Current Psychiatry

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 8, August

A Psychiatric Approach to Vasovagal Syncope
Vasovagal syncope--also called neuro-cardiogenic syncope--is a brief loss of consciousness caused by a sudden drop in heart rate and blood pressure usually diagnosed and treated by a cardiologist. Psychiatrists rarely are consulted in such cases, but...
Do Stimulants for ADHD Increase the Risk of Substance Use Disorders? for Some Patients, Stimulants Might Protect against Future SUDs
Does prescribing stimulants to patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increase their risk of future substance abuse? Because ADHD is a common pediatric condition with symptoms that often persist into adulthood, and stimulants...
Focus on Change
Dr. Nasrallah's editorial ("A skeptical view of 'progress' in psychiatry," From the Editor, CURRENT PSYCHIATRY, June 2011, p. 18-19) is intriguing because it summarized concerns I have seen frequently expressed in publications catering to psychiatrists....
Managed Care Woes
Regarding Dr. Nasrallah's insightful editorial ("A skeptical view of 'progress' in psychiatry," From the Editor, Current Psychiatry, June 2011, p. 18-19): Since the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Employment Retirement Income Security Act, has enabled...
Managing Boundaries When Your Patients Are Your Neighbors
Psychiatrists--especially residents--often prefer to reside close to the hospitals in which they train and work. Training programs in urban settings may offer their residents housing either attached to the hospital or immediately adjacent to it. ...
Pharmacologic Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder: Evidence Suggests Symptom-Targeted Pharmacotherapy Can Be Beneficial
As psychiatry's Understanding of borderline personality disorder (BPD) grows, the literature clearly describes the seriousness of BPD, as well as these patients' high utilization of treatment. Pharmacotherapy for BPD remains controversial The most...
Strategies to Help Patients Break the Chains of Tobacco Addiction: Evidence-Based Treatments Can Help Patients Quit despite Psychiatric Illness
You are treating Mr. P, age 34, for schizoaffective disorder. He smokes 1 pack of cigarettes per day and has smoked for approximately 17 years. He has tried to stop but never has been able to quit for more than a few weeks. He reveals whenever he tries...
The Most Powerful Placebo Is Not a Pill
The placebo effect--when a patient's symptoms improve with an inert pill--is widely recognized in medicine. Placebo has an especially important role in psychiatry, especially given the fact that a substantial proportion of patients with mood, anxiety,...
Unexpected Improvement: For 30 Years, Ms. U, Age 53, Has Experienced Treatment-Resistant Schizohrenia. after She Is Treated for a Neurologic Disorder, Her Psychotic Symptoms Improve Markedly. What Could Be the Cause?
CASE Relapsing psychosis Ms. U, age 53, was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia at age 21 and has a continuous pattern of frequent relapses and inpatient admissions. She has received therapeutic doses of trifluoperazine, sertindole, haloperidol,...