Estudios Irlandeses - Journal of Irish Studies

Articles from No. 5, Annual

A Feminism of Their Own? Irish Women's History and Contemporary Irish Women's Writing
It is possible to recognise the "foundations of Irish culture--state control of women's reproduction, and the nationalist and religious mythologies, Virgin Mary and Mother Ireland--that have framed and, therefore, limited Irish women" (Moloney 2003:...
"A Fusillade of Question Marks": (Re)presenting the Present or the Poet as a Chronicler in the Irish for No by Ciaran Carson
The present has no duration. The past and future do not exist (Ciaran Carson, Shamrock Tea) The Irish for No dates back to the 1980s, and was thus composed within the context of 'The Troubles', after an interval of about a decade during which...
A Woman Leaving Twice to Arrive: The Journey as Quest for a Gendered Diasporic Identity in Anne Devlin's after Easter
Global mobility, a widespread phenomenon of our era, tends to implicate vast numbers of people in large-scale migrations between regions, countries and even continents, making them face the sense of being uprooted and the concomitant need to remould...
Being Digital-Irish Cinema and Digital Production
Within Europe (for which read the European Commission), new technology has long been identified, if admittedly in a somewhat vague fashion, as a potential means of reversing a century of US dominance of global screens. From its inception as a pilot...
Comparative Literature in Ireland and Worldwide an Interview with Professor Declan Kiberd
Q: I was wondering if we could talk a little bit about Comparative Literature generally. Comparative Literature has been called an 'indiscipline' rather than a discipline per se. It's a very loose area. So my first question to you is: what are the...
Donal Donnelly: An Appreciation
Donal Donnelly was born in Bradford, Yorkshire, on July 6th in 1931, and died in Chicago on January 4th 2010. Shortly after his birth however, Donnelly's family moved back to their native Ireland where he first made his mark as a performer. He began...
Elizabeth Bowen, Modernism, and the Spectre of Anglo-Ireland
Literary modernism has been stereotyped as essentially apolitical, turning inward to focus on the psychological construction of the subject and elevating an aesthetic ideology that venerates Art as a self-enclosed, unitary end. Critical discussions...
Helen
Helen (Christine Molloy and Joe Lawlor, 2008) One of the 2009's better received films, Helen, is a work largely funded and shot in Britain, but directed by ex-pat Dubliners Christine Molloy and Joe Lawlor, and with a fair degree of Irish money and...
Irish Film and Television 2009
At the launch of the 2008 annual Irish Film Board Review--complete with flowing wine, a lavish publication and complementary DVD compilation (Irish Talent on Film Vol. V)--CEO Simon Perry, still recalling the success of Once--stated that there had...
Irish Studies in Spain-2009
Introduction Huir del laberinto. Crecer en Irlanda del Norte. Una mirada literaria (2009) Esther Aliaga-Rodrigo Cuentos populares irlandeses (2008) Jose Manuel de Prada-Samper (ed.) Beber para contarla (2009) Peter Haining (ed.) Dickon el diablo...
Jasmine and Lagarto: Pearse Hutchinson's Poetry of Spain
Many Irish poets have engaged with a wider European landscape, poetic, linguistic, historical, metaphorical: we think of people like Denis Devlin, Michael Hartnett, Eva Bourke, Gabriel Rosenstock, Eilean Ni Chuilleanain and Michael Smith, to name a...
"Looking at the Stars": TV3 Adapts Lady Windermere's Fan
As any film student will tell you, in the last years of the 19th century the technical innovations of Etienne-Jules Marey, George Eastman, Thomas Edison and many others produced a scientific curiosity without any definite application, the motion picture....
Masks and Faces: Identities
Masks and Faces: Identities (Vittoria Colonna, 2008) While the absence of a live-action feature from the Dublin Critics' Circle "Irish films of 2009" (1) was a telling comment on the quality of Irish fiction features that were released last year,...
Migration, Masculinity and the Fugitive State of Mind in the Irish Emigrant Footballer Autobiography: The Case of Paul McGrath
In recent years the 'confessional' autobiography has varied the hitherto notoriously banal professional football biography in Britain (Whannel 2002). Co- or 'ghost-written' 'autobiographies' of such former emigrant Irish or Irish descended international...
