Americas (English Edition)

Articles from Vol. 48, No. 6, November-December

Antigua's Old Mills Turn with New Winds
On a gentle rise above Hatton, Antigua, stands a broken sugar mill. It looms in weary silence, lichen and mosses spreading like an ancient plague across its limestone walls, vines burrowing through fissures in its crumbling mortar. No sails are left...
Aquatic Attractions on Dominican Shores
Although the island of Hispaniola is surrounded by some of the richest aquatic life to be found in the greater Caribbean, until recently an opportunity to experience up close the marvels of the sea was an impossibility for the eight million citizens...
Arts Fellows in the Spotlight
When future historians write the history of the Summit of the Americas with regard to politics and economics, they'll have to analyze the lively arts too. The Fellowships of the Americas grants, inaugurated at the Summit by James D. Wolfensohn, chairman...
Augusto Roa Bastos: Outwitting Reality
Augusto Roa Bastos, Paraguay's preeminent writer, is one of the most complex and gifted writers of the post-Boom generation of Latin American novelists. An unassuming individual who has labored much of his career in relative obscurity, he characterizes...
Bootero's Bounty Comes to Washington
On September 24, nineteen monumental bronze sculptures by the Colombian artist Fernando Botero were installed along the north side of Constitution Avenue, between 15th and 18th streets, as part of the twentieth-anniversary celebration of the Art Museum...
Ernesto Lecuona: The Chopin of the Tropics
It could have been an artfully contrived scene from one of the 1940s-era Hollywood films for which he wrote music scores, but in the fascinating, real-life world of Ernesto Lecuona, it was just one more memorable incident that would become part of the...
Global Politics of Pesticides
We have subjected enormous numbers of people to contact with these poisons, without their consent and often without their knowledge. Many Pesticides, now banned in their countries of manufacture because of adverse health and environmental effects, increasingly...
Lost Land of Water and Rock
Just south of the Orinoco, Venezuela's ancient Guiana Highlands rise abruptly, extending across half of the country. Centuries of erosion have given rise to plateaus heavily etched by swiftly moving streams and rivers. The country's major waterways--the...
Speaking with Botero
How did you know you wanted to be an artist? I began to paint--and I already knew I wanted to be an artist--when I was thirteen or fourteen Years old I have some watercolors from those days in which I was painting volumetric forms even I before I knew...
Spinning Threads of Progress
At the entrance to a long, concrete shed surrounded by high; green mulberry bushes, Kee Wook Sohn dons Chinese slippers. He skirts a narrow, wooden tub squirming with fat, white silkworms, passes a room of Colombian scientists, and glides towards a climate-controlled...
The Presses Roll in Colonial Times
IN THE AMERICAS, THE STORY OF THE INTRODUCTION OF PRINTING BEGAN IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY, AND CONTINUED FOR THREE HUNDRED YEARS. WITH SOME DRAMATIC EPISODES--SUCH AS THE PORTUGUESE ROYAL FAMILY'S ARRIVAL IN BRAZIL, WITH PRINTING...
The Real Profits of Village Banking
Low-income women in Cuatemala are gaining financial and personal freedoms with the assistance of an international mircolending organization Before dawn Liliana Matias rises to prepare the corn. She washes it and mashes it into dough. Then she carries...
Trailing Anza
Against the dark highway sign, four figures emerge from a stylized, white triangle. An American Indian strides beside a Spanish horseman. At a distance, ride a priest and a woman holding a child. Around the perimeter of the triangle, the words "Juan...