini struggles with the shifting agenda of a young man simultaneously reviling and reveling in his Italian-American upbringing and asserting himself as a participant in the California success...
Michael Gold's 'Hoboken Blues': An Experiment That Failed
Hoboken Blues: or The Black Rip Van Winkle: A Modern Negro Fantasia on an Old American Theme by Michael Gold, author of Jews Without Money (1930), is an almost forgotten American play. Gold hoped to have the Provincetown Players in New York City produce...
"Orbiting": Bharati Mukherjee's Kaleidoscope Vision
"Orbiting," the story I discuss here, is included in a collection entitled Braided Lives. This title evokes an image of the interweaving of diverse points of view to create a new perspective that is neither wholly like nor wholly different from the...
Text as Trickster: Postmodern Language Games in Gerald Vizenor's 'Bearheart.' (Maskers and Tricksters)
The trickster narrative situates the participant audience, the listeners and readers, in agonistic imagination: there, in comic discourse, the trickster is being, nothingness and liberation; a loose seam in consciousness; that wild space over...
Walt Whitman's Presence in Maxine Hong Kingston's 'Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book.' (Maskers and Tricksters)
In this essay, I will attempt to examine and evaluate the "presence" of Walt Whitman in Maxine Hong Kingston's 1989 novel, Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book. The Whitmanian presence is discernible via a character analysis of the protagonist (Wittman...