Monological Drama to Reshape the Northern Irish Identity: A Night in November by Marie Jones
First produced in August 1994 by DubbelJoint at the Belfast Institute of Further Education, A Night in November by Marie Jones (1951-) highlights a man's personal psychological identity quest. It stages a unique single character, Kenneth McCallister,...
Myth and Murder in the Daisy Chain
Myth and Murder in The Daisy Chain (Aisling Walsh, 2009) Aisling Walsh's latest film The Daisy Chain (Walsh 2008) is a complex exploration of the human potential for evil. Martha (Samantha Morton) and Tomas Conroy (Steven Mackintosh), an urbanite...
Ondine
Ondine (Neil Jordan, 2009) Ondine is Neil Jordan's sixteenth feature film--and his eight set in Ireland. One of a number of smaller, personal films by Jordan, it is a muted, elliptical fable that, while growing out of a number of dark folk-tales,...
Reflections on Irish Writing in 2009
2009 has been a year for reflection, filtered in part through the publication of letters and correspondence. A year ago I was writing about the economic downturn, but this has now been augmented by the loss of something as profound. Ireland is facing...
Savage Sounds
Savage Sounds (Brendan Muldowney, 2009) Savage, the debut feature by Brendan Muldowney, follows a photographer, Paul (Darren Healy), who is brutally mugged in an apparently random attack, and his eventual descent into brutal revenge killing. The...
"She Had to Start Thinking like a Man": Women Writing Bodies in Contemporary Northern Irish Fiction
Studies of representations of the body in literature have become so well established as to no longer require extensive explanation or justification of exploring the body as a mode of criticism but, nevertheless, the choice to apply this particular...
Sketching Success: Brown Bag Films Go to the Oscars
The first decade of the new Millennium witnessed a number of noteworthy accomplishments for the Irish audiovisual industry. The greatest success of all however has undoubtedly been the considerable growth experienced by the Irish animation sector....
Square-Toed Boots and Felt Hats: Irish Revolutionaries and the Invasion of Canada (1848-1871)
On 12 April 1866 The Brooklyn Daily Eagle released a third edition of the day's issue with the following hurried report from Calais, on the border between the state of Maine and New Brunswick: There was much excitement yesterday and last night...
"Suspended between the Two Worlds": Gestation Metaphors and Representations of Childbirth in Contemporary Irish Women's Poetry
Introduction The representation of childbirth in writing is challenging, due, on the one hand, to a tradition that has appropriated simplified images of gestation and birth to describe the writer's creative process and, on the other hand, because...
The Finite Televisual Narrative: Pure Mule, the Last Weekend
The Finite Televisual Narrative: Pure Mule, The Last Weekend (RTE, 2009) It is testament to the vast ideological scope of television within the imagined community, and its central position relating to the dissemination and manipulation of ideas,...
"The Old Illusion of Belonging": Distinctive Style, Bad Faith and John Banville's the Sea
John Banville's novels have been repeatedly hailed as the works of a master of language and a literary stylist and his thirteenth novel The Sea (2005) is no exception. One need only look to reviewers' emphasis on the quality of the novel's prose and...
The Teaching of Book-Keeping in the Hedge Schools of Ireland
Introduction Relative to other developed countries, very little has been published on Irish accounting history, and specifically on the history of Irish accounting education. Indeed, for many years, the only substantial work in this area was Robinson's...
The Yellow Bittern
The Yellow Bittern (Alan Gilsenan, 2009) As a documentary, The Yellow Bittern, subtitled The Life and Times of Liam Clancy, navigates the territory between the empirically researched and tantalisingly lyrical; as interviews, archived footage and...
Troubles Cinema: Five Minutes of Heaven
Troubles Cinema: Five Minutes of Heaven (Oliver Hirschbiegel, 2009) & Fifty Dead Men Walking (Kari Skogland, 2008) Two very different films appeared in 2009 to remind us that Troubles cinema has not gone away. Canadian Kari Skogland, who works...