MELUS

A journal concentrating on multi-ethnic American literature for the academic audience.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 3, Fall

"A Being of a New World:" the Ambiguity of Mixed Blood in Pauline Johnson's "My Mother"
Studying mixed-blood/Metis history reveals that an overwhelming number of unions between Europeans and Native people happened between a European man and a Native woman. Sylvia Van Kirk has illustrated this demographic pattern in her work on the...
Ceremonial Healing and the Multiple Narrative Tradition in Louise Erdrich's Tales of Burning Love
In the opening scenes of Tales of Burning Love, two characters sit in a bar telling each other stories and discussing healing remedies for toothache. June, a Chippewa woman, suggests to Jack, the victim of a particularly painful tooth, that he try...
Coyote Loops: Leslie Marmon Silko Holds a Full House in Her Hand
At Hopi he could get a fresh start; he could tell people about himself while they looked at the photos in the plastic pages of his wallet. --Leslie Marmon Silko (Storyteller 260) It wasn't until I began this book that I realized that the photographs...
Finding a Place for David Cusick in Native American Literary History
Though David Cusick was one of the first Iroquois to record the oral literature of his nation in the alphabetic writing of Western civilization, contemporary Iroquois do not necessarily receive his work with praise. For instance, Seneca-Wyandot...
Finding the Way Back: Place and Space in the Ecological Poetry of Joy Harjo
Most of us recognize, intuitively if by no other means, that much of the nature poetry being written today is different from that produced by traditional nature poets such as Wordsworth or Whitman. When we read Gary Snyder's description of commercial...
Leslie Marmon Silko: Reading, Writing, and Storytelling
Running on the Edge of the Rainbow: Laguna Stories and Poems, a video film issued in 1978 by the University of Arizona as part of the series Native Literature from the American Southwest, features a combination of storytelling and poetry reading...
On Cultural Contexts, Aesthetics, and the Mission of MELUS
Presidential Address April 13, 2002 MELUS 2002 Conference Seattle, Washington A week ago I was on the phone with a colleague. We were discussing the final touches for this MELUS conference and, somehow, our conversation moved toward our respective...
Postmodern Bears in the Texts of Gerald Vizenor
Most of the commentary on Gerald Vizenor's fiction focuses upon trickster and the post-modern implications of Vizenor's texts; however, bears and their meaning within the Chippewa (1) oral tradition and religion appear often and directly in Vizenor's...
Sherman Alexie's Indigenous Blues
The blues speak histories that, from the conventional perspective, originate in the experiences of Africans in America. But invariably the blues exceed distinct, rigid cultural boundaries. Ralph Ellison's famous definition of the blues suggests...
The Future of Native American Literature: A Conversation with John E. Smelcer
Certainly the popularity of multiculturally based literature has enriched, broadened, and challenged traditional Western understanding of the human condition, particularly in the relationship between humans and the physical and spiritual world....
Word as Weapon: Visual Culture and Contemporary American Indian Poetry
Poetry is revolutionary. It must be to survive. --Lance Henson (Cheyenne) In Sherman Alexie's novel Indian Killer, Marie Polotkin, a Spokane college student, explains to her Wannabe-Indian professor, for whom the Ghost Dance stands as a "beautiful,...