The Saturday Evening Post

The Saturday Evening Post is a bi-monthly magazine published by The Benjamin Franklin Literary and Medical Society in Indianapolis, Ind. Founded in 1728, it's a general interest magazine with a focus on health. Its readership is the general population.

Articles from Vol. 281, No. 2, March-April

Andy Frank and the Power of the Plug: A Mild-Mannered Engineering Professor Is out to Save the World with a Plug-In Hybrid Car That Travels Up to 100 Miles before Using Fossil Fuel
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Professor Andy Frank has a question for you: What if there were a full-size sedan or sports utility vehicle (SUV) that performed like a sports car, cut gasoline consumption and greenhouse gas emissions by 90 percent, burned...
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An Unexpected Life: A Long-Anticipated European Vacation Celebrating Retirement Was Put on Hold and Replaced with a Never-Ending Journey Called Autism
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] My husband, Tom, placed three letters on the table. The first was a payoff notification from the bank. After 30 years of monthly payments, the house was finally ours. The second contained the finalization of Tom's retirement...
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Eggs for Easter Brunch: Dishes That Say Spring
"Pure and simple, there are few" things as magnificent as eggs, the famous chef James Beard once enthused. Come Easter time, eggs are in their element, adding gaiety to Easter baskets and a springtime feel to meals. The possibilities are endless, with...
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Going Green with Sara Snow: The Genial and Popular Young Television Host, Author, and Columnist Is on a Mission to Spread the Gospel of "Green Living."
In her 90-year-old, colonial-style Indianapolis home, Sara Snow easily rattles off how she religiously follows the tenets of green living. Dressed in pants made of wood pulp and an organic cotton shirt, this up-and-coming eco-friendly expert is among...
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Hooked on Rugs: What Began as a Craft Born of Thrift and Necessity Has Evolved into an Art Form
Country women, mostly from New England and the maritime provinces of Canada, began weaving (hooking) strips of tattered wool blankets and clothing into the burlap from feed sacks in the mid-18th century. Unlike the more affluent city folk, they couldn't...
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Living Works of Art: You Don't Have to Be a Master Gardener to Appreciate-And Enjoy-The Ancient Craft of Espalier
It's a centuries-old horticultural technique with roots as far back as ancient Egypt. There, through faded tomb paintings of fig trees planted and flattened against sun-drenched stone walls, evidence suggests that espalier (ess-PAL'-yay) had a place...
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Lobbying Efforts: Inside the Grandest Entrances in America: Call It the "Surprise Inside." Sometimes the Most Unassuming Buildings Conceal the Most Astonishing Lobbies-Whimsical, Wonderful, and Completely Unexpected. Here Are Nine Show-Stoppers Worth a Special Trip
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] CURTIS CENTER Philadelphia's art collections stack up with the best of them, but one of the city's most prized art treasures isn't in a museum or gallery. Instead, it graces the lobby of the Curtis Center office building--once...
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No Talking in the Library! Have You Noticed How Libraries Aren't Hushed and Reverent Places Anymore?
The other day I decided to pay a visit to the library. You know, that spot that people often confuse with the video store, but which also has books? I was there to take out War and Peace. It's very long, so I thought I'd read the "War" part immediately...
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The Advantage of Vintage: The Outdated Outfits Hanging in Your Wardrobe Will Almost Certainly Come Back in Vogue
Attending a party the other night, I looked down at what I was wearing and thought, You know you're getting older when you're wearing vintage Chanel and you're the original owner. I remembered buying this ridiculously expensive outfit 12 years ago...
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The Future Is Now
The inventor tinkering in a garage and coming up with a better mousetrap is a cherished American image. These days, that tinkering is likely to take place at a sophisticated computer or high-powered microscope. But no matter how they do their work,...
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The Healing Power of Energy: Drawing from Eastern and Western Therapies, a Leading Physician Explores the Role of Energy Medicine in Achieving and Maintaining Health
I walk past the patient with the mechanical heart to visit his roommate, on whom I performed open-heart surgery earlier in the week. I am surprised to see a woman slowly waving her hands over the victim's chest. Wearing a purple turban on her head...
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The Pulse of America
The Saturday Evening Post has undergone several transformations in its long history, dating back to Benjamin Franklin who promoted the Pennsylvania Gazette as "The Universal Instructor in all Arts and Sciences." When the name changed to The Saturday...
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The Unforgettable Natalie Cole: Twenty-Five Years Ago She Overcame a Drug Addiction That Put Her Career on Hold and Her Life in Jeopardy. Now She's Back on Top, Relying on Her Faith as She Battles New Threats to Her Health
In her book, Angel on my Shoulder, Natalie Cole tells the story of her parents move to a posh, all-white suburb of Los Angeles in 1947. Residents promptly informed Nat King Cole that home ownership was restricted to whites who celebrated Christmas....
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The Whole-Grain Promise: Scientists Are Unlocking the Secrets of What May Be the World's Most Healthful Grain
For years nutritional scientists talked up dietary fiber as the key to better health, and now they are onto something even bigger and better. Whole grains, with their heart disease-fighting properties and the combined synergistic health effects of...
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Understanding Cholesterol: In an Excerpt from His Latest Book, Dr. Dean Ornish Examines the Surprising Relationship between "Good" and "Bad" Cholesterol
There are a lot of misconceptions about HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol and LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. Most people, including many physicians, believe that HDL is "good" cholesterol, and the higher it is, the better. LDL...
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What Men Need to Know: A New Campaign Addresses Often-Overlooked Issues Affecting Men with Diabetes
Dealing with the day-to-day aspects of diabetes--blood glucose, nutrition, and lifestyle management--is a formidable challenge for all people with the disease. However, American men living with diabetes also grapple with unique physical, emotional,...
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